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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/17/2019 in all areas

  1. I have just acquired this stunning if bruised guitar just wanted to see if anyone out there has a similar treasure and if they have any comments/ suggestions - amplification, strings etc
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  2. This might be it...I don't know if it's the result of a long depressive bout or what, but here of late the very thought of picking up a guitar just makes me sad... the very thing I relied on to help me through just makes me feel worse now. My attempts at playing in church worship have resulted in me making the other musicians/singers stumble. The type of songs they do honestly sound better w/just a piano anyway... I'm this close to taking my stable to a local shop to put up on consignment. It would help him out in the process. You all are a terrific bunch. I've really enjoyed lurking and occasionally joining in. There are two individuals I'd like to thank especially. Jinder, our shared Dove love has made me feel a real kinship w/you... And my Scarecrow (you know, the one Dorothy said she's miss the most), if it wasn't for this place I never would have gotten to shake hands w/Mr. Woof, and for that I will be eternally grateful... If you all want to banter back and forth about my decision go ahead. I don't suppose I'll be looking in though... All the best to you all God bless Cab
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  3. These early post-war guitars are from a great period. The wartime shortages of wood and metal were over. The spruce that went into gliders during the war was available for soundboards, and straight-grain quarter-sawn Honduras mahogany that was used for such things as planking PT boats during the war was once again becoming the sides and backs of Gibsons (and Martins). The folk music boom of the late 50's and beyond had yet to develop, so the demand for guitars was still at rational levels, unlike the 60's and 70's where the goal was purely maximum output. The OP's guitar is a beautiful example from a wonderful time in Gibson's history. I hope he enjoys it for many years. I would call that one a keeper.
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  4. Congrats on being the new steward of such a beautiful instrument. I hope it gives you years of enjoyment! Red 333
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  5. Any day with a Jimmy Reed song puts a smile on my face. One R&B classic deserves another... Kansas City - Wilbert Harrison (Written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller )
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  6. Any thoughts on that? I am curious, as they sound pretty darn good right now. I'd go with the "If it aint broke, don't fix it" method of analysis...
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  7. Right below, in your case, where it reads "All Access"...yours is +346 just now...
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  8. Wow! He's Damn good! Very reminiscent of Joe's Virtuoso albums...I hear a lot of Joe's licks in there. Into the favorites goes Pasquale! Thanks, jdgm! As far as Tuck goes, he and Patti are still touring and producing recordings for other folks. Here's a link to their website...https://www.tuckandpatti.com/ I think that, like other genres of music, jazz has become "codified" and academicized...unfortunate. I run across this in my travels...I'll play something and some joker will say, "That's not the Blues or, That's not Jazz!" as if they are experts in musicology. Jazz and Blues have grown past what they were in the 1940s and '50s but try to tell that to the guy at the local jam! If you want to know what these styles have become, check out Corey Henry, Robert Glasper, Anderson Paak, and cats like that. My reason for saying this is that I hope in 20 years, Pasquale might get past what was and grow into what is. Also, to be clear, I am in no way attempting to diminish his (or anyone's) obvious mastery of music; I just wish that musicians would become less curators and more innovators. Apologies for going off on a tear there, it's just something that I think about a great deal. Thanks for posting a great new listening experience, jdgm. Peace!
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  9. I think it may depend on what finish the guitar is. Looking at the Gibson website there on 10 finishes available for the Custom Shop 60th anniversary guitar and if you click on the different finishes, the lettering seems to be whiter on some of them, and the gold on others. Do you recall the two you saw in the shop that were different, did they have different body finishes?
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  10. I had a 2015 Classic for a year or so, it sounded fantastic, and no manufacturing issues at all, I only sold it because I found the neck a little bit too wide. I even loved the G-Force. It meant I could play Kashmir, and The Rain Song, without having to carry extra guitars in specific tunings. So next I got a 2014 Classic. Another great guitar but, it could have had the binding applied a bit better. I even fitted a G-Force to it. Anyway, I decided to part with that, and went back to playing Superstrats and my old Tokai LS-80 for a short time. I was missing the Gibson, so a few months ago I bought a 2017 Standard T. Wow, what a machine. I can't find a single fault with it. Everything is perfect. It's by far the best sounding guitar I've ever owned, and I've been playing live for 40 years. The compound radius fretboard took a while to get used to but, anyone who's used to playing Jackson's, Charvels, Music Man etc should feel right at home. The switching options are great, and so are the Grover locking tuners, although I might put the G-Force on at some point.
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  11. Oh, come now, Farns. Are you trying to tell us that Les Pauls of the same model can vary in feel, tone and weight from one to the next? I hardly think Gibson would allow that to happen. Before you know it you'll be saying that in a blind test & just by listening to them it's impossible to tell a solid-bodied from a weight-relieved LP... Pip.
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  12. Maybe your title should read... '2017 Gibson Les Paul Guitar of the Year?' Maybe Gibson is getting their cheapest models made in China? That would explain the immaculate finish ;)
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