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bonzoboy

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bonzoboy last won the day on January 18 2013

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About bonzoboy

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 03/15/1954

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    East Coast of Newfoundland,Canada
  • Interests
    All aspects of guitar including repair and restoration.Rock Trivia,Rock Biographies,Reading non-fiction,Gardening, Collecting Diecast car/truck models: 1/43,1/32,1/24,1/18. Watching and collecting historical DVDs and books.Collecting classic rock vinyl and CDs as well as hundreds of classical CDs and albums.
  1. I have a Korean made (Samick factory,2001) EJ-200 acoustic non-cutaway that I bought a couple of years ago.The solid Sitka Spruce top is beautifully bookmatched and what is really different is that the back is made of a single piece of maple that has been split down the center and had a checkered middle strip separating the 2 halves.I have played some of the more recent EJ-200-CEs cutaway acoustic-electrics and I have to say that there is no comparison when the Korean model is put up against the Indonesian or MIC models,the Korean models are as close as you can get to the $5,000+ Gibson.Even though the Indonesian and MIC models are quite good guitars,I'd take my 2001 MIK non-cutaway acoustic EJ-200 over any MIC or MII EJ-200-CE acoustic-electric any day.
  2. I bought a used 2001 Korean made EJ-200 (Samick factory) a couple of years ago.She's a non-cutaway non electric with a natural finish and she sounds HUGE and certainly gives her Gibson counterpart a run for the money.I have been considering putting electronics into her but she sounds so incredible played acoustically that I just can't get around to electrifying her.My EJ-200 was in near mint condition when I bought her for $400 Cdn. and I have kept her in the same condition ever since,if you can find a good used EJ-200 either with or without electronics,you can't go wrong-especially if it's an early 2000's non-cutaway Korean made Samick factory model.
  3. Congrats on buying one of the best guitars around today.I bought one of the first Trad Pros way back when they first came to market-that was about 10 years ago and I still get blown away by her amazing tonal response and ease of playing,I can play for hours and my hands never feel fatigued.
  4. Back when the first Epi Les Paul Traditional Pro came out about 10 years ago,I made a bee line for my local music store to try one out.I plugged a beautiful wine coloured Trad. Pro into a Fender Blues Jr. and was blown away by how much the guitar sounded like a vintage PAF 'burst Les Paul and immediately bought the guitar.No matter what amp I play this guitar through,she never ceases to amaze me-she is exceptionally heavy when I turn up my old JCM 800 2204 stack and let her wail-of course she also can weep like an angel when you coax some classic blues riffs from her.For my money the Trad Pro is one of the best guitar buys around today.
  5. I have a 2002 Epi EJ-200 Natural made in the Samick Korea plant and she sounds huge!!!!She came from the factory with a Gibson logo imprinted in the truss rod cover and certainly sounds much better than any of the current EJ 200s and I'd have no qualms about putting her back to back with a current Gibson J-200 in a sound comparison.The only criticism I have about my EJ-200 is that it's not acoustic/electric.I am hoping to put a Fishman pickup system in her some day down the road because she sounds so fabulous aux natural she would no doubt sound phenomenal with a quality pickup system installed in her.
  6. As far as a favourite Epi acoustic goes,I'd have to declare a tie between my Korean made (Samick plant) 2002 EJ-200 (the early Korean made model with GIBSON printed on the truss rod cover and my Indonesian made 2009 EJ-160E John Lennon model. The EJ-200 is a natural finish non-cutaway model.I'd have no qualms whatever putting my EJ-200 up against any current Gibson made J-200.The tone of the Epi is incredibly well balanced and its volume and projection is incredibly loud and clear.My nephew is a tech at Canada's largest guitar retailer and after playing my Epi J-200 for quite a while he said that it was far superior to its current Gibson counterpart in both playability and tone,in fact he said that it was closer in tone to a '50s or '60s J-200.As far as the EJ-160E John Lennon model goes,its tone-although similar to the '60s original,doesn't exactly reproduce its tone.All that changes when the guitar is plugged into an AC-15 or 30.When I first plugged my EJ-160E into my AC-15 for the first time and played the opening riff of "I Feel Fine" I immediately got a serious case of goosebumps-the closeness to the sound of the original was uncanny.I'd have no problem recommending either of these beautiful guitars to anyone,they are first rate playability and excellent tone.
