Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/21/2021 in Posts

  1. We got a new kitty. Female, no name yet. We have three other cats and two dogs. So me and my wife are at the Farmer's Market this morning just before dawn setting up her EZ-Up. She sells figs and baked goods. She's all jammed in between this guy and that lady and we're all shifting our tents around to get set up and the guy is hogging his space really bad. So I ask him to shuffle over a little and the guy's all "Well, I didn't notice!!!!" I told the guy the lines are painted right there on the pavement. He's goes "I'm not intimidated by your behavior. I'm trying to make the most of my morning and you have exssssternal problems that you need to deal with that are getting in the way of you being a good person!"
    3 points
  2. This is interesting. My dad brought home a new ‘64 LG-1 because my then-8 yo brother wanted to take lessons. I was 7, but I remember my dad’s excitement about getting a student guitar for him. My dad knew zero about guitars when he walked into the music store next to his office. (Kramers, on Milwaukee Avenue in…Niles, IL. The details a kid remembers!) Somebody there most definitely touted it as a “student” guitar. I’ve told this story before, I think, but the February day he brought it home was the day we all learned about crazing. Apparently, he bought the thing on his lunch hour and stored it in the trunk of our car. So when came home at dinner time to impress us all, we gathered around as he opened the case. We oohed and aahed… and within minutes, we heard a quiet snapping and watched little spider-y lines run across the shiney, orange top. My dad’s face went white, and he was sure the guitar was shattered. A few days later, he told us he’d checked with the store and…learned that the damage was cosmetic only. He relayed in great detail the physics behind what we saw and heard that first evening, and then, wiser and a bit subdued, he turned to his four kids and wife and pronounced “The moral of the story is, ‘Never leave a guitar in your trunk in winter.’” Me, I fell in love with it at first sight, and during the 50+ years I played it, I sometimes referred to it as a teacher guitar, because I was the only student in that relationship.
    3 points
  3. easy pick retrieval as well...
    3 points
  4. Almost a year later the 59 style Wilshire is probably my most incredible playing guitar, only needing a few neck tweaks to adjust to its new mountain environment. This long necked monsters thin Medium C neck is very fast and stable enough I could instal a Duesenberg on it. For me the P90 Pros sound so good on the solid mahogany body. The only things I have done is to smooth the edge of the translucent Tortoise Shell style pickguard, added some stiff foam under the bridge pickup to help stabilize it. The CTS pots are great and the Epiphone Deluxe Tuners are still very smooth. It is my lightest and most comfortable player followed by my Blueshawk and SG Classic.
    3 points
  5. Personally I prefer a neck be a little overset. It allows me to obtain the low action I like and keeps the strings above the soundboard and keeps the saddle at a decent height. The NL I have is slightly overset and I like it. As far as beginner guitars being the teacher, here’s the Kay my mom got me back in ‘64.
    2 points
  6. Here is the definition of exclusive - an item produced by only one source. So keep eating what their feeding ya. Here is Gibson's marketing blurb - INTRODUCING THE GENERATION COLLECTION ACOUSTICS, FEATURING THE EXCLUSIVE GIBSON PLAYER PORT™, PROVIDING A TRULY UNIQUE AND IMMERSIVE SONIC EXPERIENCE. NOW YOU CAN FINALLY “HEAR MORE OF YOU” Look Taylor does it too, and did it before Gibson did if I am not mistaken. https://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/acoustic/browse McKnight does it too. Who ever they are? I guess they will be sued by Gibson pretty soon and they didn't get the memo of who the "C-ock of of the walk" is and that they got all the lawyers and are not afraid to litigate with them. https://mcknightguitars.com/more-info/options/sound-ports/ As mentioned in the OP, Breedlove does it as well, so exclusive my a-ss. https://breedlovemusic.com/acoustic-guitars/2018-solo-concert-acoustic-guitar I can't find any Martin's with it and I have never seen one on their website. Dogs playing poker and David Croz on the tops of guitars yes, but a Martin with 2 holes nope. Except Willie's Trigger which was done with years of play and wear. Later B-itches
    2 points
  7. I have loved and played Martin Guitars for years until I played my first Gibson Hummingbird Original. This Guitar suits me better than almost every guitar I ever played.
