Gibson Brands Forums: Neck vs bridge pickup on 2017 LP STD - Gibson Brands Forums

Jump to content

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Neck vs bridge pickup on 2017 LP STD

#1 User is offline   MikeCT 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 12-July 17
  • LocationConnecticut

Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:06 PM

I have the Les Paul that I am running through a Marshall DSL 5CR. I always find myself using the bridge pickup because the neck sounds muddy in comparison. A couple of nights ago I saw Kenny Chesney in Austin and both his band and Old Domion (openers) always had their LPs in the bridge pickup too. I didnít see it once in any other position.

Is that was most people do, or when do you go for both or the neck? This is my first Gibson electric and iíve only had it for a month or two. I (try to) play old school metal (maiden, Metallica, etc) and some country (Chesney, Aldean, Eric church).

Thanks!
Mike

This post has been edited by MikeCT: 17 May 2018 - 11:08 PM

2017 Gibson J-45 Standard
2017 Gibson Hummingbird Standard
2017 Gibson Les Paul Standard
0

#2 User is offline   Johnny 6 String 

  • Just one of the boys...
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 584
  • Joined: 01-September 11
  • LocationOntario, Canada

Posted 18 May 2018 - 07:27 AM

View PostMikeCT, on 17 May 2018 - 11:06 PM, said:

I have the Les Paul that I am running through a Marshall DSL 5CR. I always find myself using the bridge pickup because the neck sounds muddy in comparison. A couple of nights ago I saw Kenny Chesney in Austin and both his band and Old Domion (openers) always had their LPs in the bridge pickup too. I didnít see it once in any other position.

Is that was most people do, or when do you go for both or the neck? This is my first Gibson electric and iíve only had it for a month or two. I (try to) play old school metal (maiden, Metallica, etc) and some country (Chesney, Aldean, Eric church).

Thanks!
Mike




Hi Mike;

Try lowering your neck pick up, that should clear out some mud. I've my neck set about even with the trim ring. There is no right or wrong height, just what sounds good.

Johnny
2

#3 User is offline   paddybrown 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 14
  • Joined: 16-May 18

Posted 18 May 2018 - 09:01 AM

You can also adjust your amp settings and your guitar's volume and tone controls until you can get a sound you like from both pickups.
0

#4 User is offline   merciful-evans 

  • upstanding member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 3742
  • Joined: 28-May 15
  • LocationPortsmouth UK

Posted 18 May 2018 - 11:16 AM

I go about it the other way. I use the neck pickup on all my guitars. I seldom, if ever, touch the bridge pickup.

But unlike you I dont play heavy metal. So we are not comparing like for like.
I use minimal gain and balance EQ with a signal processor.

When Clapton used a Les Paul, he used the bridge pickup with the tone backed right off.

Its always worth experimenting with the pickup options though. Good luck.
I sometimes think; therefore I am intermittent
*
my band BLOWN OUT
1

#5 User is online   rct 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 9354
  • Joined: 31-March 11
  • LocationSouthern New Jersey

Posted 18 May 2018 - 12:03 PM

If you set your amp and pedals for the back pickup(bridge) on a Les Paul for both crunchy grindy chording and ripping a solo or three, the front pickup(neck) should be pretty good for soloing. If you want to crunch and grind or do some front pickup jazzing on a guitar like that, you will probably have to twiddle some knobs.

There is a lot of commotion above the front pickup, lots of string movement and a pickup right up close to all that string movement. Lowering the pickup will help a little, but in my experience setting the amp and pedals once for both front and back pickups on a two humbucker guitar is really hard. I would do it, and I'd live with the result, usually by picking back closer to the bridge when using the front pickup, sometimes I'd remember to push the trebs up on the amp.

Like those guys you are watching, I would not very often move off the back pickup on those guitars.

rct
1

#6 User is offline   paddybrown 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 14
  • Joined: 16-May 18

Posted 18 May 2018 - 12:04 PM

I'm not a metal player either - my band plays blues, r&b, and some late 60s/early 70s psychedelic rock - and I use a decent amount of gain, but I use the neck pickup as my main lead pickup. It works for me because my band only has one guitar and no keyboard player - just guitar, bass, drums and vocals - and when you stop playing chords to play a solo, it leaves a lot of sonic space to fill. The lovely fat clarinetty tone of the neck pickup does that nicely. Home base for rhythm is the bridge with the volume about seven, and for lead the neck with the volume about eight (yay for Gibson's independent volume controls), with some songs having other settings. But if I was playing with a second guitarist or a keyboard player who could keep the chords going while I solo, the bridge would probably be better at cutting through the mix.

