Gibson Guitar Board: Elusive B20? - Gibson Guitar Board

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Elusive B20? Help me type this old Gibson

#1 User is offline   ann 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 14-February 13

Posted 14 February 2013 - 06:27 PM

AOK - - Here we have what I *think* may be a Gibson B20 from all I've read online.

It has x bracing, is smaller than a full sized B25 - yet not quite as small as a "student" guitar, and the body isn't the student guitar shape.
I don't know what the exact sizing of a B20 is - and there is no clue on the guitar itself besides the serial number which indicates it was made in Kalamazoo in the right date range for a B20.

I LOVE the sound of this Gibson!
OK since I can only upload one image - even at 72 dpi - here are a few more clues.
- I recently had to replace the tuning pegs with metal Klusons as one of the metal posts got bent and broke on the original the cream colored "butter bean style" nobs it had. Also the Gibson logo on the head stock is mother of pearl colored rather than gold or black which seems rare/odd.

In case it's another clue - these original tuners had GIBSON DELUXE engraved on the back of each tuner which were 3 in a line style.

Pictures follow (if I can figure out how to upload more than one at a time)
--- Anyone out there have a guitar like this one? - Thanks in advance!

Attached Image: body_view_72.jpg

#2 User is offline   zombywoof 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4928
  • Joined: 24-January 08

Posted 14 February 2013 - 06:46 PM

I don't know much about the B-20 other than they were an 00 size guitar. They were made in Kalamzoo and were X braced but I assume have the Norlin-era heavy version. Most say Gibson offered them only from 1971-1972. Others though say they were made from 1971-1974. All agree that about 500 were made.
__________________________________________________


"I play so rough - I stomp 'em"
Bukka White

#3 User is offline   duluthdan 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 2515
  • Joined: 19-February 12
  • LocationAspen, Colorado

Posted 14 February 2013 - 07:45 PM

View Postann, on 14 February 2013 - 06:27 PM, said:

AOK - - Here we have what I *think* may be a Gibson B20 from all I've read online.

It has x bracing, is smaller than a full sized B25 - yet not quite as small as a "student" guitar, and the body isn't the student guitar shape.
I don't know what the exact sizing of a B20 is - and there is no clue on the guitar itself besides the serial number which indicates it was made in Kalamazoo in the right date range for a B20.

I LOVE the sound of this Gibson!
OK since I can only upload one image - even at 72 dpi - here are a few more clues.
- I recently had to replace the tuning pegs with metal Klusons as one of the metal posts got bent and broke on the original the cream colored "butter bean style" nobs it had. Also the Gibson logo on the head stock is mother of pearl colored rather than gold or black which seems rare/odd.

In case it's another clue - these original tuners had GIBSON DELUXE engraved on the back of each tuner which were 3 in a line style.

Pictures follow (if I can figure out how to upload more than one at a time)
--- Anyone out there have a guitar like this one? - Thanks in advance!

Attachment body_view_72.jpg

Ann - take a look at this, it will help you post more photos. http://forum.gibson....to-post-photos/
Smile Fierce !!!
Gibson J-45 TV
Gibson Jackson Browne
Martin 1937 D-18A
Gibson SJ-200
Gibson J-45 Legend

#4 User is offline   ann 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 14-February 13

Posted 15 February 2013 - 05:28 PM

Thanks for the pointer to the image loading tip - knew I was missing something there...

Here are more pics... starting with a nicer one of the front...

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

I believe it has mahogany back and sides, spruce top...
Body is 19.5 inches tall, avg 4.5 inches deep, Lower bout 14.5 inches wide, middle 9.75, top, 11.25, neck 20.5 (from top of body to top of head stock). Total length just under 40 inches (the neck is really 20 and 3/8's)

The fellow I purchased it from told me that the original owner he bought her from had the adjustable bridge replaced with the solid wooden one - but that is foggy. As mentioned, I just replaced the original gibson deluxe tuners with the metal butter beans of the exact same size (thank god they fit with a little coaxing and the new rings were too fat so I re-used the originals).