    2 points
  8. https://www.gibson.com/generation? Some very different takes from Gibson with their USA made, more accessible $$$ guitars. Just got an email announcement, and this is the page I landed on when clicking. Just a quick marketing related note of my first impression. For the first time for me, I was given the impression that it was not just a cheapo version of the real thing kind of vibe. Maybe copying some others in the marketplace, yes. But this looks like a nice separation for them. I hope it all works out for them.
    1 point
  9. I ordered a Hummingbird Inspired by Gibson at Guitar Center almost 2 months ago, and after a month of telling me they are out of stock I cancelled that order and went to Sweetwater. Sweetwater had the case in stock, but the guitar was again backordered. And over the last month Epiphone has not responded to inquiries by my sales consultant. Not we're sorry, we don't have any ships to go to China, we didn't realize there are cargo planes that go to China, just crickets... nothing. If you just don't care about your better half product just say so and the world will move on. But No Response is not acceptable for any business! What a shame your fear has ruined your company, in fact the Gibson model is out of stock also. Guess no one in Kalamazoo cares about selling guitars. I'll start shopping boutique builders now.
    1 point
  10. So I have been looking for a maple bodied dreadnought with a short scale fingerboard, and they are rare as hen's teeth. But my buddies at Sweetwater must have known what I was jonesing for as they commissioned a Sweetwater exclusive Hummingbird with a maple body, and the usual 'Bird 24.75 inch scale. For some reason they decided to have it painted (stained?) in what they call Viper Blue and I would much rather see a quilted maple in a natural finish so you could see the wood but was more concerned about how it would sound than what color it was. I think Gibson has a tendency to paint colors over wood that doesn't have great grain patterns - but apparently this is what Sweetwater wanted so it's what they got. I have no idea how many of them were made. But it arrived today and I love it. Very crisp maple tone (without being too bright or trebly), even balance between strings. Has a Gibson rounded C neck, 12 inch radius, rosewood board and the short scale. All of which are feature I like most, so it fits in my hand very comfortably and feels familiar. And the color looks a lot better in person than in photos - the neck looks painted black in photos, but it's really the dark blue as well. Unlike my "original" Hummingbird it has Grover rotomatic tuners and a plain truss rod cover, same Baggs VTC pickup.
    1 point
  11. Hello, Curious as to what string gauge/type everybody is using on their older ladder braced Gibson boxes. I changed my strings on my 1948 Gibson Lg-1 today and put on 80/20 D’addario 12s. Guitar seems to be okay with them at the moment, but i dont know if this will be a disaster in the long run. My 000 sovereign will just barely tolerate 11s, but im thing with the gibson short scale i may be okay. Then again it is a 48 and im unsure if they were built too light at that time for 80/20 12s. .What does everyone think and use on there own ladder braced guitars ?
    1 point
  12. Yeah. Naming pets can be difficult. But some are clever at it. For instance... My brother in law had a huge mutt he named "Scruffy". And going by the dog's appearance, no other name was suitable. And..... My wife used to get her hair cut at a particular place. One day while there with her I noticed a blue parakeet in a cage in the place. So, to make conversation, I asked the girl who ran the place the parakeet's name. She replied, "Flip." With a puzzled tone I asked, "Flip?" and she came back with, "Yeah, you know.... Flip. The bird." My daughter once had a pet rabbit she named "Stu". One of my nieces once had a little toy something or other dog she named "Squeaky". When I asked why that name, she simply said, "Step on 'im." My brother however, had one dog long ago he named "Poochie". And years later a cat he named "Cat". He never had any children, which is good because I couldn't imagine what THEIR names would have been. Whitefang
    1 point
  13. Yes. Many times with my bands we've rehearsed a lot before a gig, then we play and either make a bunch of screw ups or we're just flat. Then we play some gig where we haven't practiced in weeks and we play great. I'm not sure what causes this phenomenon but it is a real thing.
