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amx05462

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amx05462 last won the day on November 8 2011

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About amx05462

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  1. i put one on my strat and on on my wildkat. not all that difficult and they were a big improvement.
  2. be careful withthat truss rod. my advice would be tale it to your local luthier. i had one in an epiphone sg strip out a few years ago. that being said.. the best penetration oil ive ever used is called kroil i bought it onthe net http://www.kanolabs.com/msn/ at the same time i bought a can for my brother. i havent used mine but he used it on many things and on his boat trailer which has had stuff seized from being imersed in salt water. also i loaned my can out to a friend who couldnt get the boat motor leg off his engine. again imersed in salt water . he got it off the next day after spraying it with this stuff.
  3. defenitly no grpunds on the pots in the picture thats what the extra clump of solder on them is for. just look up gibson wiring diagrams in yahoo. youll see whats wrong
  4. great job! i always turn three of my tom bridge saddles around . same problem and thats the fix .
  5. not sure what amonia is nor do i really care. it gets my guitars and windows clean. it also keeps wild animals from tearing up my trash bags. helps to do a good job on my floors. i dont care what it is . it does the job and ive seen no problem with finishes or dry fret boards in 40 years. . im not looking for right im just saying what works for me. on the other hand if using cigarette lighter fluid. ( naptha) works for you or what ever your using. thats good. btw amonia however spelled is the key ingredient in windex.
  6. to each his own.. again never had a problem.. btw thats amonia D lol. been using it for 40 years now. again never a problem.. ;)
  7. well speaking as a former smoker ( one week now) lol most of my guitars have there fair share of cigarette ash on them here and there so to be honest . a little dirt here and there isnt a problem for me . but that again is me. when i restring . i give them the once over with some windex and some oil on the fret board. lately ive been using this combination bees wax and lemon oil stuff on the fret board and back of the neck. good stuff. makes for some fast playing with no drag . you put it on then after a while you buff off the excess. ..
  8. btw as to the stuff and the strings .. there may be something to that . what you put on your hands may well cause a buidup of dirt etc on your strings. then again those slick strings that some manufacturers sell that feel oily from the start dont seem to do that. who knows . wipe your strings down too i guess might be good advice..
  9. well being a machinist ive been known to play my guitars with cutting oils on my hands and have yet to ever have a problem with any finish on any guitar i have. or have had.. my personal opinion would be if it doesnt hurt your dry skin which since i have that myself know that the dry skin is much more sensitive to stuff than any guitar finishes.. rule of thumb for me is... if it dont irritate your dry skin. id say it wont irritate your guitars finish but thats me.
  10. if you start here and click on previous button then you can see the steps i went through with this guitar. and the end result is the last photo. i started here so you could see the mess this guitar was when i bought it. i also had to straighten the neck. it has no truss rod so i used a method from dans book. but the body finish was a mess. so you can clearly see whatyou can do withthe dyes and some clear coat. youll see some dust on the top of it befor it was reassembled. well its not dust but cigarette ashes..lol. but they atrent in the finished picture. had the deck door open and woops.. fortunately the finish coat was hardened by then.
  11. well what id do based on the review is get the color in the dye section and then drop fill the clear coat. basicly drop filing is done with the clear by diping a small stick or brush into it and touching it to the area needing to be filled. after filing the area to just slightly above the original finish you fine sand it to level then buff the area. ive done this on guitar tops based on the instructions in dan erlewines book and it works well. dans book is avalable from stew mac as i remember. being as the back of the joint is not flat youll have to do a bit then let it dry and work your way around. but from what i read in the reviews of those sticks. they arent really meant for that big of a job . more for small dings. sounds like youll end up with a mess rather than a nice looking fix.
  12. yeah dan erlewines book tells you just what to do on this. i would think though that you would be better off getting some real hyde glue and a glue pot for this. the titebond is good stuff for regluing a top or a crack but the neck and headstock take more pressure and real hyde glue is stronger. im guessing the original joint was done wrong and thats why it seperated.. you can get that glue on ebay in the luthier section of the guitar area. it will be much stronger with that . in the mean time dan has alot of videos on youtube and on the stewart mcdonald web site. you might find one there on this subject. for the price id buy the guitar too. good luck with it. http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Glues,_adhesives/Wood_glue/Behlen_Ground_Hide_Glue.html
  13. it looks from pics that its a normal 1/4 inch output but it would help if you could post a pic of the jack taken out of the guitar.
  14. had a few tursers over the years and currently own a jt res. they are nice guitars for the price and well worth repairing. stew mac may have a matching dye for your guitar i used there dyes on a refinish of the top of a guitar from the 40s and it was a perfect match so you may want to look at that . keep up the good work.. and thanks for the pics and articles.
  15. well then best of luck my friend im sure youll find one on ebay there cherry seems to be the most common color these days.
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