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bobouz

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bobouz last won the day on February 9 2018

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About bobouz

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  1. Unfortunately, someone is trying to pull something shady.
  2. There’s a ton of variation in Guild necks during the ‘70s & ‘80s. They can range from chunky to very slim.
  3. I never was much taken by the folk era Dylan, being someone who leaned more heavily towards '50s rock & the blues. So of course where he came alive for me was Hwy 61 Revisited. Still truly love that album. Through all the ensuing years, there are so many scattered gems Dylan has left us. Can't imagine that all of his work actually "works" for anyone, but it would be nearly impossible to not have connected with something along his path. You like country? Dylan wrote some of the best country songs I've ever heard for Nashville Skyline & it seemed to appear out of nowhere. And even with his voice going bad, his incredible phrasing could still deliver very powerful stuff in the format of a song. Things Have Changed comes to mind. Then a few more years down the road I heard the album Modern Times, and was once again totally astonished at the ongoing quality of what Dylan was putting out - even with a wet noodle of a voice. This song about JFK is just more of the same. Can't say I'm crazy about it, but I sure do appreciate the work itself - and in that sense, it's just one more link in a very long & fruitful chain.
  4. I totally agree, but would prefer to see alternative woods used, such as walnut, baked maple, morado, etc - and clearly list materials used in specs. Back in ‘01 when Martin made the switch I mentioned above, a number of folks thought they were buying a guitar with ebony B&B, only to later discover it was micarta. Since dealers didn’t realize Martin had made the switch, they couldn’t inform customers. This was Martin’s first application of a composite-type B&B, and it was months before they put out accurate spec info. It just left a lingering bad taste, as did my one very negative experience with richlite. These days, I’d buy a used instrument with specs to my liking before going down the richlite road on a new guitar.
  5. Micarta & richlite have been a big “NO” for me since 2001, when Martin changed the specs of the 16-Series in mid-year from striped ebony to micarta (board & bridge) without telling anyone, including their dealers. Pissed off a lot of people, including me. The one time I weakened, was in 2011 with the purchase of a Midtown Custom - which I believe was Gibson’s first foray into richlite. After a year, the neck had developed a backbow that couldn’t be adjusted out. Never ever will buy another.
  6. Actually, I’m already fortunate enough to have the J-200 & Casino/330 bases covered. I was just thinking about how these two specific guitars (Dylan & Lennon) might play & sound, after having spent so much time staring at them. The full-size album cover of Nashville Skyline made it seem like that sunburst J-200 was practically in your hands!
  7. I’d like to play the J-200 Dylan is holding on the cover of Nashville Skyline, just to see if it was really worth drooling over. And maybe Lennon’s Casino. Not asking for much 🙂
  8. Absolutely. It would be one thing if a person were marooned on an island & could do any stupid thing they want without impacting others. No one here is living alone on an island.
  9. Larson - As far as your 2000 Les Paul Standard Plus goes, it almost certainly would have come with 490R/498T alnico humbuckers. I happen to have the 2001 catalog, and every LP Standard model came with the same 490/498 combo (that includes the Std, Std Plus, Std Smartwood, Std Raw Power, & Std Double Cutaway). Gibson did not make many changes from year to year back then, so there's a very high probability that all LP Standards came with the same pickups in 2000. Without taking your guitars apart, catalogs or online data would be the best way to get specific details on pickups. Edit: The model number, as opposed to the serial number, may also provide some clues. The model number might appear on your sales receipt if you were the original purchaser, or possibly on a COA if the guitar came with one. Given the model number (usually a combination of letters & numbers), Customer Service in Nashville might be able to decode it for you.
  10. bobouz

    Unusual J200

    I’ve had both a Dove & Heritage Custom from the early ‘70s that utilized the same bridge (but not the same inlay). Personally, I think that guitar is a beauty. I would not shy away from giving it a test run & serious consideration. Most of the negatives from that era revolve around instruments being overbuilt in order to enhance durability. It’s not as if the workers in Kalamazoo totally forgot how to build a good guitar!
  11. Ah, so yours has 17 frets clear of the body. I did own the Korean Peerless Casino - but sold it after purchasing an Elitist, so can’t help with dimensions. Best of luck in sorting this out.
  12. Lorda mercy. Facts are facts folks. This virus is spreading like wildfire & it happens to be particularly hard on older individuals. Panicked over-reaction is one thing, but if someone chooses to be a poorly informed dolt & bury their head in the sand, it’s like my wife always says: Natural Selection. Regardless, there is a silver lining: Being at home more means more time to sit & relax with the instruments.
  13. There’s someone on Reverb who has some NOS pickguards from the Terada-body built ‘65 Lennon Casino. Specs are shown in photos. If this one could possibly work for you, the price is very reasonable. Look up Epiphone Elitist on Reverb & it’ll pop up.
  14. Lovely! I almost bought one of the single pickup models, but passed due to the center positioning of the P90.
  15. Another derail - There was also a version with mini-humbuckers!
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