This post has been edited by paddybrown: 18 May 2018 - 12:06 PM

1

#7 User is offline   Derald 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 50
  • Joined: 17-September 17

Posted 18 May 2018 - 12:16 PM

If itís a new Standard 2017 then those pickups shouldnít be muddy by design. They are normally bright pickups.
As suggested, lower the neck pickup. Mine is actually about 2mm below the pickup ring. I set it by ear and didnít worry where it was positioned. I just backed it down until it sounded right.
Look at all the classic rockers and their Les Pauls they have those pickups backed way down. That is why theyíre adjustable!
I tend to have the low E side a bit lower than the high e side on the neck and the reverse on the bridge pickups (lower e and higher E sides).
Donít be afraid to experiment with pickup heights. Thatís the first thing you should do - long before you consider new pots or caps or pickups.
Most pickups are sensitive to very small adjustments so a turn or two of the screw driver might be all you need to clean up that neck.
0

#8 User is offline   paddybrown 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 14
  • Joined: 16-May 18

Posted 18 May 2018 - 12:24 PM

View PostDerald, on 18 May 2018 - 12:16 PM, said:

Donít be afraid to experiment with pickup heights. Thatís the first thing you should do - long before you consider new pots or caps or pickups.


Absolutely! It's amazing how much difference you can make to the tone of your guitar with a few turns of a screwdriver. More people need to know this!
0

#9 User is offline   Black Dog 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 1165
  • Joined: 15-December 15

Posted 18 May 2018 - 01:48 PM

I don't know what anyone else will say about this but (and I think this is kind of what RCT said above), I set up my tone on the bridge for a good hard rock crunchy grind with the pickup volume around 7-8. Then when I use my neck pickup with the volume around 4 I can get some really nice, cleaner mellower tones. If I crank the bridge pickup to 10 it gets a bit nastier and with higher volume on the neck it gets muddy fast for the rhythm stuff, but for leads can be very nice. All of that with no pedal or amp changes.

Of course, that's me with my amp, ears and taste. But, point is you can get a lot of different tones with just your pickup pots once your amp is dialed in. Don't be afraid of turning them too low.
1

#10 User is offline   MikeCT 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 12-July 17
  • LocationConnecticut

Posted 18 May 2018 - 02:09 PM

View Postpaddybrown, on 18 May 2018 - 09:01 AM, said:

You can also adjust your amp settings and your guitar's volume and tone controls until you can get a sound you like from both pickups.


I find myself lowering the guitar volumes a decent amount to get a better sound and having to juice the gain more in the Amp. Itís just a tough comp compared to that amazing bridge pickup sound (to my ears at least).
2017 Gibson J-45 Standard
2017 Gibson Hummingbird Standard
2017 Gibson Les Paul Standard
0

#11 User is offline   MikeCT 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 12-July 17
  • LocationConnecticut

Posted 18 May 2018 - 02:11 PM

View Postrct, on 18 May 2018 - 12:03 PM, said:

If you set your amp and pedals for the back pickup(bridge) on a Les Paul for both crunchy grindy chording and ripping a solo or three, the front pickup(neck) should be pretty good for soloing. If you want to crunch and grind or do some front pickup jazzing on a guitar like that, you will probably have to twiddle some knobs.

There is a lot of commotion above the front pickup, lots of string movement and a pickup right up close to all that string movement. Lowering the pickup will help a little, but in my experience setting the amp and pedals once for both front and back pickups on a two humbucker guitar is really hard. I would do it, and I'd live with the result, usually by picking back closer to the bridge when using the front pickup, sometimes I'd remember to push the trebs up on the amp.

Like those guys you are watching, I would not very often move off the back pickup on those guitars.

rct


Really helpful - thank you!
2017 Gibson J-45 Standard
2017 Gibson Hummingbird Standard
2017 Gibson Les Paul Standard
0

#12 User is offline   MikeCT 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 12-July 17
  • LocationConnecticut

Posted 18 May 2018 - 02:18 PM

And thanks to everyone that I didnít specifically reply too. I learned a lot here. When I get home tonight step 1 is going to be to roll down the neck volume a lot more than where I have it, and if that doesnít do it step 2 will be to lower the pickup by 1-2 turns and take it from there.

I think I have been running with the volume to high based on the comments.
2017 Gibson J-45 Standard
2017 Gibson Hummingbird Standard
2017 Gibson Les Paul Standard
1

#13 User is offline   MikeCT 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 12-July 17
  • LocationConnecticut

Posted 18 May 2018 - 02:28 PM

Off topic I know but Iím so glad that I bought my two acoustic Gibsons last year because I basically too a year off from playing my Strat because I was really into the acoustics. When I got back into electric mode I just couldnít fret squat on the Strat and I hated the more curved fretboard. I was able to make a fantastic trade for this LP - these are such amazing guitars. I live everything aspect of playing it.
2017 Gibson J-45 Standard
2017 Gibson Hummingbird Standard
2017 Gibson Les Paul Standard
0