  7. Thanks for posting that info,I had lost my list of Epi date and factory codes and had to try and guess from memory,the date/factory code of the beautiful near mint EJ-200 natural finish Epi that I bought a few months ago.I had figured that she was made at the Korean Samick factory in August 2002 and was the 30633rd unit made that month and I got it all right-my ancient 63 year old brain can still retain the important things in life,such as guitar and amp specs.....what a relief.
  8. Hi Folks,I haven't been on the Forum for quite some time,I had a lot of different things on the go and also had some unexpected health issues to contend with,anyway I'm back in the swing of things again-I hope.Two weeks ago I picked up my 7th EPI,a guy I know was selling a pair of Epi EJ-200s:a Gloss Black EJ-200-CE (Cutaway Electric) and a Natural Finish EJ-200 acoustic non cutaway.Since I have always been a fan of Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash I have always lusted for a Gibson J-200 (or the EPI equivilant)I prefer a natural finish and I just don't like the look of cutaway acoustics,I picked the Natural Finish one.and I'm really glad that I did.The guitar just is an incredible instrument from it's flawless construction and meticulous attention to detail with the binding and inlays as well as the internal bracing.The tone of the guitar is perfectly balanced throughout the whole tonal spectrum and it is the loudest acoustic guitar that I've ever heard,but it isn't at all overpowering or unpleasant to listen to.The neck is also the most comfortable acoustic neck that I ever played,the action is incredibly close the whole length of the fretboard but there is absolutely no buzzing at all.I'm after losing my dating and factory codes info for Epis from reading the serial numbers.Could someone please help me refresh my memory by deciphering the Serial No. of my new baby? The Serial No. is: S020830633 am I close in figuring that she's made at the Samick plant in Korea and was made on August 30,2002 or have I completely forgotten my code deciphering?Thanks in advance. BTW: Those who have been on the Forum for a few years,may remember that I'm a complete Luddite when it comes to computers and consequently have no skills in posting pix etc. I'm hoping that some time during the upcoming week,I can enlist the help of one of my computer literate buddies and I can post pix of my Epis as well as the additions I have made to my guitarsenal since I was last on the Forum,I now have 39 little darlings which isn't a heck of a lot when compared to the number of guitars that guys like Rick Neilson,Joe Walsh,Keef Richards etc. have,nor is it a lot when you consider that I've been buying guitars since the late 60s.There may still be pix in the Forum archives under the heading of Bonzoboy's Guitar Family or possibly Bonzoboy's Babies.Cheers.
  9. Hi Folks,I haven't been on the Forum for quite some time,I had a lot of different things on the go and also had some unexpected health issues to contend with,anyway I'm back in the swing of things again-I hope.Two weeks ago I picked up my 7th EPI,a guy I know was selling a pair of Epi EJ-200s:a Gloss Black EJ-200-CE (Cutaway Electric) and a Natural Finish EJ-200 acoustic non cutaway.Since I have always been a fan of Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash,I prefer a natural finish and I just don't like the look of cutaway acoustics,I picked the Natural Finish one.and I'm really glad that I did.The guitar just is an incredible instrument from it's flawless construction and meticulous attention to detail with the binding and inlays as well as the internal bracing.The tone of the guitar is perfectly balanced throughout the whole tonal spectrum and it is the loudest acoustic guitar that I've ever heard,but it isn't at all overpowering or unpleasant to listen to.I'm after losing my dating and factory codes info for Epis from reading the serial numbers.Could someone please help me refresh my memory by deciphering the Serial No. of my new baby? The Serial No. is: S020830633 am I close in figuring that she's made at the Samick plant in Korea and was made on August 30,2002 or have I completely forgotten my code deciphering?THanks in advance. BTW: Those who have been on the Forum for a few years,may remember that I'm a complete Luddite when it comes to computers and consequently have no skills in posting pix etc. I'm hoping that some time during the upcoming week I can post pix of my Epis as well as the additions I have made to my guitarsenal since I was last on the Forum,I now have 39 little darlings which isn't a heck of a lot when compared to the number of guitars that guys like Rick Neilson,Joe Walsh,Keef Richards etc. have,nor is it a lot when you consider that I've been buying guitars since the late 60s.There may still be pix in the Forum archives under the heading of Bonzoboy's Guitar Family or possibly Bonzoboy's Babies.Cheers.
