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martinh

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About martinh

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  • Birthday 05/15/1959

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    Tulsa, Oklahoma
  1. Brian Eno and Harold Budd - The Pearl. Not too rock 'n' roll I'll admit.
  2. humm....... when it comes to the "need for a therapist " the need to obsessively go on on on about your opinion regarding Led Zepplin and your unique veiw of copyright law comes to mind
  3. The review is fairly typical of the mindset Rolling Stone was building and encouraging at that time. Its journalists seemed to have suffered some form of collective trauma caused by the Beatles arriving in '64, and spent most of the late 60s and 70s slagging off or minimizing anything British. A few years ago, someone gave me a "Rolling Stone history of Rock" published in the late 70s, in which devoted five pages to the Grateful Dead, seven pages to Bob Dylan and a page to Led Zepplin ( mostly uncomplementry). The Stones were the only other Britsh band that merited a mention. In fact, Zep garnered almost universally bad US reviews for all their work. Presumably Atlantic wasn't passing out enough money and drugs to the "music press"
  4. In my experience, noise ordinances are never about the volume of noise, they're about who or what is making it. Young person, amplifed music -. "very bad noise" will result in ticket if audiable at any level in the street. Court will grant injunction forbidding practice in house. Construction work, High school football game, four wheelers- "good" noise - will never be ticketed by local police even if 10 times the level of the above. court will never grant injunction.
  5. Thumbs up on the Strat Elite. I have a Floyd Rose Strat with the pickguard and electronics from an Elite transplanted on (some routing required!), and I think its one of the most versitile tone setups out there.
  6. I'm afraid Chanman is right. You are, at best, a co-owner of any copyright in the song, and if you didn't write the melody/lyrics, but only the riff, the other party generally has a stronger case than you do. This is why Chuck Berry can't sue every one that does a solo with his signature "4 to 5 against root" bend, and Bo can't sue eveyone that does a "Bo Diddly" beat. At best a court would have to decide that your contribution was significant enough to amount to co-authorship. Just use the riff again in another song.
  7. If it does end, I'll be really pisssed that I didn't buy a very expensive intrument six months ago on a "no payments for six months" offer.
  8. The technical answer is that there is no "proper place to attach a ground" onto most old 2-pin amp chassis. On these amps, the neutral is usually already attached to the chassis. This was normal construction for many years. The neutral is strapped to ground at the point where the electrical service enters your house, so the chassis is effectively grounded anyway. Modern design and code standards actually discourage strapping the neutral to ground anywhere else (e.g. at the amp) because of the potential for creating ground loops. IN NORMAL USAGE, these amps are pretty safe UNLESS THEY HAVE ONE OF THE OLD, UNPOLARIZED PLUGS. In that case you can simply reverse the plug in the socket, and now the LIVE is connected to the chassis instead of the NEUTRAL. This will not immediatly shock you under normal circumstances, unless you're standing outside in a pool of water. A pair of shoes and a concrete floor form a pretty substantial insulator. The danger occurs when you encounter another piece of equipment where the chassis is normal. e.g., grounded, or connected to neutral. This typically tends to be a microphone with a grounded case connected to another amp. Then, the chassis of your amp ( and hence the ground of your cable, and THE STRINGS OF YOUR GUITAR) is connected to the LIVE, and the micrphone case is connecetd to NEUTRAL/GROUND. Touch the microphone with your hand while holding the strings, and POW, 120 volts between your two hands, and a current travelling across your heart. This is what kills people. The solution used to be to add a polarized 2-pin plug to all these old amps, and (if the amp has one) wire around the switch on the back that allowed you to reverse polarity. Nowadays it's hard to find even polarized 2-pin plugs, so I use a three pin plug, but cut the ground pin off so as not to give the impression that the amp has a ground wire. The only other danger of these amps is that, because they have no ground wire, they will not set off a "ground leakage trip" of the type found in older house wiring. Therefore if the situation is reversed, and you amp is at neutral, and you touch something live, the current will flow aross you, to neutral, and not to ground, and will not be detected by a ground leakage trip.
  9. Rico is still alive? .... Well I'll be dammned!
  10. I'm going to see that show on the 10th. Glad to know it will live up to my expectations.
  11. Teachers generally stress the thumb in the center of the neck becaue they mostly encounter the opposite - self taught players who keep their thumb on the side of the neck. The position works great for some things, as other posters have pointed out. However it does tend to restrict the span of your hand. Teachers are big on hand span becaues it very helpful if you are a sight reader, as most teachers are. My bass teacher told me to do this when confronted with an unfamiliar piece to sight read - "scan the whole piece and see if there's a note above B If there's not, you can play the whole piece in first position, and it will be easiest if you stay there." However to do this, you must have the thumb in the back of the neck, because most people (on bass) canntot reach from first to fourth fret with the thumb on the side of the neck. I dont read guitar, but I assume the same thing holds true ( but with a greater stretch) i certainly belive that, by keeping the thumb on the side, many players deny themselves the ability to play ceratin scale shapes thet they could play with the thumb in the center, which tends to encourage "blues box" playing. The best skilll to lean is to know when each position works best, and to switch between them without concious thought.
  12. these are the ones that were hung up last time i took a photograph. There are about eight others. L-R (top) 2010 335, 1972 deluxe (modded), 67 Rick 360, ESP strat., Fender Strat Elite. (bottom) 66 Rick 4005, 79 Rick 4001(custom), 65 Fender Precision. Peavey MidiBass. Unknown Fretless Not shown: ESP Tele, Epiphone Emperor Regent, Sigma Acoustic, 12 string Strat, Fender precison plus with Moses graphite neck, Fender Precision Lyte (2), Gibson SG III,
  13. I must admit that the art of cutting and pressing good vinly seems to be a dying one. I've bought a few new "audiophile" pressings of vinly I had from 30-40 years ago, and mostly found them disapointing compared to the somewhat worn and noisly original presssings. Part of this is because "original master tapes" were not really designed to last 40 years. it's a magnetic medium, and it gradually loses high end every time it's played, and also loses high ends and is subject to "print through" when the tape sits sandwiched betwen to other pieces of tape, as it sits on a reel. Sometimes a copy made from the "original master" may not be as good as a 20 year old digital copy of the same original master.
  14. As I understand it, Page paid for the recording of the first Zep album himslef for exactly that reason, He didn't want the record company's producer or a house engineer telling him how it should sound. However, he hired Glynn Johns, who was a very traditional engineer, and the two purportedly had some huge fights over Page wanting to do various innovative tricks on the recording.
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