So - what do you guys think? a 3/4 sized B25? a B20? other? --- Thanks in advance I sure appreciate knowing what I have here sn is embossed black ink under varnish 965567 with Made in U.S.A below the sn.

Notice the Gibson logo which is faux mother of pearl is missing the dot over the i as well.... but this seems common for a few years according to research.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts - - SO GLAD I found this cool forum by the way!
A

#5 User is offline   QuestionMark 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 531
  • Joined: 27-December 07

Posted 16 February 2013 - 04:23 PM

View Postann, on 15 February 2013 - 05:28 PM, said:

Thanks for the pointer to the image loading tip - knew I was missing something there...

Here are more pics... starting with a nicer one of the front...

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

I believe it has mahogany back and sides, spruce top...
Body is 19.5 inches tall, avg 4.5 inches deep, Lower bout 14.5 inches wide, middle 9.75, top, 11.25, neck 20.5 (from top of body to top of head stock). Total length just under 40 inches (the neck is really 20 and 3/8's)

The fellow I purchased it from told me that the original owner he bought her from had the adjustable bridge replaced with the solid wooden one - but that is foggy. As mentioned, I just replaced the original gibson deluxe tuners with the metal butter beans of the exact same size (thank god they fit with a little coaxing and the new rings were too fat so I re-used the originals).

So - what do you guys think? a 3/4 sized B25? a B20? other? --- Thanks in advance I sure appreciate knowing what I have here sn is embossed black ink under varnish 965567 with Made in U.S.A below the sn.

Notice the Gibson logo which is faux mother of pearl is missing the dot over the i as well.... but this seems common for a few years according to research.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts - - SO GLAD I found this cool forum by the way!
A


I've on occasion seen these guitars at vintage guitar shows. I believe they are later models of LG-0s, where circa 1969/70 the LG-0's mahagony top was replaced by a spruce top and continued on being made with th spruce top until very early 70s. A Norlin era change to the traditionally made mahogany top of its LG-0. Or...they are B-15s from about the same era. Both had the same dimensions and pretty much resembled each other, with the B-15 selling for less due to some cost cutting features which I included a narrower Gibson headstock. I looked up the LG-0 an B-15 in the book Gibsons Fabulous Guitars which references the B-15 having had an adjustable rectangular bridge...and, then it says rather than the more elaborate bottom-belly style in the LG-O. If you were told it once had an adjustable bridge, it likely is a B-15. If the person who told you so was not reliable, it might still be a LG-0 as the photos show a belly bottom bridge. Although, likely someone replacing B-15 bridge would put a belly bottom one on so it looked liked the LG-0s...I guess.

I can't tell from your photos if the guitar shown has actual binding where top joins the sides or if it is jus painted on binding. The Gibson book says the B-15 didn't have binding while the similar time period LG-0 did.

The Fabulous Gibsons books says the B-15 had a satin finish as opposed to the LG-0s, but that is not necessarily accurate as I've seen many LG-0s with non-gloss finishes. Plus, I've seen some LG-0s with mysteriously narrower headstocks than some other LG-0s.

Doesn't seem to be a 3/4 size guitar from what I can tell from the photos. Those usually have a smaller size look to them. Looks like a concert size guitar which the LGO, LG1, LG2,LG3, B-25s and B-15s all were.

The headstock coloring resembles a later 60s/early 70s headstock coloring, without the veneer on it from earlier eras.

I think the binding issue may be the tie breaker as to whether yours is late 60s/early 70s B-15 or a LG-0.

Hope this helps.

Question Mark aka "Jazzman" Jeff

#6 User is offline   BluesKing777 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 3384
  • Joined: 20-February 11

Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:18 PM

Is that a nylon string guitar?


I can't see any bridge pins?


BluesKing777.

#7 User is offline   ann 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 14-February 13

Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:19 PM

Wow - thanks for the informative reply - - I'll give it an even more careful read - meanwhile I just double checked and the binding shown in the picture - is black, and not painted on. Also the fellow who sold me the guitar seemed to be guessing about the bridge, as he thought it was a B25. I think it is original after more careful inspection.