  10. Last week while perusing the guitars at the Reverb.com website,I came across a beautiful "Lawsuit" copy of a Martin D-28 made by Terada,Japan in the '70s.I have found out that this guitar was not only made in the Terada factory but it was one of the last guitars made by the old Mr. Terada himself.Needless to say I ordered her and she arrived across the pond in Newfoundland,Canada,the most Easterly point of North America from Manchester,England in just 4 days.The guitar is spectacular and in surprisingly great shape for a guitar approaching 50 years old.She rings out just like a D-28 and has the same easy action.Now for the Gibson/Epiphone connection. The Terada factory was responsible for turning out those amazing Orvilles and Orville by Gibson back in the '80s and '90s.Some of these Orvilles and Orville by Gibson-particularly from the "Norlin era" were said to be far superior to their U.S. made Gibsons.I have to agree here because a buddy of mine has bought several Orvilles and O.B.G. Les Paul,Les Paul Special and Les Paul Jr. copies that were exceptional.The Les Pauls with the flame maple tops were amazingly well bookmatched and the fit and finish as well as the playability and tone was always out of the ballpark.Terada also fabricated my Limited Edition 1965 John Lennon Casino-one of the 1st 50 made- and is still making many of the upmarket Epis to this day.The 1965 and "Revolution" Casinos were "fabricated in Japan" as far as cutting and shaping the wood and assemlbling the bodies and shaping and finishing the necks-which came from the U.S.-but the bodies and necks were mated in the U.S. as well as the hardware and electronics installed and all other finishing work.Anyway it's no surprise that my Terada is such a phenomenal guitar,since I've seen and played several of the spetacular Orvilles etc. that they turned out in their factory.It's understandable why Gibson contracted Terada to construct such an incredible line of instruments,they had some of the best luthiers in Japan.
  11. Last week while perusing the guitars at the Reverb.com website,I came across a beautiful "Lawsuit" copy of a Martin D-28 made by Terada,Japan in the '70s.I have found out that this guitar was not only made in the Terada factory but it was one of the last guitars made by the old Mr. Terada himself.Needless to say I ordered her and she arrived across the pond in Newfoundland,Canada,the most Easterly point of North America from Manchester,England in just 4 days.The guitar is spectacular and in surprisingly great shape for a guitar approaching 50 years old.She rings out just like a D-28 and has the same easy action.Now for the Gibson/Epiphone connection. The Terada factory was responsible for turning out those amazing Orvilles and Orville by Gibson back in the '80s and '90s.Some of these Orvilles and Orville by Gibson-particularly from the "Norlin era" were said to be far superior to their U.S. made Gibsons.I have to agree here because a buddy of mine has bought several Orvilles and O.B.G. Les Paul,Les Paul Special and Les Paul Jr. copies that were exceptional.The Les Pauls with the flame maple tops were amazingly well bookmatched and the fit and finish as well as the playability and tone was always out of the ballpark.Terada also fabricated my Limited Edition 1965 John Lennon Casino-one of the 1st 50 made- and is still making many of the upmarket Epis to this day.The 1965 and "Revolution" Casinos were "fabricated in Japan" as far as cutting and shaping the wood and assemlbling the bodies and shaping and finishing the necks-which came from the U.S.-but the bodies and necks were mated in the U.S. as well as the hardware and electronics installed and all other finishing work.Anyway it's no surprise that my Terada is such a phenomenal guitar,since I've seen and played several of the spetacular Orvilles etc. that they turned out in their factory.It's understandable why Gibson contracted Terada to construct such an incredible line of instruments,they had some of the best luthiers in Japan.
  12. It's a fact that a guitar that sits in a case in a closet etc. for years,won't sound nearly as good or lively as an identical guitar that was constantly played over the same time period.The wood that's exposed to regular playing is regularly vibrating which allows the cells in the wood to open up and consequently vibrate more freely.The wood-especially the top-of a guitar with little or no playing with eventually tighten up the cells and the grain will get tighter and therefore not allow the wood to vibrate as freely or project the sound as loudly.This is why a lot of acoustic guitar makers will let new guitars set for a few weeks with a special device that vibrates quietly to mimic the same frequencies that regular playing put on a guitar,but these vibrations will "loosen" or free up the cells at a much faster rate than playing would and the guitars go to their new owners sounding as lively as a guitar that has been played for years.
