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rlan52

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About rlan52

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  1. I would definitely use the case and a shipping box. If you live in Manhattan you can go back to Matt and ask him for a guitar box, break it down so it's easy to carry home. If not, you can go to 48th street and ask in any of the stores. They routinely break down shipping boxes and throw them away. If you live in Westchester you have Guitar Center and Sam Ash. You can also arrange for UPS or Fedex to do a home pick up for a pretty nominal fee. I think the last time I shipped a guitar I had Fedex pick it up from the studio and it cost ann extra $12.00 which to me was well worth it. Personally, I would not trust UPS or Fedex to advise or build a shipping box for a guitar. The people that work at these places are very adept at shipping but usually know nothing about the nuances of shipping guitars. My 2 cents. Good luck...
  2. I bought one last year after longing for one for many years. I had never played one but it was just one of those guitars that you see and have to have? Anyway, I bought it from "Musicians Friend" and when it arrived it was as beautiful as I expected. It sounded great un-amplified and was built perfectly. However, the neck was so huge, the shoulders at the nut so wide that I knew within 5 minuteds I could never get used to it. I have a number of Les Pauls one with a 50's neck profile that I find a bit tedious to play but, I can play it at a show for an hour. The ES-137 Custom neck was way too big for my small fingers. IF you have large hands, fingers and love a 50's profile neck than you will absolutely love the ES-137 Custom. For me, the most comfortable neck I have ever played was my ES-339 60/30 neck which I stupidly sold to fund the purchase of the ES-137. Subsequently, "Musicians Friend" took back the ES-137 and refunded me in full. I then purchased the second guitar I had been lusting after for many years, an ES-347 (1990) which is now my go-to guitar for everything. So, while I am bitter about losing my ES-339 my story has a happy ending. The ES-137 is a great guitar and sounds terrific. I also love Ebony necks...
  3. The ES-333 had the satin finish and the neck binding but no Holly on the headstock. The Gibson Logo was like that of an ES-330. Hence, at a certain point you could buy the ES-335 satin without neck binding but with the normal logo and Holy or, an ES-333 with neck binding and the less expensive headstock logo. The ES-333 also has the trap door in the back for easy access and the pickups were the 490t pair. The ES-335 satin I think had Busrtbuckers. The ES-333 was much less expensive than the ES-335 satin and eventually Gibson discontinued the ES-333 and then a couple of years later added neck binding to the ES-335 satin. I am one of those who feel that if you are buying a Gibson, the neck binding with nibs is essential so, I went for the ES-333 and with the money I saved I replaced the pickups with a Classic 57 set with push pull. I really wanted to buy the ES-335 satin and in the store it did sound very nice but I could never get used to the unbound neck. It felt like I was playing one of my Start's or an Epiphone Dot. Today, I love my ES-333 and am glad I bought it. I am not wanting for the more expensive logo design and Holly and the neck is pure #E-335. If I was buying today, I would not hesitate to buy the ES-335 Satin with the neck binding. I actually love the satin finish on my red ES-333...
  4. I did not think the ES-339's were available in Block Inlay's?????
  5. Yes, I agree 100%. The way the binding is done with the nibs is one of the main differences between the feel of an Epiphone guitar and a Gibson guitar. Yes, it is true that you probably can not get the Jumbo high frets but a lot of luthiers will be able to re-bind the guitar with the nibs. And just for the record, with me, it is not about what the guitar looks like, it is what it feels like. For me, the difference between the ES-335 Satin unbound and the cheaper ES-333 bound with nibs was very big as it relates to feel. I bought the ES-333 because of the feel. Also, after many years of Tele's and Strats, no matter how well made and expensive, those rolled edges ultimately start to stick out and you can feel them when you play. I recall having the luthier roll the edges every time I had a set up done. I even bought a file so I could do it myself (which did not work out very well, Ha, Ha). I don't doubt that the re-fretted Gibson sounds and looks great without the nibs but I don't see how it could possibly feel the same. Just my 2 cents...
  6. I have been having all of my guitar work done at Rudy's for the last 20 years. The address of Rudy's Music is 169 West 48th but the repair shop is around the corner on Broadway between 48th and 49th (kind of above where the old "Metropole" used to be). I haven't been to them in just about a year so it's best for you to stop in to the store on 48th and they will direct you to the repair shop around the corner. You can also google them and call in advance but my experience is that they always ask you to bring in the guitar for them to inspect before they quote a price. I think Rudy's is rather expensive in relation to other shops but I have always had great results with them and they are very reliable about having your guitar done when they say it will be done. I have had one guitar set up done at 30th street vintage on 30th street because it is across the street from where I often rehearse. He is very good as well, but my guitar was not ready when he said it would be and I had to rent a guitar for a rehearsal. Good luck and keep me informed...
