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Classic 2017 advice

#21 User is offline   jmg257 

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 10:06 AM

If its not for you, then no foul in getting something you like!
Life's too short to settle...
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#22 User is offline   hi13ts 

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 12:17 AM

Andy, I have to say, I played a 2017 Classic earlier in the year and was actually surprised at how "un-Les Paul" it sounded to me. It was very non-resonant and bright. I played two models, the green one and the goldtop. They seemed to play well, but I was just very surprised at my experience with it. However, I own a 2016 Traditional which is essentially the same model barring the different finishes, tuners, and uncovered pickups and it is exactly what I think of when I think of a Les Paul. My experience with the new 2017s are that way as well. This is just a theory, but I know the Traditionals were getting "ultra-low density" mahogany bodies, while the Classics were just "low density". I don't know if this really makes the difference but there was a night and day between the Classics and the Traditionals for me. So I recommend you playing a few more models, especially the Traditionals. I think you'll find that Gibson vibe you're looking for.
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#23 User is offline   Andynikken 

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 07:46 AM

View PostMatty1976, on 22 September 2017 - 08:52 AM, said:

I definitely have to dial in my tone for whatever guitar I am playing. If I plug any of my Les Pauls in after my Strat it's going to sound awful. Those Epi pickups are definitely not 57 Classics, or EMGs or Dimarzio, etc. Every guitar I have sounds different, plays different, and definitely takes adjustment when going from one to the other.

Hi i looked up my epi pickups on my guitar, here is the description.

Hearing is Believing: Capturing everything these tone woods and premium construction have to give are a pair of Gibson U.S.A. BurstBucker™ pickups. BurstBucker™ pickups replicate the sound of Gibson's original "Patent Applied For" pickups - the pickups that gave the '59 and '60 Les Paul Standards their legendary sound. Like the originals, with unpolished magnets and non-potted coils, variations in pickup output and tone also came from inconsistencies in winding the bobbins, a result of the lack of automatic shutoffs on Gibson's winding machines in the late 1950s. Seth Lover, who invented the humbucker, always said they wound the bobbins "until they were full." When two coils in a pickup have a different number of turns, that variation puts a little "edge" or "bite" on the classic humbucker sound. That's the sound BurstBuckers replicate. The neck pickup is a Burstbucker-1 and is slightly under-wound for a "medium" vintage output. The bridge pickup is a Burstbucker-2 that is wound in the range of a '57 Classic pickup with slightly hotter vintage output that works well in combination with the BB-1 in the neck. One listen and you'll think you have a 50-year old guitar in your hands!
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#24 User is offline   Megafrog 

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 06:10 PM

View PostAndynikken, on 01 October 2017 - 07:46 AM, said:

Hi i looked up my epi pickups on my guitar, here is the description.

Hearing is Believing: Capturing everything these tone woods and premium construction have to give are a pair of Gibson U.S.A. BurstBucker™ pickups. BurstBucker™ pickups replicate the sound of Gibson's original "Patent Applied For" pickups - the pickups that gave the '59 and '60 Les Paul Standards their legendary sound. Like the originals, with unpolished magnets and non-potted coils, variations in pickup output and tone also came from inconsistencies in winding the bobbins, a result of the lack of automatic shutoffs on Gibson's winding machines in the late 1950s. Seth Lover, who invented the humbucker, always said they wound the bobbins "until they were full." When two coils in a pickup have a different number of turns, that variation puts a little "edge" or "bite" on the classic humbucker sound. That's the sound BurstBuckers replicate. The neck pickup is a Burstbucker-1 and is slightly under-wound for a "medium" vintage output. The bridge pickup is a Burstbucker-2 that is wound in the range of a '57 Classic pickup with slightly hotter vintage output that works well in combination with the BB-1 in the neck. One listen and you'll think you have a 50-year old guitar in your hands!



So your Epi has Gibson pickups? I like the BB1 and 2 combo, they do sound good in a LP.
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#25 User is offline   1all's Pub 

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 08:03 AM

Gibson and Fender have COMPLETELY different approaches to building guitars. If you are familiar with, and like, the Fender approach, Gibson's approach may not ever be satisfiying to you (I am the other way around, Fenders feel cold and impersonal and cookie-cutter to me... I love how each Gibson has its own unique vibe, but I digress).

My best advice, return it, take the hit (both in monetary and marital terms ;)) and buy something other than a Gibson. Their construction methods harken back to a time when things were much more hands-on and the results much more variable as a result. Something that Leo Fender specifically set out to do differently when he started building his guitars. LP bodies and necks are CNC'd nowadays, but after that almost everything (aside from the new PLEK'ing) is done by hand. The neck is set by hand, the fretboard is glued to the neck by hand, the frets are initially installed by hand, the binding is applied by hand, the guitar is individually painted by hand, the binding is scraped by hand, the body is buffed by hand, the elecronics are installed by hand, etc. It's just not really a cookie-cutter process at all. Was never intended to be. Mass produced (as in assembly line), yes... cookie-cutter, no.