  13. I have to laugh when I see people putting so much silly emphasis on guitar brands and especially those who insist everything other than "their" chosen brand is junk etc. As far as I'm concerned nothing screams complete ignorance about guitars more than brand snobbery.I have been playing guitar since 1964(when for my 10th birthday- 1 month after seeing The Beatles for the 1st time) when I got a no name acoustic hand-me-down from my uncle.I haven't put the guitar down since and played my first paying gig in 1969.Over these past 50+ years I have played,restored,repaired,set up etc. literally hundreds of guitars and have amassed a small collection of 33 guitars of various brands and vintages.Over these years I have observed that even the "best" brands of guitars have had some absolute "pigs" pass through their doors,I have heard and played "some" '50s and '60s Strats that sounded no better than Walmart El Cheapo guitars and the same goes for Gibsons too.Having said all that,in fact,the absolute best Les Paul that I ever played was a 1959 Epiphone Les Paul reissue from about 4 or 5 years ago.This guitar just played and sounded absolutely sublime,I was totally gobsmacked.I own 6 Epis myself and have a couple that are exceptional,but this Les Paul was an anomaly if there ever was one,even the bookmatching was in the same category as the best 'bursts from the late '50s.My biggest regret of all time is that at the time I had bought 3 new guitars,2 new amps and at least 6 effects in the previous 12 months and if I had brought that beauty home it would have caused a meltdown that make Chernobyl as inconsequential as a butterfly fart.The Epiphone name is a famously storied name and in its heydays Epiphones were the benchmark against which most other brands were judged,it's a pity that previous brain dead executives of the Gibson family of brands took that once hallowed name and stuck it on their "budget" aka "low quality" line of guitars,in the not too distant past. Thanks to the efforts of Jim "Epi" Rosenberg and the dedicated luthiers at Epiphone, the Epiphone name has been brought up out of the basement and is finally getting recognized for turning out some exquisite guitars and if allowed to keep growing,once again it will be seen in the same glowing light as its forebears.Since I own 6 Epis-so far- it's pretty obvious that I have no problem buying one instead of a Gibson-money doesn't enter into it either.
  14. I own 6 Epis 1. A '61 Les Paul Custom tribute (3 humbucker,SG body) 2. A 2006 MIK Custom Shop sunburst Firebird V 3.A Les Paul Traditional Pro 4. A 2009 Indonesian made natural finish Casino 5. A Limited Edition 1965 John Lennon Casino-one of the 1st 50 made 6. A John Lennon Limited Edition EJ-160E .Of the 6 Epis-which are all exceptional guitars the 1965 John Lennon Casino is an easy pick for the Best Epiphone.I have played many Epis over the years and I have to say that the 1965 is absolutely sublime in every way,it is the easiest and most comfortable guitar on the hands that I have ever played-it even beats out my old '65 Strat.The fit and finish of the guitar is 2nd to none-the build quality and the attention to detail is simply astounding. The sound of the guitar sets it apart from most other guitars,the Casino is in a league of its own,even the similar Gibson 330 doesn't come close to matching the sparkle and chime of the Casino.Only a Casino can ring out as clean and clear as a bell,it has all the sparkle that made Beatle songs sound so amazing to this day.Conversely the Casino can kick out some real raunch when put through an overdriven amp-even a slightly overdriven one,such as the one Paul used for the riffs after the chorus and for the outro in "Ticket to Ride" and it can also handle really heavy raunch extremely well, as in Paul's guitar work and lead break in George's "Taxman".The only other guitar I have that comes close to the '65 Casino for sound and playability that makes me want to play it more than any of my other guitars is my '65 Strat-so I think that alone is a pretty good endorsement of the Casino.
  15. I think that the difference in the exchange rate maybe partially due the US dollar getting stronger but the biggest culprit is the tanking of the Canadian dollar that was largely due to the financial mismanagement of the Harper administration,which after spending over 10 years in power really managed to make a complete balls of Canada's financial standing on world markets.The worst thing is that the new Trudeau government will have to spend and devote much of their time untangling the financial mess that was Harper's legacy,time that they should have been able to devote to social programs and our military,which are 2 more things that Harper & company managed to mismanage to a disgraceful degree.
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