    1 point
  14. Thanks "M". That was going to be my next question. (The size of the wrench). I have a pretty good tool kit. The lower E has a buzz since it was serviced so i think there has been some movement. I'll take some tentative steps to adjust it per yours and the above suggesting. Much appreciate you taking the time to reply!
    1 point
  15. Thanks Randy. I never thought to question the GC Tech. It could be that they tried to adjust it with the wrong sized key and experienced "a defective truss rod recess". Nontheless, your advice and video makes me think I can probably adjust this myself. Also thanks for the context of neck movement. It sounds like movement is inherent and adjustment therefore is a necessary skill for a guitarist to acquire. Much appreciate you taking the time to reply!
    1 point
  16. A lot of people assume that when you have an L shaped hex wrench that you put the short end into the socket and use the long end for torquing it down. On Epiphones the short end is frequently not long enough to seat properly using the 4mm hex wrench that comes with your guitar. So basically use the long end and make sure it seats properly. If needed you can use a small adjustable wrench for additional torque on the short end. You can also use a longer our straight 4mm hex driver. It is usually safe to do a 1/8 turn and retune then check to see if its enough, if needed do it again and repeat until it flattens to the direction you want and let it sit for a while and retune. Also as it flattens you may need to eventually adjust the bridge.
    1 point
  17. When the student is ready - the teacher will appear ! Yep. That was my relationship with mine. Sort of the guitar version of "My First Love", I've never 'bonded' with another guitar in the same way. Thanks for the memory!
    1 point
  18. Sounds like he's takin the view that the best defense is a good offense. That's how these folks roll - step on your toes and blame you for putting your foot under theirs. You have to step back, take a breath and realize their ego is writing checks their brains can't cash. Then, you can turn away and forget him. Great practice - because there's lots of axe holds like that out there. If cats and dogs can get along - we can get along with people like that. By making our point, but not being trapped into an escalating argument. Because that's what they want - feeds their ego's need for 'conflict and drama'. 😁
    1 point
  19. You reminded me of the a verse in David Allen Coe song, "You Never Even Call Me by My Name". (spoken:) Well, a friend of mine named Steve Goodman wrote that song, and he told me it was the perfect country and western song. I wrote him back a letter and I told him it was not the perfect country and western song because he hadn't said anything at all about momma, or trains, or trucks, or prison or gettin' drunk. Well, he sat down and wrote another verse to this song and he sent it to me and after reading it I realized that my friend had written the perfect country and western song. And I felt obliged to include it on this album. The last verse goes like this here: Well, I was drunk the day my momma got out of prison, And I went to pick her up in the rain. But before I could get to the station in the pick-up truck, She got runned over by a damned old train.
