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Derelict Gibson LG-12

#21 User is offline   Damocles 

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 11:41 AM

There are two dowels; one beneath the bridge and one beneath the damage to the soundboard. I need to find a small mirror to get a better look at the inside to see what's going on. I didn't even notice them until I put the strings on.

The neck is good. The most comfortable 12 string I've played. Decent amount of fret wire left; a little dressing and polishing wouldn't hurt. Fret board is worn but I've seen a lot worse (including my old Epiphone 6830E). It tunes up and stays in tune and has a nice, bright parlor guitar kinda tone with not a lot of bottom (although, I suppose heavier strings at the bottom would help). Other than the tuners and the soundboard damage it appears solid. And old... And I like that refinishing idea. But the real question at this stage is...where to begin?

BTW, Jinder, an old mate from uni plays the occasional gig with his band down your Dorset way...Flashmob?
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#22 User is offline   Jinder 

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 02:45 PM

I've heard of Flashmob! I've not seen them play but the name is definitely familiar, I'll keep an eye out.

The dowels are interesting, do they look stock or like something that's been added at a later date?

I'd say the first step with the refinish is to have a word with a few luthiers who are local to you and figure out who has the expertise to give it a top notch nitro refinish with a proper burst, I know in the Reso world there are specialists who can do authentic replatings and refinishes with period correct Duco crystal paint etc...on the non-Reso side, Dave King and Celine Camerlynck in London have done some spectacular restoration work I've seen, and I know Graham Parker does very good refinishes too, although his are more satin finish/hand rubbed which wouldn't be my first choice (personal taste of course, he is brilliant at what he does).

As it has a few repairs and isn't a particularly rare instrument there is nothing to lose by having it refinished, and I think it would turn out to be an absolutely beautiful looking little guitar and a one of a kind instrument with the work done right...plus it would be all tidied up and ready to go for another fortysomething years.

I find this sort of thing massively exciting...I apologise for rambling excitedly about it!
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2015 SJ200 Standard
2011 Dove
1967 J45
2014 SJ100 1941 Reissue
2014 Epiphone IB '64 Texan
2001 Epiphone EL-00 (early L1 shape model)
2003 Takamine EAN20C
1978 Hohner Leyanda 12 String
2002 Perez 601 Classical
1998 Fender Classic Series '60s RI Telecaster
2016 Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster

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#23 User is offline   Damocles 

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 05:47 PM

The doweling doesn't look professional enough to be stock. Definitely playing a part with that soundboard damage as support or something... The bridge has that "halo" around it as if it was reglued, as well.

Thanks for the suggestions but I'm not in the UK right now and, besides, anything that much fun I'd rather do it myself. I've refinished solid body electrics but never an acoustic. Wondering whether sanding the soundboard, to start, or scrub it with some steel wool and solvent to get it even...?

Yes, it is easy to get excited by something so challenging and so much fun, isn't it?
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#24 User is offline   j45nick 

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 06:13 PM

View PostDamocles, on 21 May 2017 - 05:47 PM, said:

The doweling doesn't look professional enough to be stock. Definitely playing a part with that soundboard damage as support or something... The bridge has that "halo" around it as if it was reglued, as well.

Thanks for the suggestions but I'm not in the UK right now and, besides, anything that much fun I'd rather do it myself. I've refinished solid body electrics but never an acoustic. Wondering whether sanding the soundboard, to start, or scrub it with some steel wool and solvent to get it even...?

Yes, it is easy to get excited by something so challenging and so much fun, isn't it?



I have stripped and sanded soundboards down and refinished them before. It just requires careful masking and careful scraping and sanding, using sanding blocks to level the soundboard. Before doing this, you need to carefully inspect the inside of the guitar for loose braces, as the dowel may have been inserted to counteract a sinking soundboard.

If you use a chemical stripper, keep it off the binding. It will dissolve it. This is from first-hand experience.

When I first did this type of job almost 50 years ago, I refinished with Deft, which was a brushable or sprayable nitrocellulose lacquer. These days, I would use the spray cans of nitro lacquer available from Stewmac.

Your chances of doing an acceptable sunburst refinish as a first-time effort are close to nil. You may want to simply do a clear finish similar to what you have now. Gibson has used a clear finish as an option on most models over the years, so there is nothing non-authentic about this.

You can buy the lacquer from Stewmac pre-tinted with an aging toner. If you just use un-toned clear lacquer, the wood is likely to look like new wood, rather than a 40+ year old finish.

But it's your guitar, so it's your choice.
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