  7. I also have an ES-347 (my Avatar) and although mine does not need a re-fret, I think what you're luthier is talking about is that he doesn't feel he can keep the nibs/nubs or the binding over the edges of the frets. To me, this is the single best quality of a Gibson. I also own an ES-333 and at the time I had the choice of purchasing an ES-335 Satin with no binding or the ES-333 with the great faded binding. I have not looked back. My ES-333 is a great guitar (I have changed the hardware and pickups). Back to binding, my luthier here in NY did a re-fret on my old Les Paul Standard about 5 years ago and for an extra fee he was able to install the binding exactly as they do at Gibson, with the nibs/nubs. Mind you I paid a good $80.00 more for the re-fret but it was very worth it. Also, I had to get the same fret gauge that was previously on the Les Paul, I could not get the big Jumbo frets I had initially asked for. When I got the Les Paul back it was as if I had just purchased it. The end to that story is that I sold my beloved Les Paul to fund the purchase of my 1990 ES-347 and have not looked back from that either. I absolutely adore my ES-347. In more than 30 years I have owned more than 100 guitars and this ES-347 is by far the best I have owned. The neck which is unique fits perfectly in my hands and the Bill Lawrence pickups (usually found in the 89 and 90 models rather than the Dirty Fingers)are terrific for both live sound and they sound great going direct into Pro Tools. The older Ebony neck is very much like the ES-355 and Les Paul Custom. I think they use Rich-lite now. I also agree that you should have it professionally set up before deciding on a re-fret. The frets on my ES-347 are kind of flat (not as flat as yours) but they are flat type of frets. If it definitely needs a re-fret, ask your luthier about installing new faded binding after the re-fret so you can retain the nibs/nubs...
  8. I would only be concerned where they say "New Patent Sticker". That might indicate to me that the guitar does not have the original pickups of which I would argue that while a Norlin, I would much prefer the 1971 pickups to the new stuff...
  9. Is anyone sure about the fretboards? Of course the Midtown employs the richlite material. How about the 356 and 359? Are they Ebony or the new richlite? I had the ES-339 and used it extensively for over a year. It was a great guitar and my favorite neck carve is the 30/60. However, at the end of the day, sonically, it didn't offer much more in sound than any of my Les Paus. Of course it was a joy to play but I ended up selling it to fund the purchase of a 1990 ES-347 with Bill Lawrence Original pickups. This ES-347 offers such a difference in sounds and the ebony neck is great. Un amplified the ES-347 has almost a piano like tone rather than the woodsy tone of my ES-333 which I also love. This brings me back to my point about Fret boards. From my Les Paul Custom to the ES-355, the Lucille, The ES-347 etc. The ebony fret board brings a sound of it's own combined with the woods used on the body. With the ES-347 we add in a lot of extra brass but even the ES-355's I have played at least to me, sound much brighter with the ebony fret boards then the semi hollow guitars with rosewood fretboards. So, in response to the question at hand, do the guitars in question have Ebony fret boards or richlite and, is that brighter sound one that is appealing???
  10. I just bought a Neumann TLM 102 at Sam Ash for $699. It has turned out to be the best investment in Mic's that I have made. My acoustic guitars have never sounded better. Vocals are really high end even in my home studio. I am currently using it with a Golden Age Pre 73 and I love it. Previously, I had been using an AKG "Solid Tube" with the upgraded tube and the capsule modification. That did yield good results but never seemed to play well with the Golden Age Pre 73. I usually ended up using it with my Mbox Pro Firewire mic pre's. I highly recommend the Neumann TLM 102 for acoustic guitar and vocals. It is a small microphone but packs a big punch...
  11. I have been using Pro Tools for many years as I use it in my work. My first home version was 7.0. First off, I would not waste my time on Pro Tools if you have no recording experience or, if you don't have some basic knowledge of computer based recording. As with everything software, there is a learning curve and with Pro Tools, the learning curve can be quite tedious. So much can go wrong at any time. Just go to any of the "Pro Tools" forums for insight. That said, there are some computer based recording packages out now that are better for easy entry into the world of Computer based recording (DAW or Digital Audio Workstation). M-Audio has some nice entry level interface/software packages that won't break the bank and are easier to set up and use right out of the box. Lexicon has an interface/software package that is very solid as well as inexpensive. As for the question at hand, I absolutely love Pro Tools 10! I run it at the studio in HD but at home I have the basic set up on an iMac and on my new Macbook Pro. For me it is stable and fast especially on the Mac Book Pro with 8 gigs of RAM. Pro Tools 9 is also great. Being able to use any interface is a big addition although, I am currently using the MBOX Pro firewire which I love. I think the mic pre's in the MBOX Pro are great and as a direct box my guitars really sound great. I am thinking of picking up an Apogee Duet to use with my Mac Book Pro in a more mobil way. But the depth of what is available in Pro Tools 10 is mind boggling. The low latency monitoring is worth it's weight in gold. If you are not experienced with DAW recording, you can still purchase a Pro Tools 10 system but be prepared to invest a lot of time and energy before you will yield anything productive. If you have the time to invest and are willing to study the manuals, be heavily involved in the forums and in general, really study, the rewards are extremely high/great...
  12. It looks perfectly real to me...
  13. My ES-339, Antique Red, also has a 30/60 neck and I just checked the COA and it also has a "1" at the end. I own two ES-333's which have a much thinner neck and I do love the 30/60 profile. I don't know why they don't use it on more models...
  14. That was great. Loved it. Especially the ending. Post more if you get a chance...
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