Also I've seen pics of one or 2 guitars offered as B20's for sale.... this one looks like my guitar's twin - have a look.... http://www.guitar-mu...rig-Case-HagTag

Did the LGs have x bracing? The neck is rather narrow too as you can probably see in the photo's in case that's a clue.

#8 User is offline   zombywoof 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4928
  • Joined: 24-January 08

Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:40 PM

The SN and "Made in the USA" definitely place the guitar in the 1971-72 period.

I agree that it is not a 3/4 size B-25. If anything the specs show it to have a bit wider lower bout than the B-25.

If I had to guess I would think the B-20 was brought in to replace the B-15 as Gibson's "student" guitar. They may have discontinued it quickly because it was just competing with the B-25 which was still in production.
__________________________________________________


"I play so rough - I stomp 'em"
Bukka White

#9 User is offline   QuestionMark 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 531
  • Joined: 27-December 07

Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:47 PM

View Postann, on 16 February 2013 - 06:19 PM, said:

Wow - thanks for the informative reply - - I'll give it an even more careful read - meanwhile I just double checked and the binding shown in the picture - is black, and not painted on. Also the fellow who sold me the guitar seemed to be guessing about the bridge, as he thought it was a B25. I think it is original after more careful inspection.

Also I've seen pics of one or 2 guitars offered as B20's for sale.... this one looks like my guitar's twin - have a look.... http://www.guitar-mu...rig-Case-HagTag

Did the LGs have x bracing? The neck is rather narrow too as you can probably see in the photo's in case that's a clue.


The website showing the B-20 is suspect. Notice how the guitar in the case has a smaller lower bout than higher bout, but the straight on photos of the body show the lower and higher bout the same size. Plus, it refers to the guitar being rare. There are no early 70s guitars made by Norlin that can be considered rare in the collectible market. Guitar sales were simply down during that period and there were lower production runs. I checked the Vintage Guitar guide...and no such guitar a a B-20. (Surely if there was such a thing as a rare B-20, it would be listed in there.) I think the website is supect.

There is a full jumbo size J-40 from the Norlin era, that not too many are seen. It has a no pins in its bridge and resembles a natural J-45. The stock bridge on a J-40 looks like the one in your photos. ot The J-40 was an attempt at the time to make a more affordable instrument that appealed to J-45 owners. They're pretty good guitars, just cost cutting things on them from the J-45. They could be could be considered hard to find or rare, but not rare in a collectible, expensive way. Just not to many made. The model didn't last too long.

I have a question, is their a volute on the back of the neck where the neck joins the headstock. No volute would mean the neck just joins the headstock. If there's a volute, the volute is like a sculptured hump on the back of the neck where it joins the headstock. From 1970 on all Norlin era guitars have volutes. 1969 ones may or may not depending on if the existing stock had run out or not.

BTW, neither the LGO or B15 were X braced. B25s were. J-40s were.

Is yours X braced or ladder braced. (Look in the sound hole and then towards the bout where the bridge sits. If the bracing crosses, its X'd. If you see a straight brace, its ladder.

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

#10 User is offline   ann 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 14-February 13

Posted 16 February 2013 - 07:09 PM

hello again - and thanks so much for all the knowledgeable help - -

it does indeed have x bracing - as I try to show in one of the pictures... no especially large "hump" at the back of the neck where it meets the head stock - but upon close inspection of the wood grain - it looks like the neck was constructed with 3 long thin pieces of wood excellently matched - rather than the neck made of one piece. Hmmm.

Accounts of Gibson documents I've seen reference that 500 "B-20" guitars were made... but not much else about them. The B20 guitars that look identical to mine that I've seen online are stamped with a simple B20 on a vertical piece you can see when looking in the sound hole - which I assume helped seal where the 2 back pieces were joined. Mine however is perfectly blank there - with no evidence of any stamp or label ever having been there. So all I have to go on is the serial number, size and the look of the guitar.

