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midiman56

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Everything posted by midiman56

  1. ... and it's a Gibson, right? That was sort of the point ... Eiphone has never done a completely correct version of the Firebird. Anyway, here are a couple of pics of the Epi Firebird that I used to own. Nice guitar ... just not a Firebird in the sense that an Epiphone Les Paul is a real Les Paul, is it? Jim
  2. I ownwd an Epiphone Firebird years ago. Great guitar, but a "Bird without neck-through construction and banjo tuners just isn't really a Firebird is it? This is my Gibson Jeff "Skunk" Baxter Firebird ... one of my favorite guitars! Jim
  3. Just took this out of the box the day before yesterday ... it's been a wonderful Honeymoon so far! Here are the Sweetwater pics as well as a couple of lousy ones of my own when I could force myself to stop playing ... A 2014 Les Paul Traditional Goldtop w/P90's and a Bigsby: Jim
  4. Same here! The amber knobs work just fine with most of the bursts, but just stick our like a sore thumb on others. My trans-bule got chrome Tele-style knobs: ...and the Goldtop got the "reflector" treatment: Jim
  5. Epiphone does occasionally make some models in Walnut as limited editions (limited, I guess, by how much of the wood they can score). A few months ago I picked up a '66 G400 Ltd Ed in walnut with slightly upgraded pickups as compared to the Standard . A very striking finish, and as I remarked when I got it, none of the "muddyness" that I've heard regarding G400 pups. I can't really say if the wood actually makes a difference in the tone ... I'm not exactly a "true believer" when it come to all that apocrypha about "tone woods" on an electric guitar. All I know is that it sounds and plays great! Jim
  6. My guess is that Hippy intended to say "AWESOME"! Jim
  7. You're obviously very easy to please, Hippy! Great review of a clearly terrific guitar. So far I've been able to resist the call of these "mini-semis", but if I ever stumble across one of those discontinued Flamekats, I'm afraid I'm going to be in trouble! I LOVE that bling!!! Jim
  8. Now this one is interesting ... Toi begin with, I have no first-hand knowledge of this guitar whatsoever, but since I am always intrigued by guitars I jnow nothing about, I did a little net-digging myself. You're right, Dawg ... there is not a lot of info to be found on this guitar ... To begin with, the story about PRS sueing Gibson over this guitar seems to be the straight scoop. One look at the Spotlight and it's pretty easy to see why: The Achilles' Heel of this guitar seems to have been the Steinberger designed trem system. A very nice design manufactured by Honer but out of such cheap pot metal that one or two deep bends would pretty much destroy it. If your guitar still has the original trem, Dawg ... then you have a rare bird, indeed! Here's a picture of it along with the EMG-designed pickups: The fretboard was apparently carbon reinforced with MOP chevrons ... nice looking and should be good and strong: The body is reported to be a solid piece of mahogany, but as I said, I can neither conform nor deny. Looks good in this pic though: So ... that's all I know. Hope this helps. I enjoyed just learning about another of Epi's cool, albeit short-lived guitars! Jim
  9. I sure like playing my Epiphone Firebird VII: It is not a neck-through, nor does it have the "banjo tuners". It does however have the mini-hums. I agree with Parabar ... while the current Firebird Studio is a good guitar, both playing and looking, it is just too similar to the SG tone-wise. I suppose all sorts of mods are available to change that ... Jim
  10. Is the Saein Korea plant different from the Unsung plant? Geeze ... this is all so confusing!!! All I know is that I own six Epis: The Lucille, LP Ultra, Korina Flying V and Firbird VII are all from Korea - they are excellent guitars in my opinion and I have no issue with any of them. In the other hand, my two Prophecy GX series guitars (a Les Paul and an SG) are Chinese made - they are among the best guitars I've ever played! So there you go. Two sets of guitars made in Asia by people that don't get paid a whole lot for their labor. All of them clearly worth the price I paid for them. Being that none of these guitars are made in the USA, I personally tend to pay more attention to the sound, feel and looks of the instrument than the country of origin sticker on the back of the headstock. Then again, as I've said many times before, I don't think like a collector/investor - which would be pretty silly to do with Epiphone guitars in either case. Pretty much any collectable Epi's were made decades ago. Everything since then was built to make music. Jim
  11. Gas ... Where'd those tuners come from ... a how much major surgery was the installation? Thanks! Jim
  12. What an amazing coincidence! I just played one of these today at Cowtown Guitars here in Las Vegas! Very interesting guitars they are. I played one of the metal top LP types pictured below (they had two of them in stock).Good weight to them and very solid feeling. The tuning and intonation on the guitar was spot on (although, to me, this possibly says more about the dealer than the guitar itself). Now for the not so great stuff: the wood on this guitar felt really rough on both the neck and the body … almost sort of unfinished! I know I’ve gotten used to playing “plastic dipped” guitars, but his one went way beyond any of the “unfinished” Gibson’s or Epiphones I’ve played. It’s not a deal breaker … but it was sort of a surprise. The pickups sounded solid but had a much lower output than any of the other guitars I played today, including a couple of Epi Les Paul’s. The guitars are made in Korea and the pups and the guitars themselves are supposedly designed by Alan Entwhistle, although they are obviously taken from old Zemaitis designs (though not nearly as ornate)! They weren’t bad for about the same price as an Epiphone standard. Cowtown also had one of the abalone covered guitars as well as one of the strat shaped with the metal plate. Kind of a cool look. Jim
  13. Now that's an interesting theory, Dave ... but as a fellow Scottsman, Robert Burns once wrote: "The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley, An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain, For promis'd joy!" As for the video, thanks all for the info, gentlemen. Marroit really wailed on that thing. He's still one of my all-time favorite rock singers! Jim
  14. ...and why do I suddenly want one so badly? Humble Pie in 1971 ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZMmV6xXYFw
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