    1 point
  20. While I intentionally pushed the envelope with my funny correlation comment between the now popular trend of Levi jeans with multiple holes and now Gibson models, I think what really is causing the current ok/not ok debate about the New Generation models is the same old same old with Gibsons that Henry openly said he could not overcome during his final days as CEO and that JC said he would try to find a balance for, if he could, during his new reign. And, that being the marketing obstacle to Gibsons that many Gibson owners and buyers have certain expectations of only traditional Gibsons from the company. That Henry tried to overcome and basically only could with the Songwriter model, despite other non-J45, J-200, Hummingbird, etc models being introduced to expand the lineup. I think that’s why JC started renaming so many newer models with a J45 association rather than say a J-15 moniker even though it clearly was just a renaming game that apparently is working. But, now, Gibson is opening labelling a new line as a New Generation line meaning it differs from the traditional line and…well look what’s back! Traditionalists balking at Gibson expanding the line up. So it’s not really haters vs non-haters, it’s just Gibson trying to openly be a traditionalist company and a non-traditionalist company to see how that works. And, look how the divide is already causing a reaction. Yet, Gibson does need to figure out a way to be both a traditionalist company and a company that gets those who are not interested in traditions to purchase Gibsons rather than Taylor’s, Breedloves, or even Martins (who is actually managing lately to come out with successful new environmentally friendly guitars and models that deviate from their traditional line of guitars to new and existing buyers.) And. if Gibson is actually using Levi’s strategy, which I meant tongue in cheek regarding multiple holes, well Levi’s must be given credit for being a long term company who has taken a very old tradition product that somehow keeps getting new generations of young people to keep buying and wearing their product. So, I give JC credit for his new line and effort. It’s not like he’s discontinuing the traditional line that he has really beefed up since his reign started. Let’s hope this new generation adds to Gibson’s traditional sales so the company thrives and keeps Gibson guitars in all players hands for a long time. This is one of those things that needn’t be either/or. They should have both traditional guitars and non-traditional ones that sell well to help keep them in business and competitive with companies like Martin who are doing that. Just my thoughts. QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff
    1 point
  21. It's tough for 'Mom 'n Pop' stores to compete with the 'big-box' stores.....although, GC seems to be in financial trouble. The 'Mom 'n Pop' stores need to learn they need to sell more than merchandise....they need to sell service! We have a local music shop here in town.... I don't pretend to be a guitar master when I go there...and the staff is always super pleasant....will go WAY out of their way to assist me..... I needed a shoulder rest for my fiddle..... I had NO idea what I was looking for.... the guys found me exactly what I needed. That's something you can't get at GC.
    1 point
  22. Tough room… In the mid 2000s I’d seen $6,000 guitars with the port. Everyone raved. Folks on AGF posted tutorials how to add one to their own guitar. here, Gibson, trying to appeal to a lower price point, and knowing that they already make 16 billion other J45s old school, albeit some with funky colors… here they make an entry level made in America G45 20% cheaper than a Martin D15, and it’s like Obama ordered mask wearing in a QANON bar and grill in Florida. if I had the scratch I’d buy one just to see Martin Pepper convulse and twitch …. 🙂 I think it’s a nice Gibson move, and I bet with the natural satin finish they sound great.
    1 point
  23. A huge Musicians’ Gear warehouse used to be a 15 minute drive from me. They helped supply all the GCs. They had a retail store at one end of it that was awesome. If they believed you were a serious shopper, they’d let you play any guitar they had. Great used/new merchandise and the employees were fantastic. Sweet bargains. Top notch music people. Some of them would work weekends at GC. Two of the gals were covered with tattoos. One had a Mohawk haircut and what-a-looker. It was fun to shop there, especially when they knew you. No mater how much you already knew, they could help you. Those were good times that won’t be back.
    1 point
  24. I have to admit, and it may be pushing it, but is it possible there is a correlation between the latest popular trend of new Levi’s now having multiple holes in them and a new guitar run by a former Levi’s executive now having multiple sound holes in them? No offense to anyone, just pushing the envelope here. QM aka: ”Jazzman” Jeff
    1 point
  25. Retired, I haven't seen you in here for a while, but yes I got the 59 style Wilshire which has become my main goto guitar.. But then recently the SG Classic creeped into my awareness, so I had to get one.. and.... I am happy to report I am loving the Mean 90 conversion on my Epi ES-339. All is well, so well that I have trouble deciding what to play.. 🙂
    1 point
  26. I resonate with this....know the feeling. 🔔
    1 point
  27. Whitefang, With non-rectilinear wide lenses, unless the plane of the lens is parallel to the horizon, distortion of this type results. RBSinTo