I wonder if there are any records of the basic dimensions of B-20 guitars, as surely that would help! :-)

#11 User is offline   ann 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 14-February 13

Posted 16 February 2013 - 07:13 PM

View PostBluesKing777, on 16 February 2013 - 06:18 PM, said:

Is that a nylon string guitar?


I can't see any bridge pins?


BluesKing777.


#12 User is offline   ann 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 14-February 13

Posted 16 February 2013 - 07:14 PM

Nope - not a nylon string :-)

#13 User is offline   QuestionMark 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 531
  • Joined: 27-December 07

Posted 17 February 2013 - 01:47 AM

Found my Gruhn's Guide to Vintage Guitars book. Sure enough, it lists a B-20 in it, although it doesn't say much on it.

It just says: B-20. 14 1/2", mahagony back and sides, black binding, standard peghead size. It says it was available from only 1971-1972.

Note: The fact you mentioned it doesn't have a neck volute, could place it actually being available in 1969 despite what the book says, unless of course it used an unused neck from that period in 71-72..as I've never seen a +70 Gibson during the Norlin era without one, but of course anything is possible.

This one's a learning experience for me. I'd never heard of the model 'til this string and its research. With it having X bracing as you've mentioned and with the B25 still in production until 1977 (per the Gruhn book) and per the Gruhn book, the B-15 being available only from 1967-70 and per the Gruhn book...the LGO still being available until 1974...I gotta think the B-20 must have been a model that replaced the B-15, but yet was positioned below the B-25. Maybe between the B25 and the LGO as the B-20 had X bracing.

Potentially supporting this is the Gruhn book lists the LGO as having a 14 1/8" width and the B25 as having 14 1/4" width and the B-15 having a 14 1/2" width as does the B-20. The Gruhn book (unlike the Gibson Fabulous Guitars book) says the LGOs after switching to a spruce top in 1968 references that some LG0s after 1968 again had mahogany tops. So, if that was so (and your B-20 appears to have a spruce top)...would put the B-20 between the LG0 and B-25 in the hierarchy at the time.

All this is speculative with the limited info in the Gruhn book.

At least this confirms it is not a J40 or a LGO or a B15 or a B25...but its own unique model from the early Gibson Norlin era period. Hopefully, my assumption that it was between the LGO and B25 is correct.

As there are very little records from the Gibson Norlin era, I think its safe to make a logical guess that just as during that period Gibson made a cost cutting variation of the J-45 with a string-through rather than a pin bridge and called it a J-40...they probably took the same approach with the B25 and made cost cutting variation with the same string through bridge and then marketed it as a B-20. Especially since you mention the bridge on yours doesn't show any signs of it looking like it was a replacement bridge. We may never be able to confirm the J45/J40 and B25/B20 correlation, but it does seem to make sense. Maybe some of the cost cutting also was using the same body dimensions of the discontinued B-15's 14 1/2" body (or leftover stock) combined with a X braced spruce top like the B25's. ??? Could be. :)

Thanks for your patience as this stuff was researched to get to the heart of what is it and identify/validate is model. George Gruhn's book is quite credible in its ID'ing models even ones that are off the radar of the other books.

This has been a fun one to research and speculate on to fill in the gaps!

Sounds like you have a guitar model that you can tell others a story on and if they challenge you now, just tell them its listed in Gruhn's Guide to Vintage Guitars if they doubt a B-20 model existed!

Its gotta be a pretty good sounding small body guitar, especially if it has X bracing.

Hope this additional research and discussion/speculation was helpful.

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

#14 User is offline   ann 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 14-February 13

Posted 17 February 2013 - 11:40 AM

WOW! Thanks Jazzman Jeff! --- I was beginning to think I had lost my mind as references to the B-20 and pics of ones offered for sale in various states of health online were difficult to find and some even seemed to disappear when I tried to look for links to reference. Some pics I found were of guitars so neglected that it made me sad - I think this one spent untold ages under someone's bed forgotten - hence its relatively good condition... and I am thankful that it's rather strong musty smell is finally dissipating (sorry if that's TMI!) :-)

- I too found a very brief mention in the Gibson Blue Book - stating only that records show 500 B-20 guitars made in the B series - but nothing else about them. - the precious few images of B-20 guitars I was able to find online matched mine perfectly in size, shape, bracing, and even the odd string-through bridge. It is a small and delicate guitar but it sustains like a dream. It's narrow neck took some getting used to - but now I wouldn't trade it.

