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Saransk

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About Saransk

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  1. Problem with channel switching LED relay (Relay 1) works but Relay 2 appears to be stuck in the Gain Channel Because the preamp tubes V1 & V2 work for both channels I believe it is a bad relay. It's listed as a "Relay 2-24" (RLY2) on the schematic, and I can't see the part number on the part itself - does anyone know what really is a replacement I suspect it is a DPDT 12 volt relay (runs off the preamp heater DC circuit) but that only leaves a couple of thousand to choose from. Can't find a parts list anywhere. Thanks Michael
  2. Problem with channel switching LED relay (Relay 1) works but Relay 2 appears to be stuck in the Gain Channel Because the preamp tubes V1 & V2 work for both channels I believe it is a bad relay. It's listed as a "Relay 2-24" (RLY2) on the schematic, and I can't see the part number on the part itself - does anyone know what really is a replacement I suspect it is a DPDT 12 volt relay (runs off the preamp heater DC circuit) but that only leaves a couple of thousand to choose from. Can't find a parts list anywhere. Thanks Michael
  3. If you are comfortable in doing the work pull all of the crappy junk electronics out of the guitar and get a rebuild kit from one of several guitar parts suppliers. Some have them prebuilt and ready to bolt in, just solder the pickups to the switch. It will have parts like CTS pots, Orange-Drop caps, Switchcraft hardware. You would be surprised just how great a set of good pots and capacitors sound. Premier Guitar has had a couple of articles on this kind of upgrading. If you just want to do the switch, get the classic Switchcraft "tall" toggle switch - same model as you'll find in a '59 goldtop. It is one of the parts that never seem to fail. If you're going to do a fix, get the right parts. Any on-line guitar parts store, and most guitar repair shops, will stock the right switch for a Les Paul. Hardest part - running the wiring from the controls up to the switch and then back to the output jack. Good luck
  4. I'm not sure it is worth the time and effort. Depending on the glue used on the neck tang, it might be removed by steaming, but if it is a newer type glue even routing it out might not work. No way I'd ever trust a repair at this location, it needs a new neck fitted. Lots of time and unless the luther charges a flat rate - the meter keeps running. I've seen cost quotes in the $400 range depending on the neck cost. Don't assume they will be able to get a replacement neck from Gibson/Epiphone either. While the typical "Gibson" headstock failure is usually repairable, a neck break like this is fatal - it isn't a dovetail joint like on a acoustic, it's more like a glued-in Fender neck. The tang is also deep into the body - deeper than the pickup cavity - pretty much the whole thickness of the neck. Not sure if it is an option but there are on-line dealers who sell "shell" surplus Gibson/Epiphone bodies with necks. Even a used "shell" would be less expensive than the cost to replace that neck. Personally I might take a pass even if it was a Gibson SG and I was offered a lot of money to repair it. I feel your pain - Good luck
  5. Sorry about the delay in responding but I thought your response not only missed the point but was more than a little condescending. I wasn't saying that I expected an Epiphone to have the same quality (although Gibson's quality is still not what it once was) as a Gibson or Martin, but to simply abandon a product after a waranty period is over is unconscionable, especially if it was still in production. If you want to compare closer apples to apples, even out of waranty I can get a PRS SE model guitar serviced, get replacement parts, and such from PRS without any problem. PRS is a company that respects the musicians who purchase their guitars, whether a custom PRS for 5 figures or your basic SE model. What I am most upset about is that I can't even buy, for my own money, replacement parts for Epiphone guitars. I had to have my local guitar shop order a replacement pickguard for my Joe Pass Emperor, and Gibson wouldn't even tell me the price. To not even have the option of ordering a correct replacement pickup, even if I had to order the whole bridge assembly, for a guitar that is still in production, then refuse to tell me what Shadow part would be equivalent, and then basically tell me "not to let the door hit your backside on the way out" shows the contempt that Gibson/Epiphone has towards its buyers. The mark of a great company is not how well it treats those who purchase its most expensive or limited edition products, but how it treats those who purchase its entry level products. And Gibson/Epiphone treats those entry-level customers with contempt. They know, no matter who poor their customer service is, they will still sell several hundred Les Paul guitars, for inflated prices, totally based upon the level of workmanship of 60 years ago. The bottom line is that I made a simple request - to purchase a replacement pickup for my Epiphone guitar. I was prepared to have to order it through a dealer and I certainly was prepared to pay for it. I suspect I would have paid to have it installed (unplug from the preamp, cable fished out through the top, reverse steps, restring) if necessary. But to be told that I can't even purchase the part, or get it repaired for cost, is ridiculous and insulting. I suspect that if I was a "featured" artist and my signature guitar broke, I could get the part I needed. Michael Baker - Saransk