    1 point
  28. See if there is an unsubscribe button on the e-mail.
    1 point
  29. Yes, it is nice to have a week off rehearsing, especially this week, no rehearse and out on Friday night. It'll be like first night outta prison if you know what I mean. rct
    1 point
  30. Guy Clark was a great person and communicator. We had a great conversation backstage at one of his gigs in Chicago and when I let him know I would be in his hometown of Austin in a few months doing some gigs and some music business, he said no worries, he would find me when I was there and we’d continue our great conversation. Sure enough, a few months later when I was sitting in the lobby at the Driskell Hotel in Austin, Guy comes walking over to me and says Jeff, let’s continue that great conversation we were having. Guy was quite a human being and your friend was blessed to have been friends with him. QM aka “ Jazzman” Jeff
    1 point
  31. It's a scarf joint. A couple of discrepancies to what the wiki describes. The neck is 5-ply bound, and the pickguard does not have the "E". As per my other post, serial # puts it 10 yr old from China. Thanks
    1 point
  32. Behind The Rain -Gato Barbieri Notes ♫
    1 point
  33. "any port in a storm" so Im gonna try one.....
    1 point
  34. I spent 3 hours at Fuller's last Friday. They have a large selection of great sounding Gibson acoustics on the walls, but I went specifically to play the J185's. I'm gassing for for one, but have been unable to find one that did it for me. That said, I don't have cash in hand to purchase one and would have to sell misc gear/stuff to make the purchase. There were two nice J185's, but neither really made me want to buy them. My Gibson stable is currently a SJ200, J45 Vintage and an Epiphone Inspired by Gibson Hummingbird. I've always wanted a Hummingbird and tried many, but never found one that screamed buy me. The closest I've come was one of the Sheryl Crow Country Western Supreme models I played at Fuller's last year. It was excellent, but the pick guard and red back/sides didn't do it for me. My Epiphone IBG is a great guitar which currently tickles my fancy for one (A-B'd against the Gibsons that were available in GC when I purchased it and it won out). That said, I spent a lot of time playing a 2021 Gibson Hummingbird 1960's at Fuller's this trip. Amazing guitar! $4,900 out the door price tag, and I tried to justify spending the money on it. Worked through all the things I could sell to get close. Tried to talk myself into just buying it knowing I'd regret it if I didn't. In the end I walked out empty handed and have gone back and forth about making it happen. Ultimately, $5k is just too much for me to drop at this point in my life. My IBG Bird isn't close to the Bird I played, but it scratches the itch for a fraction of the price and is a fun guitar to play. I really liked the 1950's J45 burst too as the thicker necks do it for me. The surprise of the trip were the two Epiphone Frontiers they had. Fantastic guitars! I fully expected to not like them, but they were beautiful and both played/sounded amazing and were much lighter than anticipated. Not a fan of the look and don't want to own one, but man they were fun. In a nutshell, Gibson is making some great guitars right now, and Fullers has a whole gaggle of them.
    1 point
  35. I had a J45 Studio Walnut. A fantastic guitar. These G45s sound better unplugged. Satin finish. You just have to baby them, or be ok with gig mojo.
    1 point
  36. Doctors say that 4 out of 5 people suffer from diarrhea. Does that mean one enjoys it?
    1 point
  37. Good luck Joe… I want that G45!
    1 point
  38. I've been waiting for one of these ever since I saw them on a video from Japan earlier in the year, maybe last year... I've been wanting a backup guitar for gigging and and have always wanted a Gibson. So I jumped on the Sweetwater email I received this morning. Ordered a G-00. The soundport is nice but not the reason for my order. I just wanted a comfortable player that sounds good and I can gig with. I'll hopefully have it on Thursday, gig on Friday. Fingers crossed.
