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Straight arm wearing out records Discussion about how to minimize the record wear and tear.

#1 User is offline   Devo 

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 04:53 AM

Hello,

tl;dr = skip the green text
I have just ordered my Stanton STR8.150 only to be informed that because the straight tonearm on the STR8 is shorter (reaches not as far into the record) than the ST.150, it puts a lot more pressure onto either sides of the grooves, causing them to wear out records significantly faster than curved tonearms.


My question is: What can I do (or buy) to minimize the erosion of records without sacrificing sound quality?
I won't be doing scratching at first, I just want to learn to DJ, and I don't want my records to die by the time I could actually mix them – of course I'm exaggerating.

I've read somewhere that spherical needles may be a solution to my problem..
What's your input? Please!
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#2 User is offline   Devo 

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 04:58 AM

I forgot to add: It's not just the effective length but the angle of the cartridge that's more aligned with the record grooves on the ST150 compared to the STR8.
BUT I COULD BE WRONG I mean I am inexperienced, I'm just throwing out there whatever makes sense to me right now. :(
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#3 User is offline   GPA-DJ 

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 01:45 PM

There have been several debates on this subject...

The odd truth is over-weighing your tonearm does just as much (or more) damage to your vinyl records than a properly setup straight tonearm.

S-Shaped tonearm offer a more balanced placement of the needle from beginning to end on a record. But can be more prone to skipping

Straight-Tonearms tend to lean a little more to one side / or the other of the groove for almost the entire record. But is less prone to skipping.
To offset this many cartridges are angled on the headshell.


The missing element most people don't take into consideration is the proper setting (balance) of the cartridge and tonearm
Along w/ the needle type you definitely don't want to backspin / scratch with an elliptical needle (stylus) so spherical needles with a high polish is best.


Cartridge Info Here!

Be sure to scroll down to the STANTON CARTRIDGES FACTS and TIPS & and see SETTINGS along with the other tabs.


Happy Mixing,
B~
>>> Please keep in mind the forum is a "social media" outlet
For Technical support contact Service@gibson.com or call 1-800-4Gibson for live customer support

Thanks,
GPA-DJ
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#4 User is offline   Devo 

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 12:21 PM

Hi,

Thanks for the response! I'm sorry I'm only responding now, but I gave up hope on the thread after a week of silence.
I'm glad I came back to see if anyone posted anything. Thanks again!

Cheers
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#5 User is offline   Confocal 

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 10:59 AM

View PostDevo, on 04 March 2013 - 04:58 AM, said:

I forgot to add: It's not just the effective length but the angle of the cartridge that's more aligned with the record grooves on the ST150 compared to the STR8.
BUT I COULD BE WRONG I mean I am inexperienced, I'm just throwing out there whatever makes sense to me right now. :(



The parameter to say how much the stylus is 'aligned' to the groove (it is better to say, how much the stylus is tangent to the groove) is expressed by the "Lateral tracking error". This 'error' is important because is the source of a distortion. The lateral tracking error is determined by three parameters that fully describe the configuration of the turntable : tonearm effective length, overhang, offset angle (please see on the web the description of these parameters).
On the ST150 user manual there is only the effective length of the tonearm, so it is difficult (let say impossible) to say something about the lateral tracking error. We can say only that the s shape tonearm typically are better in terms of tracking error respect a straight tonearm with the stylus in line with the shell (offset angle=0). But, I repeat, to say a correct information regarding the tracking error, it is important to know the three parameters I reported above or, of course, the error itself (typically declared by the manufacturer). So, a straight tonearm with a good combination of the three characteristics (effective length, overhang, offset angle) can be better than a S shape tonearm in terms of lateral tracking error!

To calculate the tracking error there is a formula (please see my post http://forum.gibson....t-tonearm-t120/). The tracking error it is not constant during the playback. It change depending the position of the stylus between the outer and inner grooves, i.e. the distance between the stylus and the center of the disk.
Typically we can say that the error is low when it is less than 1 or 2 degree.

I hope I was clear.

Regards.
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