Gibson Brands Forums: new SG's still have PCB's - Gibson Brands Forums

Jump to content

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

new SG's still have PCB's

#1 User is offline   ics1974 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 167
  • Joined: 15-January 09

Posted 29 February 2012 - 04:59 PM

Anyone know if Gibson is still using pcb's on new SG's. I am thinking of getting a 2011 Natural Burst SG but what to know before buying.
0

#2 User is offline   strat-o-steve 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 532
  • Joined: 18-December 10
  • LocationNC

Posted 02 March 2012 - 05:43 AM

Of course they are. Almost every "standard" production guitar they make has the PCB board. It speeds up production by making the electronics a simple, drop in unit. There's nothing wrong with it, as long as you like the pickups that came in the guitar. Even then, you can buy special plugs to allow you to simply unplug the old pups, and plug in the new ones. It only becomes a hassle if you have a pot go bad or something. I have 2 Gibbys with the PCB and they are fine guitars. The other 2 have the traditional point to point wiring. This is inevitable, progress, call it what you will......anything to speed production and lower production costs! (Make more, faster, for less) LOL.
0

#3 User is offline   rainbowdemon427 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 17-January 09

Posted 03 March 2012 - 03:18 AM

Ah, but are they proper PCB's as we know them? Or do they simply have volume and tone pots and capacitors mounted on a board for ease of assembly?

If so, one wonders why they didn't think of doing it years ago.
0

#4 User is offline   strat-o-steve 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 532
  • Joined: 18-December 10
  • LocationNC

Posted 03 March 2012 - 12:53 PM

The PCB in my LP Studio and SG Special seem to be good stuff. Only time will tell though. The pots still have the Gibson logos, and seem to be about the same pots used as before the PCB. I suppose if a fella were good with a soldering iron, changing parts on the PCB wouldn't be so hard at all...... [huh]
1

#5 User is offline   Reynolds_wRap 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 17-March 08

Posted 03 March 2012 - 08:11 PM

Idk, the PCB guitar I played muddied up when I rolled off the volume knob.....maybe I'm just picky
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Guitars:
Gibson SG Standard
Gibson SG Faded
Gibson SG VOS Standard (2)
Gibson SG 61 Reissue
Gibson SG Kirk Douglas Signature
1971 Gibson SG Standard
1967 Gretsch Double Anniversary
Gretsch 5445
0

#6 User is offline   rainbowdemon427 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 17-January 09

Posted 04 March 2012 - 03:32 AM

There is no PCB (printed circuit board) inside a Gibson guitar. It's simply an alloy plate with the pots and capacitors on it. Built as a unit for ease of production.

See here for a Les Paul example. If you can see any printed circuits, let me know.

Posted Image
0

#7 User is offline   Searcy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 8713
  • Joined: 21-March 10
  • LocationNashville

Posted 04 March 2012 - 07:57 AM

Lots of Gibson guitars have PCBs. Here's the one in my SG.

Posted Image
0

#8 User is offline   rainbowdemon427 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 17-January 09

Posted 04 March 2012 - 08:04 AM

View PostSearcy, on 04 March 2012 - 07:57 AM, said:

Lots of Gibson guitars have PCBs. Here's the one in my SG.

Posted Image


Is that a new thing they are doing? Never seen one before. Presumably a further move down the road for mass production?
0

#9 User is offline   Searcy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 8713
  • Joined: 21-March 10
  • LocationNashville

Posted 04 March 2012 - 08:12 AM

Gibsons are already mass produced. I've only seen the PCB in the lower end guitars but it might be in some other. It's just a way to keep costs down. If they were smart they would offer different plug and play boards with options such as coil spliting and phasing and such as after market hot rod options. I might do that myself now that I think of it.
0

#10 User is offline   dubstar 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1117
  • Joined: 27-December 07

Posted 04 March 2012 - 11:07 PM

when did this start? my SG special faded certainly doesn't have anything like that...
0

#11 User is offline   rainbowdemon427 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 17-January 09

Posted 05 March 2012 - 02:12 AM

Never seen that before either. I imagine that there's no real componentry apart from the usual pots and caps (correct me if I'm wrong, someone), they just seem to be using a piece of board to mount it all on, and using plugs instead of soldering some connections. No reason why they shouldn't, it's probably what any mass producer would do, and frankly it's surprising why they didn't do it years ago.

As for coil-tapping or hot-rodding Searcy, I can't see how a board necessarily makes that any easier to do, it was always an option for anyone with a soldering iron, the right components, and some wire. Go for it!
0

#12 User is offline   Searcy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 8713
  • Joined: 21-March 10
  • LocationNashville

Posted 05 March 2012 - 06:07 AM

View Postdubstar, on 04 March 2012 - 11:07 PM, said:

when did this start? my SG special faded certainly doesn't have anything like that...


The one pictured above is in a 2008 SG Special Faded. That's the first year I know of that they started using these types of boards.
0

#13 User is offline   Searcy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 8713
  • Joined: 21-March 10
  • LocationNashville

Posted 05 March 2012 - 06:15 AM

I imagine that there's no real componentry apart from the usual pots and caps (correct me if I'm wrong, someone), they just seem to be using a piece of board to mount it all on, and using plugs instead of soldering some connections.

The boards are being used they typical way PCBs are used. The componentry is what you would expect to find in an SG or Les Paul style guitar.

