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World's largest Coyote shot here Calls coming in from worldwide

#1 User is offline   bonzoboy 

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 03:38 PM

A local hunting supply store recently started a contest with prizes for the biggest coyote shot.Last weekend a hunter shot a coyote that weighed in at 82 lbs. the previous world record was 76 lbs. shot in Wyoming I believe they said.They have sent blood and tissue samples away to be tested by wildlife specialists as they think that it may be a coyote/wolf hybrid.Coyotes didn't appear on the island until about 15 years ago when several crossed over from mainland Canada on the sea ice and since then the population as exploded.The last wolf in the province was killed in 1928 and that was a tragedy as the Newfoundland wolf was a seperate species.From pix I've seen of the animal it appears to be more wolflike than like a coyote.You can see for yourself here: http://www.cbc.ca/nl/
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#2 User is offline   MissouriPicker 

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 03:43 PM

I'm no wildlife expert, but that's a wolf. Not a hybrid coyote or hybrid wolf. It's a wolf.....I think.
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#3 User is offline   Cruznolfart 

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 03:44 PM

Dayum it's a biggun for sure, Bonz. That business about them being extinct should be taken with a grain of salt, though. We've seen wolf and badger here in southern Oregon and have been told repeatedly by those who know such things that they're both extinct here. Ho hum. [wink]



#4 User is offline   mikekefr 

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 05:05 PM

 MissouriPicker, on 15 March 2012 - 03:43 PM, said:

I'm no wildlife expert, but that's a wolf. Not a hybrid coyote or hybrid wolf. It's a wolf.....I think.

+1 on that,coyotes have been knockin off cattle here in po'dunk,and they look like med. sized dogs and hunt in packs,hunters/homeowners kill them and drag them to the road for whoever wants the pelt or buzzards,first come first serve,i would have to agree that monster is a wolf,im no wildlife expert either but im glad to hear he's dead.He looks like something ya dont wanna come across w/out your sidearm [thumbup]
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#5 User is offline   bonzoboy 

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 05:57 PM

Sorry guys but some of you are mistaken,DNA analysis of most of these animals caught so far have confirmed that they are indeed a hybrid of the eastern coyote and the grey wolf or in the cases of smaller ones pure blooded coyotes.Prior to about 15 years ago the last wild indigenous member of the canine family was the Newfoundland wolf killed in 1928 by a hunter visiting from England.From then until the recent coyote sightings there hasn't been a single sighting of a wolf or coyote on the island part of the province since 1928 and that's according to the director of the Department Of Wildlife.That's why people are speculating that this animal is a hybrid because of the sheer size of it.BTW a wolf won't attack a human and there has never been a documented wolf attack on a human in North America but conversely a coyote or wolf/coyote hybrid will attack humans.I am a paid up memberésupporter of CPAWS and The Canadian Wildlife Federation both organizations are commited to protecting the wolf and its habitat and it`s because of my love of wolves that I`ve done such a large ammount of research on them.We`ll know the true DNA makeup of this particular animal when the lab reports come back.

BTW just last summer a young lady who was an up and coming Canadian singer was attacked and killed by 3 coyotes in a Nova Scotia park.
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#6 User is offline   upsidedown club 

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 06:06 PM

I am going with the wolfote side heavy on the wolf . Its so remarkable how wolves can be so varied within the species all those different dogs and then this beast, probably better make sure there arent more like that one is right. secondly that cancer ad on the home page was borderline vulger ... save a butt...ok but do I have to see it..lol
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#7 User is offline   LarryUK 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 01:42 AM

This hunting thing is sick. Who gets enjoyment from killing? No wonder you get so many murders.

