Gibson Brands Forums: How to get the right guitar sound on Logic Pro - Gibson Brands Forums

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

How to get the right guitar sound on Logic Pro I need to record my electric guitar on a track and I don't know ho

#1 User is offline   Kyler Patrick 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 180
  • Joined: 01-January 12
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 19 June 2014 - 10:26 PM

So I've got Logic Pro, but I've spent all of my time on it recording acoustic covers by miking my guitar. I want to be able to get a nice, clear tone out of my electric guitar, choose all the effects I want, and be able to run it into my computer. The only problem, I don't know where to start. What kind of interface should I get? Can I connect my effects pedal through the interface and onto the computer? Should I mic the amp rather than purchasing an interface? I have tons of questions like these because I don't know the first thing about recording with electric instruments. Please, any advice would be extremely helpful!

Thanks! [biggrin]
0

#2 User is offline   L5Larry 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 5010
  • Joined: 17-January 08
  • LocationSt. Louis, Missouri

Posted 20 June 2014 - 07:47 AM

View PostKyler Patrick, on 19 June 2014 - 10:26 PM, said:

Should I mic the amp.....


Let me preface this response by saying most of my recording studio experience (both sides of the glass) has been in "analog" studios, so I have no idea how to get your signal into digital recording equipment, but.... here's how electric guitar sounds are generally captured in professional recording studios.

Going direct into the "board", or recorder, is usually avoided as it produces a very sterile, unnatural, and unfamiliar sound. This is even more true when running through pedals and processors. What is generally the objective is to capture YOUR sound as you are familiar and satisfied with it as you hear it from your amp. Isn't this the reason you spent all that money on your guitar equipment... to get THE sound. This is usually what you are trying to capture on tape (OK, I know it's not tape anymore).

All that said, set up your normal guitar rig, and stick a dynamic mic in front of the amp (an inexpensive Shure SM-57 has been the industry standard amp mic for 40+ years). Once you dial in the sound you want, all you have to do is get it into the recorder. You will need some sort of converter to change the analog mic signal to digital. Whether this is an outboard piece of gear, or an internal circuit or program, depends on the recording setup.

Now all that's left to do is play your *** off and hope the recorder captures and recreate the sound as you hear it live (or in your head).
0

#3 User is offline   Kyler Patrick 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 180
  • Joined: 01-January 12
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 21 June 2014 - 12:12 PM

View PostL5Larry, on 20 June 2014 - 07:47 AM, said:

an inexpensive Shure SM-57 has been the industry standard amp mic for 40+ years


I was checking out the SM-57 on Musicians Friend and like what I see so far. What interface, converter or setup would I need to connect that mic to my MacBook Air with Logic Pro?
0

#4 User is offline   nick_s 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 552
  • Joined: 24-September 13
  • LocationStaffordshire, England

Posted 21 June 2014 - 12:58 PM

View PostKyler Patrick, on 21 June 2014 - 12:12 PM, said:

I was checking out the SM-57 on Musicians Friend and like what I see so far. What interface, converter or setup would I need to connect that mic to my MacBook Air with Logic Pro?


I've been eyeballing some interfaces, and one that comes up at very affordable prices is either the Alesis Core series or the Lexicon Alpha/Beta series. The Lexicon doesn't do phantom power though, not sure about the Alesis.
Current toys
2013 Gibson Les Paul Studio in Alpine White |1994 Stratocaster - Richie Sambora Signature in CAR | 2014 60th Anniversary Classic Player Stratocaster | Vox AD30VT | Blackstar Series One 45

Gone but not forgotten
2004 Gibson Les Paul Standard (50's neck, Heritage Cherry) | 1994 Fender Stratocaster - Richie Sambora Signature in LPB | 2003 Fender Stratocaster USA Deluxe (black, maple board)
2002 Yamaha RGX121 in Purple |
1994 Jackson JDR-94 - Black | 2003 Taylor 810ce | Marshall TSL100H and 1960A | Engl Thunder 50 & 2x12 Cabinet
Effects
Jim Dunlop Crybaby | TC Electronics Hall of Fame
0

#5 User is offline   Kyler Patrick 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 180
  • Joined: 01-January 12
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 21 June 2014 - 08:34 PM

View Postnick_s, on 21 June 2014 - 12:58 PM, said:

I've been eyeballing some interfaces, and one that comes up at very affordable prices is either the Alesis Core series or the Lexicon Alpha/Beta series. The Lexicon doesn't do phantom power though, not sure about the Alesis.


I'll check 'em both out! I am still 17 and a major rookie at this soooo..What is phantom power? Sorry for all the questions, I just want the first electric recording session to go as smoothly as possible.
0

#6 User is offline   nick_s 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 552
  • Joined: 24-September 13
  • LocationStaffordshire, England

Posted 22 June 2014 - 12:50 PM

View PostKyler Patrick, on 21 June 2014 - 08:34 PM, said:

I'll check 'em both out! I am still 17 and a major rookie at this soooo..What is phantom power? Sorry for all the questions, I just want the first electric recording session to go as smoothly as possible.