For anyone considering installing a pickup ... I had to have the frets re-done and a "Pure Western" guitar pickup installed which is just wonderful.

So - I guess we'll consider the pics I've submitted here pictures of a Gibson B-20 guitar unless someone else can come up with more information from a forgotten pile somewhere.

Thanks again for the sanity check! - I was starting to wonder if I somehow got a Japanese copy of a Gibson --- but hey - it's ultimately the SOUND that counts eh?

p.s. I am also learning a lot from all of the kind responses to this thread - so thank you so much - and I still am not sure what the "Norlin" period was, nor exactly what a "neck volute" is... is that the part of the neck where it joins the body at the back, or where the neck joins the headstock at the top? - If at the top, on the back - the headstock and the neck are shaped out of one piece of wood, (well actually 3 long pieces of wood laminated together lengthwise to form the entire neck and head).

Whew - sorry to have written a small novel out here - but hopefully the topic is of some interest if not at least slightly entertaining. We love talking about our guitars out here don't we??? :-)

PEACE and thanks again to all!
Keep those cards and letters a-coming :-)

#15 User is offline   zombywoof 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4928
  • Joined: 24-January 08

Posted 17 February 2013 - 01:23 PM

OK, a bit of history for ya.

The "Norlin-era" refers to the time period from 1969 to 1985. In 1969 an Ecuadorian holding company called E.C.L. became the majority stock holder in Gibson's parent company C.M.I. (which had purchased Gibson in 1944). In 1974 the name of E.C. L. was changed to Norlin (made up of part of the last names of the heads of both E.C.L and C.M.I.). The E.C.L/Norlin years are generally viewed as Gibson's dark days when quality was at its lowest.

A volute is simply a raised reinforcement of the area where the headstock meets the neck. I think Gibson started adding this in 1969. It generally looks like a triangle on the back of the neck below the headstock. Gibson had gone to a much thinner neck profile in 1960. The thinner necks made the guitars prone to breaking in that area. To try and solve the problem Gibson added a volute which essentially increassed the mass of wood at the point.
__________________________________________________


"I play so rough - I stomp 'em"
Bukka White

#16 User is offline   QuestionMark 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 531
  • Joined: 27-December 07

Posted 17 February 2013 - 07:41 PM

As background, I might add the Norlin era is one where the balance at Gibson tilted towards the cost cutting side without regard to the instrument quality and player focus side at the company upon which Gibson had built its reputation. Management decisions during the Norlin era began ignoring quality and player focus. For example, as a cost cutting move many bodies of guitars were interchanged regardless of a model's specific heritage/history. A typically round shouldered J-45 model began to be a square shoulded model so it could share the same body with say the square shouldered SJ model at the time...when players wanted their J-45s to be round shouldered. Headstocks break? No problem, put a volute on the neck so there will less headstock warrantee work. Problem is...overall players liked their Gibson necks to not have volutes on them...even though many many other fine intruments (including Gibson Masterton banjos and Martin guitars) have volutes on them and are accepted. Further making the decision on volutes a bad one for Gibson was they put the volute in the wrong spot to strengthen from breaking and being submitted for warrantee work. Necks broke just as much as ever only under the unpopular volute. (Not that the volute is actually that bad on a neck from the time. It ticked players off at the time to say Gibsons shouldn't have this on them.) Further complicating the era was many of the luthiers in the plant were upset at the cost cutting and its impact on their craftsmanship so they started putting an occasional intentional lack of or lackadasical craftsmanship effort into some instruments as nobody was watching quality control from a management perspective (as they were watching only the cost cutting.)

The situation grew worse as the 70s progressed. First it was some cost cutting changes, then it began to be quality control (meaning some instruments were made great within their parameters and some weren't)...then, as the 70s progressed it became a large quality control issue and when Norlin tried to reverse it, it was kinda too late as the historic/prospective Gibson buyer had already gone and bought a different brand.