#8 User is offline   upsidedown club 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 04:26 AM

to provide and protect is the opposite of sick
c


#9 User is offline   bonzoboy 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:00 AM

@ Lashurst I agree with you 100% I could never bring myself to cause the death of any other creature with a pulse and personally abhor guns and would never own one.We don't necessarily have a need for them here because we have the lowest incident rate of gun violence in North America and that's from the statistics of the North American Association of Chiefs of Police .I don't go along with killing an animal for "sport" no more than I'd go along with killing a human for the same reason,I see no sport in causing death.Having said that if I absolutely had to for the sake of keeping myself alive I may be driven to it but since we are able to go to a supermarket and buy whatever food we like that's highly unlikely.I know that I'm going draw a lot of "fire" for this but I follow the teachings of Ghandi and have adopted his creedo of "Reverence for Life." A lot of my relatives and all of my in-laws hunt and so be it,I don't give them flak for what they choose to do and they respect my point of view also.I also am a member of several organizations dedicated to the protection of wolves and their habitat and give a considerable amount of money to these groups.As our native brothers believe I too believe that we have a kinship with the wolf.
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#10 User is offline   G McBride 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:25 AM

Starting to sound like "We the Sheeple".

Sometimes it is kill or be killed, just the way of the wild.



#11 User is offline   LarryUK 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 05:48 AM

I agree with kill or be killed. But to kill for fun is sick.

#12 User is offline   Duende 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 06:22 AM

 lashurst, on 16 March 2012 - 05:48 AM, said:

I agree with kill or be killed. But to kill for fun is sick.


I am with you there - hunt to eat, fine - defend yourself or your family - fine, but to go out and make a game of it disgusts me.

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#13 User is offline   Searcy 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 06:40 AM

 pippy, on 16 March 2012 - 05:59 AM, said:

I must have missed the bit where the "avid coyote hunter" provided something to someone. Other than a dead animal to be stuffed and put on display in the hunting shop, of course.

Protecting people from a dangerous animal is perfectly understandable as is hunting for food but, clearly, neither scenario was the case here. He simply went out to kill something.

North American Wolves almost never attack, humans and, as far as I can ascertain, the most recent occasion a human was reported as having been killed in a coyote attack was 2009.

Domestic dogs, OTOH, attack and/or kill hundreds of people each year. Should we kill all our pet dogs?

P.


Killing coyotes is a public service. I've killed a few of them in my day. Once you see a hunting pack of them take down one of your calves they don't seem like little puppy dogs any more. They are aggressive. The kill live stock, pets and small children. In the U.S. there aren't many places where there are many natural predictors for Coyotes. They are increasingly inching their way into urban and suburban areas so their population must be kept in check. This is why more areas have pretty aggressive hunting policies regarding them.


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#14 User is offline   davidl 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 06:44 AM

In a somewhat related issue (wildlife), I've heard that there are more moose on the island than people. When I was there, I never saw one but sure saw a lot of roadside memorials. A result of collisions. Around my place you don't get that many collisions with moose (definitely some) but deer are hit regularly. We get deer in the yard a few times a year and we're barely out of the city.
The wolf population around here has diminished to almost nil. Urban sprawl. But Coyotes are seen regularly and are a real concern.

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#15 User is offline   mikekefr 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 07:06 AM

My reference using the word 'hunters' previously,meant deer hunters..deer hunters use dogs here,and when/if the dogs get on a coyote,they usually end up takin it down,...there was one cattle farm that lost i believe 'in the high 20's' cattle due to coyotes last year.At that point they become more than just a nuisance imo..the farmers have to look at it like they do w/ deer damage stamps..just more intense and more money lost per head vs. damaged corn from deer.When the farmer/sherrif's office went public for help,you can imagaine the numbers that came,they hunted round the clock and in shifts as i heard it..add in a few reports of pets being lost,which leads to the threat of small children..imo thats when any preservation for the animal gets thrown out the window.Just my .02
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#16 User is offline   Searcy 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 07:31 AM

 pippy, on 16 March 2012 - 07:21 AM, said:

These are the official figures from the United Kingdom's governmental office, The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs;

  • In England in 2008/09, there were over 5,000 hospital admissions resulting from being bitten or struck by a dog (excludes people treated in minor injury units (MIU) or accident and emergency (A&E) departments, without being admitted as an inpatient).
  • In 2009, dog attacks on people in England cost the Health Service £3.3 million.
  • Estimate of 6,000 dog attacks on postmen/women each year.