Same to be honest. That said, phantom power is for the microphones, trying to find out if the Alesis has it as it's something I'm looking for myself [thumbup]
Current toys
2013 Gibson Les Paul Studio in Alpine White |1994 Stratocaster - Richie Sambora Signature in CAR | 2014 60th Anniversary Classic Player Stratocaster | Vox AD30VT | Blackstar Series One 45

Gone but not forgotten
2004 Gibson Les Paul Standard (50's neck, Heritage Cherry) | 1994 Fender Stratocaster - Richie Sambora Signature in LPB | 2003 Fender Stratocaster USA Deluxe (black, maple board)
2002 Yamaha RGX121 in Purple |
1994 Jackson JDR-94 - Black | 2003 Taylor 810ce | Marshall TSL100H and 1960A | Engl Thunder 50 & 2x12 Cabinet
Effects
Jim Dunlop Crybaby | TC Electronics Hall of Fame
0

#7 User is offline   jonnyg 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 862
  • Joined: 23-March 08
  • LocationSE England

Posted 01 July 2014 - 01:51 AM

First up, I don't use Logic or a Mac so I can't help with any specific questions about that. Logic is a DAW and it's not so very different from any other DAW. Some people like Logic, some like Protools and others like other DAWs, it's as simple as that. The only DAW I've used which is markedly different from the rest is Ableton Live. That's mainly aimed at dance music production.

If by Alesis Core you're talking about the Core 2 or 8, they have phantom power. The Core 1 doesn't seem to, but a single input interface is really not worth the bother.
What is phantom power? It's a fancy name for a power supply. Condenser mics need a power supply of (generally) 48v, and phantom power supplies that. If you don't have a condenser mic, you don't need phantom power. Shure SM57's and 58's are dynamic mics and don't need phantom power. If you plan on getting a condenser mic in the future (and if you think you'll really get into recording you most probably will), buy an interface with phantom power. The difference in cost is marginal. Unless your computer has XLR connectors (unlikely), you really should consider an interface. An interface will not only give you the right balanced connectors it will give you proper drivers which will reduce latency.

While I'll agree with L5 Larry that sticking a dynamic mic in front of the amp is standard industry practice, I don't find it gives anything like the best results. Question. When you sit in your room and play your guitar, do you sit with your ear jammed up against the speaker cabinet? That's the effect you'll get with an SM57 in front of the speaker. An alternate way is to use two mics. The SM57 against the speaker and a condenser mic further back. If you have your amp on the floor, prop a thick book under the front so that the amp is angled slightly upwards. Now play your guitar with the settings/FX you like and walk around until you hit the sweet spot where you hear the tone you were looking for. Put a condenser mic right there where your ear is. Record both mics and then adjust the balance to taste at mixdown. That was a tip/trick I learned from reading a Dave Gilmour article years ago and I've used it ever since when there's no option of using a plugin ampsim (see next)

An alternative way of recording guitar is to use virtual amp VSTs/AU. The best, or most commonly thought best, are Amplitube from IK Multimedia and Guitar Rig from Native instruments (free cutdown versions are available from both companies). There are also many free virtual amps, but the majority are VST for PC. With these you can either play your guitar straight through them (having dialled in the tone you want) and record the output into your DAW or you can record your guitar straight in dry and then use an amp sim to re-amp it. Reamping is simply a way of keeping your options open. Either way eliminates the need for a physical amp/cab/FX and microphones.

YouTube is a great place to learn about recording. I'd also recommend that you have a look at 'The Recording Revolution' site. Graham gives tons of practical, free advice, and videos, which is useful whether you're an absolute beginner or someone who thought he knew it all. It's free, so you've nothing to lose.
http://therecordingrevolution.com/

Hope all or some of that helps.

Oh, and if you think any of this is tricky, wait until you get interested in virtual drums and MIDI.
0

#8 User is offline   Rookie 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 20
  • Joined: 13-July 14

Posted 22 July 2014 - 12:30 PM

View Postnick_s, on 21 June 2014 - 12:58 PM, said:

I've been eyeballing some interfaces.. The Lexicon doesn't do phantom power though, not sure about the Alesis.

You won't need phantom power unless you're using a condenser mic.. The SM-57 is not a condenser mic.
But, before you get too far into interfaces, think about the future.
The interface will just get you from a microphone to a USB connector where your computer will see it as data and take over.
I bought an inexpensive M-Audio, M box. Yes, it worked, but, the mic preamp didn't have enough gain to get a decent level.
The interface is powered by the USB and there's just not enough juice there. So, I added a cheap mic preamp, and got a decent level.
But, even though the interface had two inputs, I had no way to pan them. So, in the software, I could lay one down as left. and repeat it on right, but it doesn't make stereo,
It makes two monos. If that's good enough, you're home free. (or you can lay down one mono to both tracks, and it's still mono)
But I wanted to get to the next level, stereo, so I decided that what I wish I'd have bought first is a mixer with pan pots and a USB output.
Then, I could use a stereo source and have real stereo. (I was playing with a stereo chorus pedal)
Let's say you have a drum kit, you'd like to be able to widen the sound of the drums.

Your first step is to think ahead and see how far you want to go. Buy once.
If a simple recording is enough, any decent interface will do the job. I found doing it the cheap and easy way led to many traps, always requiring more gear.
EBay is my friend. I should have bought a USB mixer first. You don't need a lot of faders, but you should have gain pots and pan pots.
0

#9 User is offline   LPS1976 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1040
  • Joined: 17-July 14
  • LocationNashville

Posted 06 August 2014 - 02:46 PM

if you're using a Mac, I'd go with an Apogee interface. they make everything from a single guitar interface to multiple input for multi tracking. honestly, the sound quality kills! a good place to call would be Sweetwater. they can walk you through what they have based on your needs and budget and hook you up.
0

#10 User is offline   AB53 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 14-August 14

Posted 20 August 2014 - 02:44 PM

I like to mic the amp and go direct. Then I have two channels to work with. Also, if you have a relatively clean channel, you can add effects later.
0

#11 User is offline   Lwebbetm 

  • Newbie
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 05-March 16

Posted 07 March 2016 - 12:31 PM

I don't have solar panels on my roof, but do have steel up there. That sound sends our dog off the deep end every time.
Охрипший солист Большого верещал заикаясь независимо от кого-либо.
cms сайта
0

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users