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IS because is a cheap guita or is because the wood?

#1 User is offline   sebastian76 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 01:20 PM

Hi there,
Have a look to the picture, i wonder , that "white" dots on th fretboard wood, is because the wood is like that or because as every guitar made in china is a cheap thing?
I saw this thing on at least three casinos...


thanks a lot in advance folks!

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This post has been edited by sebastian76: 25 January 2018 - 01:22 PM

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#2 User is offline   mihcmac 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 01:37 PM

Rosewood fingerboards normally have a very grainy texture and can get stuff stuck in the groves like wax, you could try working a wood oil into the groves to darken it. I use tung oil or linseed oil the fingerboard, it needs care too just like the rest of the guitar but not wax it will turn white in the cracks

But if you want smooth you need a maple fingerboard or even try teac.


This post has been edited by mihcmac: 25 January 2018 - 02:16 PM

P-90's Rule.... Posted Image Posted Image
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#3 User is offline   Lord Summerisle 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 01:42 PM

double-post deleted

This post has been edited by Lord Summerisle: 25 January 2018 - 01:43 PM

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#4 User is offline   Lord Summerisle 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 01:43 PM

Everything is made to a price point: the point at which the manufacturer, possibly a distributor, the shipper, and finally the retailer can make a decent profit. A standard Epiphone Casino goes for what, $650? How much can the build price per unit realistically be?

This is not meant to criticize the guitar. It's just a comment that one has to be realistic. It's a production line guitar from Epiphone with a retail price of $650, not a custom build from a boutique luthier like Crimson. I'm not sure that margins change much, just prices - in order to meet margins.

The white/yellow stuff looks like grain filler. Properly cured and finished, it's not going anywhere, and ought not negatively affect the playability. It is what it is.

This post has been edited by Lord Summerisle: 25 January 2018 - 01:45 PM

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#5 User is offline   jdgm 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 02:11 PM

Nothing to worry about at all, very common on rosewood boards whatever the cost of the guitar.
As noted, either traces of filler or perhaps polishing compound. Should disappear over time.
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#6 User is offline   sebastian76 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 02:46 PM

View PostLord Summerisle, on 25 January 2018 - 01:43 PM, said:

Everything is made to a price point: the point at which the manufacturer, possibly a distributor, the shipper, and finally the retailer can make a decent profit. A standard Epiphone Casino goes for what, $650? How much can the build price per unit realistically be?

This is not meant to criticize the guitar. It's just a comment that one has to be realistic. It's a production line guitar from Epiphone with a retail price of $650, not a custom build from a boutique luthier like Crimson. I'm not sure that margins change much, just prices - in order to meet margins.

The white/yellow stuff looks like grain filler. Properly cured and finished, it's not going anywhere, and ought not negatively affect the playability. It is what it is.

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#7 User is offline   sebastian76 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 02:49 PM

okay,nice but, is a cheap guitar isn't it? I did not say a false affirmation...(but still remember how good were korean casinos .... only looking at their F you can see a difference )
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#8 User is offline   sebastian76 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 02:53 PM

BTW, thanks to everybody for these replies and thank you all for the time you have spent writing them.
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#9 User is offline   vomer 

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 07:39 PM

What they said, and you may be able to clean this stuff out. Try an old toothbrush. I always try a soft one first, it helps that I have a kid so we have soft brushes around. But a firm plastic bristle one won't hurt the finish either.
Paul.


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#10 User is offline   Pinch 

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 04:08 AM

Gorgomyte every other year or so. Great stuff.
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#11 User is offline   kidblast 

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 06:34 AM

I'd hydrate the fret board with a good conditioner, (Guitar Honey or the like) the wood looks a tad dry.


btw.. I'd rather consider a guitar "inexpensive" verses cheap :) you can get a whole lot of guitar for not a whole lot of money these days.

nothing like when I was starting out in the late 60s. "inexpensive" guitars were typically an absolute nightmare to try and learn on.
/Ray
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#12 User is offline   sebastian76 

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 09:40 AM

does it look dry? maybe is the pic as the guitar is new! -1 week- (well maybe it has been stored for months in the warehouse)

cheers
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#13 User is offline   kidblast 

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 09:58 AM

View Postsebastian76, on 26 January 2018 - 09:40 AM, said:

does it look dry? maybe is the pic as the guitar is new! -1 week- (well maybe it has been stored for months in the warehouse)

cheers


The first thing I usually do with a new guitar is replace the strings, hydrate the fret-board, and polish the frets.. your mileage may vary..
/Ray
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#14 User is offline   Parabar 

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 01:37 PM

Not every Chinese guitar is a cheapo. Eastman guitars are made in China, and they are extremely high-quality. I've seen plenty of Chinese Epiphones that were quality instruments as well.

And as others have pointed out, plenty of guitars --- both cheap and expensive --- can have grain filler in rosewood fingerboards that does not compromise either tone or playability.
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#15 User is offline   Pinch 

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 03:29 PM

Skin residue and/or fretboard conditioner residue. Toothbrush and Gorgomyte. You'll be fine.
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#16 User is offline   Pinch 

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 03:31 PM

Oh yeah - you'll eventually get that with all rosewood fretboards.
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#17 User is offline   Gibsy 

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 03:58 AM

That is not compound residue, but mineral trapped in wood during its develop and yes, expensive guitars donít have this minor issue cause have a better wood selection.
V
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#18 User is offline   Megafrog 

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 05:52 AM

I agree with the majority opinion of just wax et al etc and no worries. If it is too bothersome, go Townsend with the guitar and buy two to replace it.
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#19 User is offline   sebastian76 

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 11:35 AM

View PostGibsy, on 27 January 2018 - 03:58 AM, said:

That is not compound residue, but mineral trapped in wood during its develop and yes, expensive guitars donít have this minor issue cause have a better wood selection.
V

yes is what i thought ( about a better wood selection on expensive guitars). Is ,as you say,a minor issue ( toothbrush trick doesn't work, so I think is what you said, mineral trapped).
cheers
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#20 User is offline   deeman 

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Posted 28 January 2018 - 02:26 PM

View Postsebastian76, on 26 January 2018 - 09:40 AM, said:

does it look dry? maybe is the pic as the guitar is new! -1 week- (well maybe it has been stored for months in the warehouse)

cheers



Exactly, it could be in a dry or humid warehouse for a while, which is why the advice of oiling the fretboard and setting up the guitar is recommended so often. [thumbup]
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