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'67 B-25 adj bridge FIX

#1 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:54 PM

Hey all! I have in for repair a late '60 Gibson B25.
It has an adjustable saddle rosewood bridge that appears to be original. It looks 'oversize' to most Gibby bridges that I have seem. It has pulled up and developed cracks from the ends to the adj-post holes....pics to follow.
My intention will be to remove the bridge and flatten and glue the lateral cracks and them' hot hideglue' it to the top.
If I cannot make that work, then I will seek a re-placement.
Any thoughts or suggestions?
Rod
Posted Image

http://[img]http//i1306.photobucket.com/albums/s573/retrorod53/IMG_1408_zpscc1ef615.jpg[/img]My link
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#2 User is offline   jedzep 

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 03:47 AM

Looks like you have things under control Rod. I think I would have opted for a new bridge and fixed saddle if the bridge on mine had ever come unglued, including removal of the threaded sleeves from the top. I ended up rigging the bridge with my own concoction. Since you already have cracks in the bridge, why don't you consider the makeover right off the bat?
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#3 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 04:47 AM

I will definitely have another talk with the owner about doing that. It makes sense to me and would be one less step in the repair process.
I think that when I finally remove the bridge I will be able to make the case for re-placing with a fixed saddle bridge.
Everything else on the guitar is 'straight-up' and in very nice condition.
I am trying to link another pic from the top-view
Rod

http://[img]http//i1306.photobucket.com/albums/s573/retrorod53/IMG_1408_zpscc1ef615.jpg[/img]Posted Image
"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."--Cormic McCarthy

Celebrating the sixty years of "white privilege" that i have just recently learned that I was born with...

#4 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 04:59 AM

http://[img]http//i1306.photobucket.com/albums/s573/retrorod53/IMG_1415_zpsc8edebba.jpg[/img]Posted Image
"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."--Cormic McCarthy

Celebrating the sixty years of "white privilege" that i have just recently learned that I was born with...

#5 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 06:28 AM

I have decided to scrap the idea of replacing the existing bridge and am having a replacement made with a bone saddle. My decision was made when removing the screws from the adjustable saddle, the bass side screw sheared at the bushing. I have wrestled the bridge off and will next remove the bushings and plug the holes.
Anyone have any helpfull advice/tips on the easiest and safest way to remove the bushings?? I am assuming that they will remove from the top and have some ideas on the best way to do that.....but I always like to gather info first.
I was hoping that Travis (Music Zoo Repairs) would weigh in also.
Will try to get some pics of the progress up soon.
Rod
"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."--Cormic McCarthy

Celebrating the sixty years of "white privilege" that i have just recently learned that I was born with...

#6 User is offline   Mustache Guitar Repairs 

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 11:48 AM

Hi Rod, sorry I didn't chime in earlier. It's a shame about the adjustable screws, but it's when unexpected **** like this happens during jobs that you really get more learning experience out of it. If you can't back the screw out from above or below, then there's not much you can do besides cutting/drilling them out (not so fun and won't be pretty), or rig up something to press them out like bearing cups on a bicycle.

You can make a pretty simple little press with some scrap wood, a dowel, and a clamp that lets you add gradual pressure (preferably not a cam-clamp). Bear with me since I don't have any pictures or measurements:

The upper block will need to be at least 1/4" bigger than the bushing all the way around, at least 1" tall, and have a hole drilled in it also slightly bigger than the bushing and about 1/2" deep.

The bottom block can be a little bit smaller than the other one, and will need to be drilled and have a section of dowel (slightly smaller in diameter to the bushing) protruding 1/4-3/8" from the block. Dry fit the two to make sure there's enough room in the upper block to fit the bottom dowel and the bushing as well.

Let your soldering iron heat up, and then hold it on the bushing for a few minutes to soften the glue (like you would when removing a fret, but longer since you want the metal will retain some heat). You should be able to push them right out after that, maybe having to add a little heat to the bushing again if it starts to cool off too quickly.

And if that all goes smoothly you should be able to fill the holes and continue on with the repair, can't wait to see how it comes out.

Hope this helps you out,
Travis

#7 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:43 PM

Just an update on the B25....This what I am ending up with at this time....
My linkhttp://i1306.photobu...zps308c84ac.jpg

After removal of the bushings...

My linkhttp://i1306.photobu...zps6713e51b.jpg

A shot of the "aircraft carrier" landing deck size of a bridge plate that Gibson used at that time.....better than 1/8" thick also...Yikes!...

My linkhttp://i1306.photobu...zpsa63abc66.jpg

Could not resist a shot in the wonderfull North Carolina blue sky in February....She is like a naked lady ...ready to be saddled...
OMG, I wax poetic....[scared]

My linkhttp://i1306.photobu...zps33e4953e.jpg
"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."--Cormic McCarthy

Celebrating the sixty years of "white privilege" that i have just recently learned that I was born with...

#8 User is offline   jedzep 

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 06:32 PM

Look at you! You're building an LG2.
I try to think, but nothin happens. ( Jerome 'Curly' Howard )

#9 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 05:41 PM

LG2, it is....only built by Gibson, quite a bit 'heavier' than the good old early ones.....should be a vast improvement though with a a bone nut and saddle...!
We will see.
"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."--Cormic McCarthy

Celebrating the sixty years of "white privilege" that i have just recently learned that I was born with...

#10 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:46 AM

Thought I might add some more pics, as I have finished this repair and there is another topic of similar nature on the Acoustic Section.

http://i1306.photobu...zps6486b5c0.jpg

As you can see, this is a 'sizeable' bridge pad and looks to me to be a real chore to remove. After seeing that the ball ends of the strings were sinking into the pad pretty badly, I opted to make and glue-in a bridge pad overlay of maple(I forgot to get a picture) It was a small rectangle with beveled edges and thinner than the 1/8" bridge pad.
The ball ends sit proud of this overlay now and I am not concerned with 'rip-out'.
I don,t think that the overlay effected tone, as the guitar is rather heavily built anyway!

The following are some pics of the replacement bridge and saddle....

Posted ImagePosted Image
"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."--Cormic McCarthy

Celebrating the sixty years of "white privilege" that i have just recently learned that I was born with...

#11 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:58 AM

...A couple more....

These were taken while still adjusting the pin holes for proper fit...

I don,t have a picture of the final pin fit downloaded ....but with the bridge pad overlay there is virtually no string wraps showing and bending towards the saddle now...
Posted Image


Posted Image
"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."--Cormic McCarthy

Celebrating the sixty years of "white privilege" that i have just recently learned that I was born with...

#12 User is offline   Mustache Guitar Repairs 

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:06 AM

That's a good lookin bridge

#13 User is offline   retrorod 

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 03:05 PM

I agree! I was quite pleased with this guys work and the price and turn-around time was excellant! He is located in Vermont. I can give you contact info, if you ever need a re-placement bridge for one of your repairs. [smile]
"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."--Cormic McCarthy

Celebrating the sixty years of "white privilege" that i have just recently learned that I was born with...

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