That's an astonishing 11,000 attacks per year! How many attacks by coyotes do you have per year, do you reckon?

This is after, please note, a ban on four species of dog came into place in 1991 outlawing ownership of those breeds deemed to be too dangerous to the general public following a series of savage killings by these types of animal.

So, again; should we kill all pet dogs - "preservation for the animal" as you put it - just to be on the safe side?

P.


If they are feral dogs and their population is growing at such a rate that they must become more and more aggressive in order to find food then the answer is yes. Kill the domestic dogs. As far as tame pet dogs go, most any pet dog that aggressively harms a human in the U.S. will be put down.

#17 User is offline   Searcy 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 08:14 AM

View Postpippy, on 16 March 2012 - 07:50 AM, said:

Unfortunately the attack figures don't break down into 'Feral' and 'Domestic' but there's not a great problem as far as the number of feral dogs in the UK is concerned. Cats, yes. Loads of them. But there are not too many feral dogs even in London. Certainly the 6,000 reported attacks on postmen/women will be, I suspect, down to domestic 'pets'.

If the attack is found to have been very severe then, as in the U.S., the animal will be put down.

But therein lies the difference; coyotes can be hunted and killed because, in theory, they might pose a potential threat at some future time despite there being almost no occasions when any attack against a human has taken place.

Dogs, on the other hand - even although there are 11,000 attacks on humans per year - are not thought to pose any threat!

How does that make sense?

Can I just say that I like dogs and am not calling for a summary execution of these animals! [smile]

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Well, I don't believe that North American hunting laws are written just to take out potential predictors before they hurt someone. They are designed to maintain a balance in the wild population. It's the conservationist approach.

For example when I was young and lived in the Florida Everglades there was a huge population if Key Deer. As vicious critters go these tiny animals are a threat to no one. Years of hunting bans and a lack of natural predators (Florida panthers) saw the population swell to massive numbers which put a strain on the types of plants that the animal likes to eat. All it took was a few years of drought in the 80's and some massive wild fires and the huge herds started starving to death. Attempts were made to drop hay bails into the swamp to feed them but it wasn't enough. Attempts to catch them were made but trying to catch tiny wild deer in a huge swap is not workable. Finally the state allowed for a limited open hunting season to thin the population to a manageable number. That worked. I believe that system is still in used today but I'm not 100% sure.

I'm sure Canada is keeping track of the coyote population and adjusting it's hunting limits accordingly.

#18 User is offline   upsidedown club 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 08:31 AM

ok pippy my post was not meant to be specific to the one article ,pardon the too broad of a reply. As a sportsman all my life I can tell you that it has always been looked on as dishonorable to not use the prey, in a meaning full way. As for bloodthirsty souls with guns of course ...feared and loathed. Many animals are controled population for their own good by our governments. But bottom line for me. hunting is moral and positive.
c


#19 User is offline   surfpup 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 08:43 AM

Disclaimer: I'm not particularly pro or anti hunting. I have hunted some and fished a lot. However I find some of the semantics of this conversation interesting.

Men hunting deer = sportsmen
Coyotes hunting livestock = viscous predators

#20 User is offline   Searcy 

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 09:07 AM

Right, so killing off all the foxes was bad for the balance of the local ecosystem.

It's a tricky thing to balance but I think that most states in the U.S. do a decent job. Here, hunters are willing to pay for the privilege to hunt in the form of licenses and taxes. They invest money in their gear just like we invest in guitars. If they are caught poaching the resulting sentences are usually harsh. Your equipment is seized and many times you can be banned from hunting for life and do some jail time. As it should be.

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