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How much do you practice?

#81 User is offline   Josee 

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 03:26 AM

View Postgoldtop1, on 27 September 2014 - 09:54 PM, said:

keep in mind that when you practice you put a strain on the frets. If you over practice you'll need to have a leveling and re crown. It's hard to find a tech that can do this right. If you practice too much you will find that the guitar won't intonate properly. If you look closely you'll notice the frets begin to flatten out. This will create the pitch to be sharp on some frets and OK in others. It sounds great brand new but that's the issue. You'll have to buy a new guitar.


I'm mostly an acoustic player, I practice/play one to two hours a day (I keep the electric guitar sessions for an hour at night 2 or 3 times a week, with headphones, while plugged on a Boss Multi-Effects). I've started playing 3 years ago, but found a real passion in doing my own fretboard work (leveling and recrowning...and polishing the frets to a mirror shine!) about 6 months ago. I've leveled and re-crowned the frets of 4 guitars so far, and I'm proud of the final results. If changing strings is a chore, then doing your own fretwork won't be for you. Some people will have a real desire to learn how to do guitar repairs and modifications. If you're curious and you do a thorough check of the fretboard every time you change the strings, you will notice things. Like little dents on the frets. You may think the strings got digged into the frets by the Capo, but it didn't... It is normal wear, to some extent!

Practice makes perfect, no? How can you play or improve yourself if you don't practice?

Nobody told me and there is not a single tutorial for beginners I've watched where they make you practice your fretting touch. As an example, position your fingers for an open C chord as you normally do. Strum. Now, let your fingers rest lightly on top to mute the strings and strum it to compare the sound. Then, while strumming, start to apply pressure bit by bit on the strings until the C chord sounds perfect. You will notice that you don't have to press the strings all the way down to reach the wood of the fretboard, acoustic guitar or not! This is what you have to learn to control and be conscious about: the pressure you apply on the strings. This will help in developing "precision". Remember that a low action setup is suited for beginners and intermediates.

As for frets that begin to flatten, THIS IS NORMAL. Most guitars have nickel frets, which is a softer metal compared to stainless. That's why some player will eventually have a total re-fret done with stainless fret wires. Fret-leveling, crowning and polishing should be done once a year for a Professional player, but two to three times for a beginner's first year. Re-fretting is part of a Luthier's job description and it is considered as a "normal task". The real guitar practice that is needed and most won't do is the fretting touch by trying to discover your strength and be more conscious about the pressure of your fretting fingers over the strings/chords.

I've never heard anyone having to buy a new guitar because of "over-practicing". There's no such thing! A guitar needs care and requires regular maintenance, period.
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