  6. I didn't have any issue with the pre-amp/battery section, it was the piezo that had an issue. There was a loss in constant signal, like a dead spot. The pickup is not the standard Nanoflex pickup, which has a long flexible sensing section, it is closer to the Shadow SH 980 Archtop Bridge with integral pickup which has a more traditional hard undersaddle element with a lead out - See photo. While I was able to make sure the original preamp worked - I had a Shadow SH980 bridge - It didn't like it as well as the original Epiphone bridge. A traditional undersaddle piezo won't work as the saddle slot is shorter than the usual acoustic saddle. An actual Nanoflex won't work as it has to have a very specific mounting setup without the hard bend out of the bridge. My biggest issue is that Gibson/Epiphone won't sell the replacement part for the guitar - I would have bought the whole bridge if needed. I've had a 1960's Martin worked on by Martin who matched a broken piece of binding. Fender may not have a lot of vintage parts, but they will send information and their custom shop will help with vintage and older instruments. Yet Gibson/Epiphone is quite willing to abandon owners, especially those who have purchased Epiphone products. I can understand a limited warrantee (5 years) on the electronics, but to refuse to sell replacement parts, or provide an equivalent from Shadow, is about as bad as customer support/relations can get. The T-Bridge, like a "Ghost" tune-omatic, or Fishman TOM bridge has individual string pickups. While summed right now, this allows connection to a hex system with the usual 13-pin output or the use of individual output adjustments per string like high-end Ovation guitars have had. Unfortunately, L.R. Baggs stopped selling a version of this pickup that was made to replace the bridge saddle in an acoustic bridge - that would have been perfect, but the TOM still sounds great on the Zenith.
  7. I don't buy the idea that "historically accurate" tuners can't work as well as new designs. It is all about the design, materials, and price point. New "vintage" Kluson, Grover, and Schaller all look like vintage but work a whole lot better than a set of 1960 parts. Although no other manufacturer appears to be making a replacement for the original Kolb/Grover sets, I think Grover Imperials sure look like the vintage Eiphone tuners - just without the E. A set of those, with a replacement knob, might mount right into the existing mounting holes - the current Grovers are based on the 1970's version with a "clipped" baseplate but the holes look like they are in the same place - there are a couple of on-line videos about replacing vintage with modern. Another replacement, Hipshot makes several that work with their Universal Mount Plate which lets you install their tuners without drilling new mounting holes. And they have a lot of knobs so you can have everything from a Grover Imperial style to an Pearl "Butterbean." You can get "Griplock" or "Classic" tuners. I put a set on a friend's Telecaster, the plate worked great replacing the original "Double Pin" tuners with a nice set of Closed -Staggered Griplocks. Not 100% vintage looking, but great for a working musician. And the originals will go right back on if he sells it. So much about my Zenith is great - the sound is wonderful, and it plays fantastic but little things like the tuners and the electronics just don't match the rest of the workmanship. Good luck Mike
  8. The piezo element of the Shadow pickup in the bridge of my Masterbuilt Zenith archtop has failed. Didn't expect it to be a warrantee repair but when I tried to find out how to order a replacement, and the part number (I've had to have a local dealer actually order a part before), I was told the parts are only available for warantee repairs. And that is only good for 5 years. I was told "You may be able to have a different comparable system installed by a tech in your area." Shadow USA wasn't helpful - and the website did not have a pre-amp that matched the Zenith's and the only piezo that looked like mine wasn't a Nanoflex, it was a SH-099 piezo element. Has anyone else had to repair/replace their pickup and/or preamp? If so, what did you do. Right now I've got a L. R. Baggs T-Bridge installed - sounds nice - but I would have like to just gotten a replacement for the original.
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