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Problem with a 57' Classic Pickup

#1 User is offline   Ter 

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Posted 23 February 2011 - 11:00 AM

Hey guys, I'm new to the forums so first off I just want to say hello. I do have a problem so that's why I wanted to join and see if maybe someone can help me out. I recently bought new pickups for my 1999 Gibson Les Paul Custom. I put a PRS Tremonti Treble in the bridge and a Gibson 57' Classic double black pickup in the neck. The problem is that the neck pickup was bought from ebay and was supposed to be brand new and apparently is not because the height adjustment holes are slightly stripped and the lead wire was very short. The guy wont respond to my email and I didn't realize it was not new until after the 45 days because I was still gathering parts to hot rod the guitar so I got screwed. I had a tech extend the lead wire and we got it wired up and mounted but the pickup isn't working for some reason. The bridge sounds great but as soon as I switch to the neck it loses all output. If I put my amp on the distortion channel and really crank it you can barely hear a sound coming from the 57 Classic. I thought maybe it was a wiring problem so I put the old one back in and it works great. Any idea what would cause this to not have any output, I checked string height and all that stuff so it must be something internal in the pickup. Do you guys think I should just scrap it and buy another or is there a way to fix these? Any info would be appreciated. Thanks!

#2 User is offline   L5Larry 

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Posted 23 February 2011 - 12:55 PM

View PostTer, on 23 February 2011 - 11:00 AM, said:

I had a tech extend the lead wire and we got it wired up and mounted but the pickup isn't working for some reason.


Testing the pickup for a "shorted" or "open" coil takes an ohm meter. There are a few possibilities as to when/where/how/why your pickup doesn't work, including having bought a blown pickup, a problem with the wire extension, the installation, the selector switch, a bad potentiometer, etc. Take the pickup (or the entire guitar) back to your "tech" to have him sort it out.

Edit: after a re-read, if your "tech" was involved in the installation and doesn't know why it doesn't work, you need to find a new or "real" guitar technician.

#3 User is offline   Farnsbarns 

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 01:03 PM

View PostL5Larry, on 23 February 2011 - 12:55 PM, said:


Edit: after a re-read, if your "tech" was involved in the installation and doesn't know why it doesn't work, you need to find a new or "real" guitar technician.


Here here!

There must be continuity if you can just hear it at very high amp levels to it is probably a short in a coil. You could try taking a few windings of each as if you can only just here a signal at full tilt on your amp then any short must be fairly near the beginning of the coil.

The other thing that comes to mind is that your ebay man might have been a bit thick and rewound it with uninsulated coper wire meaning you have, in effect, got one turn. That would also explain the slight signal at very high volumes.

A pick up is, in principle, really simple. This might be your opportunity to try pickup winding!
The early worm get's caught. Are you sure you're the bird?

Farns

#4 User is offline   stein 

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 01:20 PM

Just an educated guess that if the lead was replaced, that is the problem. Coated wire can easily look like it is making a connection when it isn't, and it is not the easiest solder connection to make.

#5 User is offline   Farnsbarns 

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 07:35 PM

View Poststein, on 15 March 2011 - 01:20 PM, said:

Just an educated guess that if the lead was replaced, that is the problem. Coated wire can easily look like it is making a connection when it isn't, and it is not the easiest solder connection to make.


Agreed! Look at that first. try cutting the lead off, trimming the coil wire back to good clean wire, then pinch the end of it with some fine grade sand paper and pull the sand paper off the end, do this 2 or 3 times to clean the clear coating of the coil wire and re-solder.
The early worm get's caught. Are you sure you're the bird?

Farns

#6 User is offline   Searcy 

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:44 AM

You can tell if the connections are good or not with a meter. No need to start reworking solder joints that might not be the problem.

#7 User is offline   Fringe Lunatic 

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 01:16 PM

With some tape, you could temporarily connect the pickup leads to the plug of a guitar cable (polarity doesn't matter), and plug it directly into your amp, bypassing all of the other electronics. Might tell you a lot.
If you don't like your guitar's tone, get a new amp

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