When the Norlin Gibson company was at its very last gasp of destroying Gibson (and Epiphone, too)...the present new owners bought the failing company (circa early to mid 1980s) and began major steps to reestablish quality, quality control, heritage, and customer satisfaction with the financial balances needed for a company to thrive in the marketplace. They have been extremely successful, making Gibson (and Epiphone) leaders in the marketplace to their satisfaction and the satisfaction of many guitarists. A sign of that success is also that some guitarists, such as you...don't even know about the dark days of the Gibson brand because of their great reputation today and historically (other than during the Norlin period.) Although, I guess as a forum member now you do, too.

Hope this added flavor to what Zombywoof wrote in response to your questions.

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

#17 User is offline   ann 

  • Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 11
  • Joined: 14-February 13

Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:09 PM

Wow again - I'm so impressed with the generosity of all you folks out here - good to know stuff for sure! I feel very lucky that my B20 (we think) - was made in about 1970 hopefully before the worst of the cost cutting took effect... and even more fortunate that my only other Gibson is one I actually played at a gig tonight - my ebony Gibson Invader that I purchased in 1985 - Now I much more fully understand why the nice fellow at the guitar shop where I purchased it new as my first electric - told me that Gibson USA (as it was newly dubbed then) - had really gotten their act together again as far as quality went. --- The Invader is not fancy - I call it my poor man's Les Paul - no arched top - but it's been a very solid guitar which is now nearly 30 years old (OMG!) - and still looks spanking brand new in it's sturdy case.

I now hope to find a quality hard shell case for my little B20 as the chip board case it's in doesn't protect it as well as I'd like - - - I'm hoping to find one that will fit online from Musician's Friend ... I'll report back on how it fits for anyone who might benefit from that info. --- Thanks again for all the really cool historic info - most appreciated!

Cheers for now -
Ann

#18 User is offline   bobouz 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1836
  • Joined: 10-August 10

Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:30 AM

View Postann, on 17 February 2013 - 10:09 PM, said:

I now hope to find a quality hard shell case for my little B20 as the chip board case it's in doesn't protect it as well as I'd like - - - I'm hoping to find one that will fit online from Musician's Friend ... I'll report back on how it fits for anyone who might benefit from that info. --- Thanks again for all the really cool historic info - most appreciated!

Go online to get inner case dimensions from SKB, TKL, and Gator.

FWIW, I believe my old B25 fit well in a case made for a classical guitar.
Gibsons: '22 "A" Mandolin / '66 ES 125T / '90 Tennessean / '00 J-100 Xtra
'02 J-45 Rosewood / '02 SG Faded-moon / '06 ES 335 / '09 ES 339
'10 ES 330L / '11 ES 335-P90s / '12 LP Tribute / '12 ES 330 VOS
'12 LP Special / '12 J-185 / '13 LG2 American Eagle / '14 J-15
Epis: '66 FT45n Cortez / '00 AIUSA-JLH 1964 Sheraton / '04 Peerless Casino
'05 Paul McCartney 1964 Texan / '09 Elitist Casino / '10 Valensi Riviera
'11 50th Anniversary 1961 Casino / EL-00 Pro / {Trinity: TM-475 Mandola}
Martins: '01 Custom Rosewood Dread / '09 OM-1

#19 User is offline   asdf74 

  • Newbie
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 18-July 14

Posted 22 July 2014 - 02:19 PM

I have a Gibson B20 that I bought on eBay several years ago. I want to sell it. Does anybody know what it is worth. I know it was produced in the early 70's and only 500 were produced. It was in between the B15 and B25. Any help would be appreciated.

#20 User is offline   onewilyfool 

  • Advanced Member
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 6877
  • Joined: 28-December 07

Posted 23 July 2014 - 12:36 PM

Here is the B-20's big Rosewood cousin…the L-20…only 32 made in 1994 (100 year anniversary model)

Posted Image
"The sole of my shoes is thin, and I'll soon be on my feet again" Lonnie Johnson

Share this topic:


Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users