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theForgottenCereal

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About theForgottenCereal

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  1. Thanks to our insane cat who is prone to leaping around like he's on PCP from time to time, my LP needs a new pickup selector switch. He knocked it over (stand and all) so that it did a perfect belly-flop onto the hardwood floor, and the threaded metal part of the switch broke off still in the plastic cap. I guess I should count my blessings, I think maybe the switch kind of broke its fall since I found no other damage to the guitar at all. For now I've just filed down the sharp edges so I can still use what's left of the switch. Since I have to get a replacement anyway, is there a "Cadillac of switches" or should I just head to the store and get whatever one is on the rack? I would imagine a switch is a switch is a switch, but just thought I'd ask.
  2. My most treasured instrument is a '65 SG special with a neck joint repair. I probably paid too much for it, but the repair was really well done to the point that I forget it's even there. It's a wonderful playing, beautiful sounding guitar and it would take a hell of a lot more than it's market worth to get me to part with it. So the point is that a guitar can still be a great instrument even if it has had a major repair. Don't pay too much for it, but don't turn your nose up at a damaged & repaired instrument for that reason alone. If the repair has been done properly by an expert, you might be getting a great instrument at a great price. Here's a video (that was already linked to elsewhere on these forums but I can't remember where) in which Edge from U2 talks about his explorer's broken headstock:
  3. Single-cutaway is the only Junior for me, so I would go with the BJA. But keep in mind that the BJA's pickup is a hum-canceling "H-90" as opposed to the classic P-90.
  4. The 61RI is pretty high up on my "wanna get someday" list. I prefer the vintage-style small pickplate and the more contoured body, not to mention those '57 classic pickups. 61RI is the top dog of all SG designs IMHO. Of course I've never touched the Krieger one mentioned above or the Angus one, for all I know they could be great too. Find a dealer and check 'em out yourself if possible.
  5. My mom found a '79 cherryburst that she bought as a gift for her husband and it's probably the finest I've ever played (which i suppose isn't saying much, but I've played a few vintage SG's and LP's in my day). It's heavy as hell and it has the best action on any vintage instrument I've ever had my hands on. Plus it's got that huge headstock which I think is really cool and they should definitely bring back. No "pancake" construction, so separation is not an issue.
  6. I got an Ampeg Reverberocket, made circa 2000-2004 i think, used for about $350. I doubt you could beat it for the money for a big ballsy rock'n'roll/alt-rock sound. I'm not sure of the wattage but I would guess 50-ish. 2X12 combo, all-tube, and I could swear that they specifically had the Les Paul in mind when they were tweaking the sound. Awesome gain channel when paired with a humbucker LP, clean channel isn't bad but could be better.
  7. Remember, just because someone puts an instrument up for a ridiculous sum of money, that doesn't mean anyone's going to buy it. One selling strategy on ebay is to start with a high price and see if anybody bites, then keep relisting with a slightly lower price until it sells.
  8. I had a studio that I bought in '98 (if I remember right) for $900 brand new, and it was an awesome guitar. Emerald green, Grovers, perfect neck, great feel, and most importantly, dead-on LP sound. I eventually traded it in on a vintage Fender bass because I was playing bass in a band at the time, but now I really, really wish I had kept it and just paid cash for the bass. So I can definitely recommend finding a good used studio from the late 90's. I think the studios have a simple sort of beauty, and provided you don't get a lemon, they're one of the best guitar values you can find. I currently own a honeyburst 60's tribute studio and it's awesome. Great burst finish, great feel, great P90 sound, nice simple woody look. However, from what I've gathered, the quality can vary wildly between examples, so play before you pay whenever possible. I guess my point is that in my experience a studio can give you all or more of the quality of a standard/custom/whatever without the visual frills if you get your hands on a good one.
  9. Just do what I do... leave the instrument alone and put stickers all over the case.
  10. Not my own, but I was at sam ash the other day and they had one in honeyburst with about the same level of faux arm-wear as yours. Maybe as more are being made, they are being told to make the worn spots more noticeable? I've also heard that some of the goldtops have a greenish tinge to them, ostensibly to mimic the oxidation of the metallic flecks that went into the gold paint of the originals. Does yours have any of that?
  11. Haha, I feel your pain; in my photo above I swear the case has been open for about 90 seconds and that clump of cat hair has already managed to drift its way onto the guitar.
  12. I'm with you. Change this thing to individual bridge saddles and bone nut, and I'm on board. Also would like to see ebony, white, and/or faded brown finishes, but i guess it's such a niche instrument to begin with that they don't want to mess around with anything other than the iconic cherry. Also, does anyone know if it's angled or straight neck? (Look at me acting like I'll ever afford one. )
  13. My '65 Special spends almost all of its time in the middle position, with all knobs on 10 except the neck tone, at about 6.
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