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dhanners623's Profile User Rating: *****

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  1. Happy Labor Day

    04 September 2017 - 10:07 AM

    Since it is Labor Day and you're gonna be out barbecuing, here's a labor song I wrote, "Decatur." The video is a few years old, and I was playing a pretty nice '98 J-45 I used to have. I'm joined on harmonica by Bob Nordquist, a good friend and crackerjack songwriter in his own right.

    Happy grilling!

  2. New tune -- "Not in My Town"

    15 August 2017 - 11:57 PM

    Owning a slope Gibson, I have an obligation to write a protest song now and then. It's the law. Protest songs are part of a slope Gibson’s DNA that runs from Woody and Cisco to Dylan to Billy Bragg to Steve Earle to Tom Morello. I wanted to write about Charlottesville and the big question is, “Where to start?” I was reading a interview with a BLM member from Charlottesville and she was speaking about community defense. When asked about the planned march by bigots, she said, “Not here. Not in My Town.” Well, that’s your song right there. These are perilous times.

    “Not in My Town” isn’t the best song I've ever written -- it should probably have a snappy sing-along chorus -- but it doesn’t have to be the best. It is meant to capture anger and to have a line that is repeated over and over so the listener will get it. Not here. Not in my town.

  3. New tune -- "Not in My Town"

    15 August 2017 - 11:55 PM

    Owning a slope Gibson, I have an obligation to write a protest song now and then. It's the law. Protest songs are part of a slope Gibson’s DNA that runs from Woody and Cisco to Dylan to Billy Bragg to Steve Earle to Tom Morello. I wanted to write about Charlottesville and the big question is, “Where to start?” I was reading a interview with a BLM member from Charlottesville and she was speaking about community defense. When asked about the planned march by bigots, she said, “Not here. Not in My Town.” Well, that’s your song right there. These are perilous times.

    “Not in My Town” isn’t the best song I've ever written -- it should probably have a snappy sing-along chorus -- but it doesn’t have to be the best. It is meant to capture anger and to have a line that is repeated over and over so the listener will get it. Not here. Not in my town.

    http://youtu.be/0rwhDwa0-aw
  4. "Irwinton" -- a new tune on the '35....

    14 August 2017 - 01:48 AM

    Here's a new tune. A couple of things inspired it. One was a Facebook group whose members were dedicated to writing a new song each week during the summer. Each week they'd be given a prompt to write a song about. I only stumbled across the group when it had two weeks left to go, and the prompt was "soil."

    Then a week or two ago, Buc shipped over some lyrics to a song he'd written about Sherman's March to the Sea. Buc did a fine job, but it got me to thinking -- Sherman's Savannah Campaign is something I've always wanted to write about. So, inspired by that and the "soil" prompt, I sat down to do some research and write.

    The song is from the perspective of a poor Georgia cotton farmer who is in the Georgia Militia and not real keen about what he sees. He also realizes that the wealthy planters whose lifestyle he is fighting to uphold really haven't done anything for him.



    Here are the lyrics:


    Irwinton
    © 2017 by David Hanners

    Sherman left Atlanta with the 1st Alabama Cavalry
    Up Decatur Road marching to the sea
    Burned railroads, mills and houses, anything they couldn’t eat
    Can’t say we’d do different were we not in defeat

    My farm outside of Irwinton is all that I had
    It’s where my thoughts retreated when shot rained overhead
    Laid waste to our homes, set cotton gins aflame
    Charred souvenirs of Sherman’s Savannah Campaign

    General Smith said we’d give the Federals their due
    We were no match for their Spencers and their Henrys, too
    Griswoldville was nothing but a harvest of death
    At night young and old alike desert without a breath

    Atlanta lay in ruins, Savannah fell without a shot
    Nobody’s told me yet what this war’s about
    Dandies bring the Africans to work their land for free
    Those same wealthy men never did a thing for me

    This soil was my life, it's where you’ll bury me
    I would defend it from any enemy
    Parlor soldiers get the glory, we just get the gore
    Smith can have his damn militia; he’ll not see me anymore
  5. So I joined the Bob Colosi cult....

    07 July 2017 - 03:44 PM

    Just got my J-35 back from the shop after having them install a Bob Colosi "aged bone" saddle and all I can say is, "Wow!" It was a darn-nice guitar to begin with, but it is definitely louder and more defined now. There is a VERY noticeable improvement.

    Yes, I know Colosi packs the saddle blanks with detailed and allegedly fool-proof instructions, but I decided to have the folks at St. Paul Guitar Repair (they all used to work in Charlie Hoffman's shop in Minneapolis) do the work because I figured I'm only in the States for a few weeks and if there's a way to screw it up, I'll find it. The repairman who did the work, Kevin Schwab, said aside from Colosi's saddle being better material than Tusq, the stock saddle was too thin for the slot and was actually leaning forward. It's bottom wasn't flat on the bottom of the saddle slot. (He said they've seen some Gibsons out of Montana with super-high saddles installed in an attempt to mitigate necks installed at the wrong angle. The force of the strings pushed the saddles forward, actually splitting the bridge.)

    Anyway, I've been playing the thing for awhile and there IS a difference, for the better. I know we have debates here now and again about replacing stock parts and I am of the belief you can buy a good guitar but still make it better. Granted, some upgrades deliver more bang for the buck than others, but this was money well spent. Between the improvement in material and the discovery that the stock saddle was too thin for its slot, I am glad I upgraded to a Colosi saddle.

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Comments

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  1. Photo

    Mik Neville 

    25 Dec 2016 - 20:36
    E-mail bogey2bogey@yahoo.ca Thanks again might help me to make my mind up one way or the other
  2. Photo

    dhanners623 

    20 Dec 2016 - 14:08
    Mik-- It is a heck of a job. I didn't do it myself, but had a buddy who was in luthiery school at the time do it. Send me your email address at dhanners55@gmail.com and I'll forward the email he sent me in which he described everything he did and how he did it. It's quite extensive. His work improved the sound.
  3. Photo

    Mik Neville 

    20 Dec 2016 - 13:38
    Looking at some old posts I read where you had the finish on your Texan sanded down. I'm thinking of doing this to a masterbilt did you do it yourself and how big a job was it or did you have it done for you. I can not see how thinning out the finish could not help the sound to improve. Anyhow thanks for any info in advance I enjoy reading your posts thanks Mick
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