#14 User is offline   american cheez 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 1209
  • Joined: 19-April 14

Posted 18 May 2018 - 03:11 PM

$5 says the pickup is too high. most times, in my experience, this is the problem when it comes to the neck pickup.
yakuni tatanai
0

#15 User is offline   Derald 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 50
  • Joined: 17-September 17

Posted 19 May 2018 - 08:28 AM

If after lowering the neck pickup youíre still not happy, what iíve done is swap out the pots for 500k ones plus a 0.015 cap. Gibson usually supplies guitars with 300k high tolerance pots so going to 500k with a smaller cap might give your neck pickup the brightness you need.
0

#16 User is offline   Leonard McCoy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 511
  • Joined: 27-October 15

Posted 19 May 2018 - 02:02 PM

I mostly use neck for clean and bridge for dirty/distorted.
2018 Gibson J-180 (Everly)
2009 Gibson Les Paul Standard Ebony
2004 Fender 50th Anniversary American Deluxe Stratocaster
2002 Gibson "Goldtone" GA-15RV
1990 Ovation Legend L717 (A-bracing)

Finely transcribed Cat Stevens Guitar Tabs (fan project)

"Believe me when I say that some of the most amazing music in history
was made on equipment that's not as good as what you own right now."óJol Dantzig, founder of Hamer Guitars
0

#17 User is offline   MikeCT 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 71
  • Joined: 12-July 17
  • LocationConnecticut

Posted 19 May 2018 - 07:20 PM

View PostLeonard McCoy, on 19 May 2018 - 02:02 PM, said:

I mostly use neck for clean and bridge for dirty/distorted.


Oh, thatís interesting. Iím going to look into that later tonight.

Thanks!
Mike
2017 Gibson J-45 Standard
2017 Gibson Hummingbird Standard
2017 Gibson Les Paul Standard
0

#18 User is offline   kidblast 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 10523
  • Joined: 29-March 12
  • LocationCentral Mass (U.S.A.)

Posted 21 May 2018 - 04:18 AM

Def lower that neck pup.

the volume pots will work wonders.

also for the middle position, if you dial back the volume on the guitar a bit, you can get some great clarity from that setting too.
/Ray
1

#19 User is offline   Andy56 

  • Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 26
  • Joined: 17-May 18
  • LocationBuenos Aires, Argentina

Posted 22 May 2018 - 08:06 AM

I always feel in my LP or in another guitars with such configuration, more volume at the neck pickup than at the bridge one for clean tones, I solved it with my bridge pickup volume i.e.: in 8 and the neck in 5 or 6, while with an overdrive pedal connected both sounds are even or close to, this is another way to solve.
Sometimes it is a matter of where you put your hand to strung the guitar, if you strung closer to the bridge the sound is more "tight" letīs say, while playing over the neck pickup even only with the bridge one connected, gives you a more open sound.
It is something that you need to experiment.
BR
Andy
0

#20 User is offline   Wild Bill 212 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: All Access
  • Posts: 342
  • Joined: 07-June 16
  • LocationN E USA/S E ASIA

Posted 28 May 2018 - 05:28 AM

View PostMikeCT, on 17 May 2018 - 11:06 PM, said:

I have the Les Paul that I am running through a Marshall DSL 5CR. I always find myself using the bridge pickup because the neck sounds muddy in comparison. A couple of nights ago I saw Kenny Chesney in Austin and both his band and Old Domion (openers) always had their LPs in the bridge pickup too. I didn't see it once in any other position.

Is that was most people do, or when do you go for both or the neck? This is my first Gibson electric and i've only had it for a month or two. I (try to) play old school metal (maiden, Metallica, etc) and some country (Chesney, Aldean, Eric church).

Thanks!
Mike


Those Country Boys LOVE the Twangy/Hot/Brite sound Country music lends itself to, surprised they weren't all playing Fender's. Stapleton may be the only heavy country player I have heard in a long time, BUT I am not much of a Country listener. I find myself on the Rythm P-UP 90% of the time, and the rest on the MIDDLE position, seldom do I hit the Bridge P-UP by itself. That being because the LEAD/BRIDGE P-Up on my 2017 Les Paul STANDARD is way too hot for my taste's. When I am in the middle position I have the Brdige P-Up Tone control down around 4-5=TOPS......I used to dig the TWANG/Bright/HOT sound out of a DIRTY FINGERS Bridge position P-Up on my ole '79 'SG' but somehow, after hearing the way it sounded when I recorded myself,not so much.Since that revelation (1997?) It is the HEAVIER and FATTER SOUND/TONE I am after.
and GIBSON guitars are GOOD FOR THAT ! When I need a li'l brighter sound, I stay away from the Bridge and put the Treble on my amps above the 6 they are usually set at.
0

Share this topic:


  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users