As for coil-tapping or hot-rodding Searcy, I can't see how a board necessarily makes that any easier to do, it was always an option for anyone with a soldering iron, the right components, and some wire.

It would make it easier in the sence that you would not have to know how to solder or what the right components are or how to put them together.
0

#14 User is offline   jwsamuel 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 37
  • Joined: 26-December 07

Posted 05 March 2012 - 10:13 PM

Is there any reason you can't pull everything out and replace it with new pots, new pickups and new wiring?

Jim
0

#15 User is offline   rainbowdemon427 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 17-January 09

Posted 06 March 2012 - 03:02 AM

Searcy, you still need to solder components to a PCB! The pathways are etched, that's all, check out the Les Paul photo. But if you wanted to simply change a pot or cap, then I would agree that theoretically it could be easier, but you'd need to de-solder the original from the board first, they don't just plug in.

Jim, there's no reason why you shouldn't do that, either using the PCB board, or reverting back to the old tried and trusted method we all know and love so well. The introduction of a PCB to mount the kit on doesn't improve the sound, it's just a manufacturing shortcut. It cuts out the need to employ someone to solder all the electric guts together once they're in the guitar. The ground wire from the bridge, the pickup wires, and the output jack are all fitted with plugs, which simply plug in to the board. It must cut guitar production time down significantly.

Posted Image
0

#16 User is offline   Searcy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 8713
  • Joined: 21-March 10
  • LocationNashville

Posted 06 March 2012 - 04:49 AM

View Postrainbowdemon427, on 06 March 2012 - 03:02 AM, said:

Searcy, you still need to solder components to a PCB! The pathways are etched, that's all, check out the Les Paul photo. But if you wanted to simply change a pot or cap, then I would agree that theoretically it could be easier, but you'd need to de-solder the original from the board first, they don't just plug in.



What? [blink] I never suggested that Gibson or others makers offer up after market PCBs with no components attached to them. What would be the point of that? When you buy a new mother borad you don't have to solder all the components to it do you?

Fully assembled, plug and play, after market PBCs would allow players with very little technical knowledge to mod their own guitars fast and easy. For example you could have a board with 1959 spec pot values and caps. Then you could have another with push pull pots for coil tapping with 300K pots and to on. EMG could offer a board to go with their active pickups with 25K pots and pair it with a new back Les Paul or SG cavity cover with a battery box installed.

It's a cheep and easy way for Gibson to offer their customers more flexibility in shaping their own tone without having to pay a guy like me to rewire their guitars just to see what it might sound like.
0

#17 User is offline   jwsamuel 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 37
  • Joined: 26-December 07

Posted 06 March 2012 - 06:09 AM

View PostSearcy, on 06 March 2012 - 04:49 AM, said:

Fully assembled, plug and play, after market PBCs would allow players with very little technical knowledge to mod their own guitars fast and easy. For example you could have a board with 1959 spec pot values and caps. Then you could have another with push pull pots for coil tapping with 300K pots and to on. EMG could offer a board to go with their active pickups with 25K pots and pair it with a new back Les Paul or SG cavity cover with a battery box installed.


That's kind of what Taylor does with its electrics. The pickups are a plug connection so you can buy multiple pickguard/pickup assemblies. Just unplug one and plug another in and you have a different pickup configuration.

Jim
0

#18 User is offline   rainbowdemon427 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 91
  • Joined: 17-January 09

Posted 06 March 2012 - 11:09 AM

View PostSearcy, on 06 March 2012 - 04:49 AM, said:

What? [blink] I never suggested that Gibson or others makers offer up after market PCBs with no components attached to them. What would be the point of that? When you buy a new mother borad you don't have to solder all the components to it do you?

Fully assembled, plug and play, after market PBCs would allow players with very little technical knowledge to mod their own guitars fast and easy. For example you could have a board with 1959 spec pot values and caps. Then you could have another with push pull pots for coil tapping with 300K pots and to on. EMG could offer a board to go with their active pickups with 25K pots and pair it with a new back Les Paul or SG cavity cover with a battery box installed.

It's a cheep and easy way for Gibson to offer their customers more flexibility in shaping their own tone without having to pay a guy like me to rewire their guitars just to see what it might sound like.



Ah, NOW I see where you were going with that! [thumbup]
0

#19 User is offline   blues4jesus 

  • Newbie
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 17-May 09

Posted 11 March 2014 - 04:20 AM

I have 2011 SG with the PCB and the bridge pickup sounded weak. As I always replace pickups no problem. I installed my David Allen Powerage pups and the neck was incredible but the bride sounded weak which is not typical. So re-adjust pups hight all the norm settings still huge difference in tone. My tech recommended just traditional wireing and to pull the pcb. which I did and whoah what a difference. Might be faster for Gibson but making good stuff isn't about speed its quality. Im no fan [thumbdn] of the newer way Gibson is doing their factory installs, I would bet if anybody did the same they also would notice better tone. Some things in my opinion don't need upgrade I do like the plug in idea which you don't need a pcb to do so.Heres a suggestion how about lower prices and better quality?? [thumbup] =D>
0

#20 User is offline   Searcy 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 8713
  • Joined: 21-March 10
  • LocationNashville

Posted 11 March 2014 - 05:25 AM

If the caps and pot values are all the same, there is no sonic difference between a guitar with a PCB and a guitar with wire in it. Quality wise, you are more likely to get consistant results from a mass produced PCB than you are from 20 hourly laborers slapping parts into widgets on a line all day.
0

Share this topic:


  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users