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Peter Yarrow's and Paul Stookey's guitars

#1 User is offline   JefferySmith 

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 07:44 AM

This is way OT, but this IS the lounge. Back in the early 60's, both Peter Yarrow and Paul Stookey played acoustic guitars with slotted heads, so I assumed them both to be nylon string guitars. Do any of you old geezers know what models of guitars they were? I can't find a picture large enough to even guess the make. I know that in recent years Peter Yarrow started using what appears to be a steel-string acoustic as it does not have a slotted head (I didn't recognize the name, but I did read that it got stolen and returned).
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#2 User is offline   brianh 

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 08:02 AM

Seems to be a Martin D28S - "S" for slothead:

Posted Image

Posted Image

In 1954, the Martin Company again started building dreadnoughts with the elongated body and 12-fret neck, on a very limited basis. Designated with an "S" after the model number, the first few D-28S guitars were strictly special products.

The E.U. Wurlitzer Music Company of Boston ordered a few of these S-body guitars in 1962 to be sold only through their stores. The resulting D-28SW proved to be popular enough that, in 1968, Martin added it (and the D-18S and D-35S) to their regular line. All three models still are featured in the Martin catalog. According to Longworth, the factory has always given credit to Peter Yarrow (of the folk trio Peter, Paul & Mary) for popularizing the D-28S


http://www.themomi.o...read_Story.html

Funny, I used to shop at E.U. Wurlitzers when I was a lad living in Boston in the 70's. They were the biggest musical instrument company in the city, but were eventually given a thrashing by little upstarts, and now the big box retailers.
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#3 User is offline   JefferySmith 

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 08:09 AM

Good find. Thanks much. I've never seen a slot head Martin with steel strings, but there it is!
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#4 User is offline   Larens 

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 08:15 AM

[quote name='Jeffery Smith]Good find. Thanks much. I've never seen a slot head Martin with steel strings' date=' but there it is![/quote']

It should also be noted that the contemporary (post 1954) slot head Martins all have 12th fret neck/body joins...and slot heads previously were used on many steel string models...from the Vintage Guitar Guy site:

Slot Peghead vs. Solid Peghead (steel string models): Most models converted from a 12 fret slot peghead to a 14 fret solid peghead around 1934 (except the OM series, which went 14 fret in 1929/1930 and the style 17 and 18 models which were available in 14 fret style in 1932). Basically if the guitar has a 14 fret neck, it will have a solid peghead. If it has a 12 fret neck, it will have a slot peghead. Note there were some post-WW2 gut string and classical models (i.e. 0-16NY) and some post-WW2 special order steel string guitars (i.e. 1967-1993 D-18S) which always have a slotted peghead. "



Larens

#5 User is offline   Ron G 

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 10:15 AM

I was familiar with the slot-head steel string Martins, but I'm pretty sure that Stookey has mostly played nylon all these years.

#6 User is offline   JefferySmith 

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 10:19 AM

[quote name='Ron G]I was familiar with the slot-head steel string Martins' date=' but I'm pretty sure that Stookey has mostly played nylon all these years.[/quote']

I remember Stookey's guitar had a strange clear pickguard on it, like you see on a flamenco guitar.
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#7 User is offline   bluesman345 

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 06:59 AM

My first guitar (around 1966) was a sunburst slot-head Suzuki folk guitar. I remember the tuners creaking as I CRANKED them...
2004 MIK (Saein) Epi '56 Goldtop Les Paul (2 DiMarzio "Virtual P-90's"), with Bigsby B5 vibrato;
Gretsch Electromatic G5120 125th Anniversary Edition;
Simon & Patrick Woodland Cedar 6 acoustic with Dean Markley ProMag Grand soundhole acoustic pickup;
Vox Valvetronix AD50VT amp (50 watts);
Vox Valvetronix VT50 amp (50 watts) with 2 Celestion G-12 Hot-100 speakers;
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Boss GE-7 equalizer, Boss DR-5 Dr. Rhythm Section

#8 User is offline   charlie brown 

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 08:12 AM

Noel Paul Stookey's familiar "Classical" guitar was a 00-21 Martin. At least, according to the "Beginnings" article,
on PP&M's "beginnings."

http://www.peterpaul...f-ruhlmann1.htm

CB

#9 User is offline   JefferySmith 

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 09:03 AM

Quote

Noel Paul Stookey's familiar "Classical" guitar was a 00-21 Martin. At least, according the "Beginnings" article,
on PP&M's "beginnings."

http://www.peterpaul...f-ruhlmann1.htm

CB


Thanks for the link, Charlie. I was looking for this sort of thing since there seems to be no biography of any of them.
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#10 User is offline   charlie brown 

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 03:59 AM

Quote

Thanks for the link, Charlie. I was looking for this sort of thing since there seems to be no biography of any of them.



You're quite welcome, Jeff.

CB

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