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E-minor7

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Posts posted by E-minor7


  1. Wonder what qualifications/specifications it took for ordinary infantry-men to be allowed to bring a guitar to the front. Did you just walk in and told the draft-officer, "I'm a good entertainer which would keep the spirit up over there" and then once in a while someone got thumbs up. Like "I'm an aquaralist and would like to bring a set of watercolours" or "I'm a magician and believe the coming situation would benefit from a wand, , , this silk top-hat and a dove." Eeehh, wait a minute, , , the Dove wasn't introduced until 1962 ! But still. .

    D9QBdlh.jpg

    Very nice films. Tried to find a WW2-shot of a guitar at the front that I posted long time ago - in vain. Well, , , the one above is gentler. . 

     


  2. First thought when I saw the headline : That was it, , Sal has  fallen out of love with his 45 or vice versa. .                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Not the case - good.  
     

    What year is the groovy guy playing . This is a vintage guitar with some kind of Monel or Retro strings, isn't it. . 


  3. 53 minutes ago, slimt said:

    They as in Gibson Montana did small batches of  there guitars.   Eg Montana specials , so on.  Sometimes a dealer would request 12 guitars each one a little different from the other.    Alot of that was devoted to highend dealers that had high Gibson acoustic sales.   Its the right time frame for the Custom shop.    But those would of been floor run guitars.   I had a Maple bird just like yours given to me from John Walker one night when Ren, John and a few others were sipping on a few playing Foozeball.   Excellent evening. 

    You bet - must have been quite a high flying nite - one of those you never forget. . 


  4. Something tells me he has a lot of 200s. Cat/Yusuf is seen with so many versions the recent years. 

    Here at the other hand a rare glimpse of a blonde 68/69 Bird, , , 

    Yusuf Islam to honour child refugees in London gig

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   .   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   .   .   . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   .   .   . . , , , with new tuners. . 


  5. It is probably a longer scaled and heavier braced design than the model it sprang from. These moves too happened in 68 and it made the CWs (and others) something else.                                                   You may know that the square shouldered version of the Country Western was introduced in 1962.


  6. You may call the bridge backwards, , , but it actually wasn't for the times. Gibson turned them 180 degrees during 1968 and they stayed that way through the 70s. I'd say yours is a 1969/70/71 Country Western with the not so loud rosewood saddle-insert. As you may know the alternative in ceramic. Check the serial # on the headstock and look it up here.

    http://www.guitarhq.com/gibson.html

    Then do come back and share what you found.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Btw. it's a good idea to show the entire guitar when asking about these things. In this case the logo matters and would literally add the overall pic. 
    Hope you enjoy the old square - something tells me you do. 


  7. 1 hour ago, zombywoof said:

    Those nuked burst finishes are without a doubt the best looking since Gibson started spraying with opaque lacquer.  

    I swear though there are times when I think Bozeman selects specific years to  assign to guitars by picking one written on a piece of paper drawn from a hat.

    Hehe, , he, , ,

       .   .  .  .  .    .  .   🎩

       .   .  .    .  . 🌟1957 ! 


  8. I remember hearing this song for the first time. 

    I had been in the studio all nite making demo's and now drove home with the engineer in his car. Suddenly this number came through the radio and I immediately thought it was from a local program called The Demo-Doc (where upcoming acts sent in their stuff and some were lucky enough to get air-play).  Quite big was the surprise when we learned it was a new international artist. 

    But listen :

    What made Krawitz sensational at the time - and we're writing 1989 - was that he went back to the old desks with tube-gear, outboard and all sorts of vintage stuff. Until then the production culture, not least in the 80s, had been a race toward bigger-bigger-bigger, new, newer, newest, more expensive, , , , and the closer the studios got to a space-station the better.  Krawitz looked through all this and penetrated the hype with a genuine passion for sonic old-school. I'm not a fan and never was, but this vision was a huge achievement and he should be praised for it.                                                                           Well, fortunately that has happened - but let's not forget.