    1 point
  39. I would go with the Gibson SG Standard 61.
    1 point
  40. Good to see Gibson offering some acoustics at a lower price point which will allow more people to try them. Sound port guitars are complicated though and I'm pretty sure what you as a player will hear coming from these guitars is not what your audience will hear. First, a sound port is really only effective when the instrument is played unplugged. Plugged in everyone will hear what the pickup produces and the sound from an under saddle pickup is never the same as the actual acoustic sound of the guitar. With a regular guitar with just a center sound hole, all the air comes out from that sound hole. With a sound port added a portion of the air comes out the port, and the amount coming out of the center sound hole is reduced. With the design Gibson is using the player will get to hear what comes out of both holes because the sound port is pointed up at the player's left ear. But the audience isn't going to hear the same thing because what comes out the sound port is not being projected toward them, and what comes out the center hole has been reduced by the amount coming out the port. Taylor came out with a sound port guitar about two years ago and I bought one. Their design has the sound port in a cut away and the guitar sounds amazingly good if you are sitting out in front of it. But the player never gets to hear that sound because the port points sort of down and away from you. Because I couldn't hear what the combination of center sound hole and port were doing I tended to over play it. So it's a trade off - with Gibson's design the player gets to hear it, but the audience doesn't. You'll think your guitar sounds great, but the audience won't hear the same thing. With the Taylor design it sounds wonderful to the audience but the player doesn't hear the same thing. So I'd say you have to try these in person and make sure you have someone else play it while you sit out front and listen. Then you have to decide if you are buying and playing the guitar just for your own enjoyment of the sound or if you want an audience to have the best experience.
    1 point
  41. Probably great guitars. You can cut prices considerably by choosing different materials and adornments and still make a great playing, sounding guitar. I wonder about them spreading the Bozeman resources even further though.
    1 point
  42. A few years ago I played a '72 SJ at Elderly. I didn't expect to like it but I did - I think the above sums it up nicely for that guitar.
    1 point
  43. Been awhile since I have last posted on here. But last time I posted, I posted about that green '03 M.I.M Fender Telecaster I got and wanting to do upgrades to it. Well, I did. A couple of months ago, I dropped a set of Lace Sensor Tele pickups, a prewired Emerson Telecaster kit,, and Fender locking tuners. Haven't put strap locks on it, yet, as I should finally get that done. Anyway, I really like these Lace Tele pickups. Have that Tele tone, but more beefy, hotter, and maybe a touch warmer to my ears. Great pickups! https://i.imgur.com/iYjf1LX.jpg https://i.imgur.com/AwadcWO.jpg
    1 point
  44. The replacement nut for Kramer Baretta Special is: Graph Tech PT-6060-00 Black TUSQ XL Slotted Epiphone-style Guitar Nut - 1/4" 34.7mm Spacing
    1 point
  45. Sweet as hell, Bob! Great tune and real life story. I love the gentle music and the way the different stories are all weaved together as they lead to-and-from 1965. I’m glad you shared this. This is how so many of us identify with each other and relate to the past. Real music about real people.
    1 point
  46. My son in law is in his late 30's. He's had my 1974 J-50 Deluxe on permanent loan for the past 5 or 6 years now. Whenever they would come visit, it was the first guitar he would pick up - he liked it better than my 1965 and 2008 J-50's. I told him about the complaints people have raised about the Norlin guitars and he thought that was very funny. 😁 A few years earlier, I had some major repairs done to that guitar which had gradually become un-playable. The luthier was able to avoid a neck reset by planing the fretboard and doing a re-fret, he also fixed some cracks. When it was ready to pick up, I asked the luthier if he had any problems fixing it. He said the only "problem" was that he enjoyed playing it so much, he didn't want to give it back. He just shook his head when I mentioned the complaints about 70's Gibsons. He did a great job on it, I think it sounded much better than it did when I bought it in 1974. Personally, I still like it but it's not all that special for me, which is why I was willing to part with it. But some people do just like that sound. For one thing, it is really LOUD - much louder than my other Gibsons. But "loud" doesn't necessarily mean "good"... I'd say it doesn't have some of the subtlety of my other Gibsons. So, I'd suggest that you just play any guitars you can find and make your own decisions instead of relying on what other people tell you.
    1 point
  47. Dang... made my pecker twitch.
    1 point
  48. LOVE my black Sj200 Standard, but I have a couple of Guild F-50Rs from 2005 that are two of the best acoustic guitars I have ever seen, heard and /or played! Guild guitars are just flat-out amazing!
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...