We, as modern consumers, are much more used to things that are built with modern build techniques AND modern build philosophies. Gibsons are just not that way. It may well be that no Gibson really ever will feel "right" to you because you're used to modern manufacturing. Epi LPs look like their Gibson counterparts at first glance, but upon closer inspection the two are miles apart in look and feel. As they should be, their manufacturing approaches are very different. Honestly, the best advice to give you might be, that you're just not a Gibson guy... don't force it.
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#26 User is offline   rct 

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 08:18 AM

View Post1all, on 10 October 2017 - 08:03 AM, said:

Their construction methods harken back to a time when things were much more hands-on and the results much more variable as a result. Something that Leo Fender specifically set out to do differently when he started building his guitars.


He wanted guitar players to be able to replace the neck if it broke, and just replace it if it needed a refret.

View Post1all, on 10 October 2017 - 08:03 AM, said:

LP bodies and necks are CNC'd nowadays,


Yes, if by "nowadays" you mean since the mid 70's.

View Post1all, on 10 October 2017 - 08:03 AM, said:

but after that almost everything (aside from the new PLEK'ing) is done by hand. The neck is set by hand,


Yes, and over at Fender, they screw the neck on by hand.

View Post1all, on 10 October 2017 - 08:03 AM, said:

the fretboard is glued to the neck by hand, the frets are initially installed by hand, the binding is applied by hand, the guitar is individually painted by hand, the binding is scraped by hand, the body is buffed by hand, the elecronics are installed by hand, etc.


Yes, and over at Fender, rosewood boards are glued on by hand, the frets are all set by hand, at Fender, not many guitars are bound, but the ones that are are bound by hand, guitars are painted by hand individually, the binding is scraped by hand, the painted body is buffed by hand, and a nice group of young ladies was hand assembling and soldering electronics, they talked to me a long time.

View Post1all, on 10 October 2017 - 08:03 AM, said:

It's just not really a cookie-cutter process at all. Was never intended to be. Mass produced (as in assembly line), yes... cookie-cutter, no.


The differences are amazing!

rct
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#27 User is offline   Andynikken 

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 10:45 AM

Thank you all for your advice guys, Iím happy to say I have got shut and purchased a PRS , it is fantastic, but I still would like a Gibson so I may try the studio out , but rest assured I will test it first.
Thank you all again
Andy
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#28 User is offline   jdgm 

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 12:41 PM

View PostAndynikken, on 10 October 2017 - 10:45 AM, said:

Thank you all for your advice guys, I’m happy to say I have got shut and purchased a PRS.......


[laugh] [laugh] Oh well....you may enjoy reading this then....

http://forum.gibson....ou-away-gibson/
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#29 User is offline   Andynikken 

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 04:22 PM

 jdgm, on 10 October 2017 - 12:41 PM, said:

[laugh] [laugh] Oh well....you may enjoy reading this then....

http://forum.gibson....ou-away-gibson/

Canít read all of it but it seems to me his Gibson was not actually faulty where as mine looked like a Chinese copy, the PRS is fantastic though, it stays in tune and feels superb, but I still want a Gibson but not a Classic
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#30 User is offline   Megafrog 

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 08:13 PM

What PRS model did you get?
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#31 User is offline   Andynikken 

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 11:53 PM

SE custom which has left me a fair bit towards a Gibson from my original spend on the classic, hence the possible Studio or SG purchase
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#32 User is offline   Megafrog 

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 07:30 PM

SE Customs do have a lot of bang for the buck. Enjoy your PRS SE!
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#33 User is offline   FZ Fan 

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:46 PM

View PostAndynikken, on 22 September 2017 - 09:58 AM, said:

Thank you for that, I have tried and tried but I am disliking it more and more,
I think my problem is I just don't like it and it's a tricky one as my wife bought it for me, there is nothing about this guitar I like, I love my American Strat and the epi was just a back up for heavier songs which is fine, but if I compare the Strat build against the Gibson build hands down the strat is better to my eyes and ears so I just need to figure out how to get it changed.
I just expected more from Gibson in the quality of the build but as you say it's hand built, more than that I do not like the zebra pickups, maybe if she got me a standard I may have kept on and played it.
Thanks for you honest opinion


Just buy about 10 more guitars sell the LP and she will never know.
1995 - Fender American Standard Jazz Bass with Rio Grande Pickups and a Warmoth J Bass Neck
1997 - Fender American Standard Tele with Rio Grande Pickups
2000 - Gibson SG Special
2003 - Fender American Deluxe HSS Strat with Rio Grande Pickups and a Warmoth Strat Neck
2009 - Gibson BB King "Lucille" Signature Model
2009 - Kala KA-T Tenor Ukulele
2011 - Martin D-28

2014 - Gibson Les Paul Traditional Pro II with Lindy Fralin Pure PAF's
20?? - Martin D-18 (On Layaway)

Fender Deville 60 Watt Combo Guitar Amp

Fender Blues Jr. 15 Watt Como Guitar Amp with a Weber Speaker
Mesa Transatlantc TA-15 Head 5W/15W/25W Switchable
Egnater Tweaker 40 Watt Combo Guitar Amp (On Loan To My Son)

Fender Hot Rod Deluxe Extension Cab with a Weber Speaker
Acoustic B100 Amp 100 Watt Bass Combo Amp
Orange CrushPiX CRL20 20 Watt Guitar Amp
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