  9. Thanx for posting this A/B, PB ^ to me both Jumbos sound terrific, , , warm and full of atmosphere and timbre. 

    Feel like bein' a bit drawn to the maple, , but then again it wouldn't mean much 's as I just as often pick the rose while blind-testing. I guess one have to sit down with them live to really understand which to choose for what tunes. Like said so often before : We seriously sense every aspect of the other guitar while playing the first vice versa.                                                                                       And that game is an everlasting thrill. 


  10. 4 hours ago, 12MoreGuitars said:

    The southern jumbo and the country western are in my eyes the most fantastic  examples of just the right amount of show (bling) to go on a guitar without making it where you wouldn't want to take it out to the river or park or a honkytonk or just anywhere it could get scratched or bruised. I love Humingbirds, Doves too. They just are so pretty and sound so sweet. You are ready to fight for them and defend them from being used improperly or passed around recklessly.

     But an Southern  jumbo or a country western! They are ready to go out and put a tear in your beer. With a little class. Its like they wore there sunday best to the barn dance Saturday night.  I am awaiting my brand new SJ and can't wait to take her out to meet the boys.

     

    Well spoken ^ Welcome


  11. 2 hours ago, QuakerOatmeal said:

    Photos taken this past week when I changed the string and polished her up ! It's more like a reddish brown, or dark brown pumpkin maybe.
    Unfortunately, I'm honestly not qualified  enough, to do a review xD
    Side note- it's the best smelling guitar I have ever whiffed.

    It's beautiful, , , and a lot like the Vintage and True Vintage models. Guess back'n'sides are  darker too.  Enjoy the smell - it won't last forever. 


  12. 1 hour ago, Leonard McCoy said:

    I started this guitar tab in 2006 but must have quickly given up (the intro and bridge parts are difficult to figure out) realizing it went way over my head. Fourteen years later and I managed somehow. Life doesn't seem so bad.

    Bravou - I still lean on your spells when heading into the instrumental maze of Oh Very Young. . 


  13. 2 hours ago, ALD323 said:

    UPDATE: I ordered these Herco Flex 50 picks for the Hummingbird to see if they would help bring out the so called nectar tone so often talked about. They did and they work well, and I  like the gold bronze color and feel and tone of the Herco!  I also like the Dunlop light grey .60 picks for this as well as the Fender thins. All three seem to work well with the Herco having just a tad deeper tone overall...the Fender thins a lighter tone, and the Dunlop .60 falls somewhere in between my ears tell me....but honey with all three in varying degrees.  And so all three seem to produce the honey pretty well when held and used correctly.  Holding but not squeezing the pick helps...a lighter strike attack helps greatly also letting the pick tip brush and glide over the strings vs the slightly harder attack I was using on the J-45. All in all I have indeed discovered that tone I had been craving from my bird but was just not getting. I had been using a harder pick, and striking too hard, and not remembering to use the picks nearer toward the bridge when I want these tones. I had also been using Dunlop Ultex .73, and also Fender Mediums. Those will still likely be my go to pics on the J-45, while the Hummingbird, I will stay with the nylons or the thin fender as they all sound really nice. Thanks all for your help!

    Sounds great ^ glad you came closer to the precious N, , , and I'm almost sure there'll be more of it now that you have found out where to look.                                                                                                                                                                     The right touch will do the rest.  Enjoy

    9qYxWF9.jpg


  14. Quite often you can see which is which by the string-marks on the upper-side of the saddle.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 To avoid any circus, I have a tiny pencil-B on the under-side of all my saddles. And, , , actually have one where the treble is higher than the bass - a vintage weirdo ? -                                                                                NO, , , one of the 2012 Hummingbirds.

    But mister mr.chEn - no harm in trying it both ways. Will teach a lesson about 'feel' also. 


  15. 23 minutes ago, zombywoof said:

     

    It depends on what version of the J45 you are talking about.   Unless things have changed, the J45 Standard has rear shifted bracing.  The J45 TV (or whatever  they are calling the current version) has the same forward shifted bracing as found in the AJ although I believe the angle was not as wide as in the original AJs.  

    Don't know if things have changed, but according to Polecastro's well known bracing video from 2012, the 2 have the X in the same position, but with different angles. The TV then had a wider X, which of course makes things end up near the point you are making : a looser top between the hips where it really matters.

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