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Korina or mahogany, which sounds the best to you?

#1 User is offline   six strings 

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 09:17 PM

For those of you who have played both. Which sounds the best to your ears?
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#2 User is offline   Blaster 

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 09:17 AM

Don't know if one is better than the other, but they do sound different to me.
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#3 User is offline   Sabredog 

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Posted 11 March 2018 - 11:30 PM

View Postsix strings, on 30 December 2007 - 09:17 PM, said:

For those of you who have played both. Which sounds the best to your ears?


I played them in a guitar Center, I could not tell the difference since it was two different styles of guitar, but it is just slightly higher grade of mahogany, necks and fret boards and pickups, make more difference.
I do think the difference would show up as you got to know the guitar.
Google is your friend Gibson talks about it:

http://www.gibson.co...reatguitar.aspx

The mere mention of Korina wood in the same breath with a guitar makes many guitarists and collectors drool. It is, after all, the wood used to build some of the most legendary Gibsons of all time—the original Flying V and the Explorer. Guitar builders, however, usually have a totally different reaction; Korina tends to make them reach for the nearest bottle of aspirin in order to ward off the headaches working with it causes.<br style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(22, 22, 22); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 13px;"><br style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(22, 22, 22); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 13px;">Considered by most experts to be a “super mahogany” or “mahogany deluxe,” Korina wood bears a strong resemblance to mahogany in both tone and grain characteristics. Those same experts also agree that Korina has a sweeter midrange, with enhanced responsiveness, which would seemingly make it more desirable as a guitar-making wood. So why isn’t Korina—more commonly known as Limba—used more extensively to make guitars?
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#4 User is offline   ChristopherJ 

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 11:23 AM

In a truly blinded test, you could not tell the difference.
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#5 User is offline   charlie brown 

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 12:36 PM

Neither one, for at least 30 years, after they dry out, properly, and gain some real resonance! [biggrin]


CB
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#6 User is offline   merciful-evans 

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 01:00 PM

I cant tell any difference.
I sometimes think; therefore I am intermittent
*
my band BLOWN OUT
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#7 User is online   Rabs 

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 05:00 PM

Its not the species but the individual piece of wood that counts the most.. And what sort of range the pickups pick the vibrations up. And the style of the guitar... and the sort of bridge it has... etc etc

Korina is known as a super mahogany, so with a lot of the warmth but a harder bright snap to it.. But that's a very generalised rule and is why every guitar is a bit different.
"Im the one thats going to have to die when its time for me to die. So let me live my life, the way I WANT TOO" Jimi Hendrix
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#8 User is offline   newlespauler 

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 01:49 PM

I think Korina - or Limba - is less readily available because it is less extensively employed by industries other than guitar manifacturing. I am not so sure that boutique guitar builders would have trouble with finding and working on Korina, but possibly, it is just not a good choice for a big industry for the reason mentioned. Hence it could well be the better wood and we may be missing out because we play guitars from big brands. Me just thinking loud here.
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#9 User is offline   SocProf 

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 10:26 PM

Korina (white and black limba) is an option on many Kiesel guitars, but always costs more than mahogany.
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