Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Bliggick

All Access
  • Content Count

    36
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2 Neutral

About Bliggick

  • Rank
    Member
  1. Yes, I guess I could do that if I could remove it without damaging it. Better still, remove the cap from the broken knob. Because as you can see, the font doesn't match the other knobs and you should be able to see the letters are not even spaced evenly. The whole point of my post is that I paid for Gibson USA quality and I suspect I was sold import quality parts, like somebody at Gibson just thought (to quote their classic phrase) that this "is good enough". It's like paying for steak and getting hamburger.
  2. That's what I have to ask myself from my experience. A few years back I bought a new black Gibson USA SG Standard. A marvelous guitar. Anyway, I managed to damage one of the black reflector volume knobs. No problem, I thought: the store where I bought the guitar carries lots of Gibson parts. I then bought a blister pack of 4 black reflector knobs proudly branded Gibson USA. When I got home and went to replace the knob I noticed something was off. On close inspection the knob didn't match at all. "Volume" printed on the reflector top didn't match, the font was smaller. And overall the quality of the plastic was less and the white numbering did not line up the same as the knobs already on the guitar. The space between the M and the E is too wide also. It was however a perfect match for the knobs on an Epiphone that I also owned. So what's going on here? Is Gibson selling cheaper import parts for Epiphone as Gibson USA replacement parts? I have to wonder. And you can't say the USA knobs changed over time because this was within 2 years after I bought the guitar. See photo. The knob that doesn't match is lower left neck volume. Note font and number alignment. Sorry, the guitar is also due for good cleaning and string change.
  3. 1. A Gibson True Historic 1959 Les Paul. 2. A Vox AC30HW60 60th Anniversary Hand-wired AC30 amplifier 3. A leather strap 4. A cloth woven cord 5. Fender thin celluloid picks. I'm ready to gig. I'll kick in the rest if $10,000 isn't enough.
  4. Sorry double post, please delete: It's possible that putting on a set of new, high quality strings might fix the problem. In the past I had purchased a couple of Epiphone electrics and the intonation was way out on the lower strings. Without even trying to adjust the saddles I put on new, good quality strings and the difference was like night and day. Then only minor intonation adjustments of the saddles was needed. If you sense that the strings are bad, change them.
  5. It's possible that putting on a set of new, high quality strings might fix the problem. In the past I had purchased a couple of Epiphone electrics and the intonation was way out on the lower strings. Without even trying to adjust the saddles I put on new, good quality strings and the difference was like night and day. Then only minor intonation adjustments of the saddles was needed. If you sense that the strings are bad, change them.
  6. I have one and love it. Check these two videos. I call this the "Elvis in Hollywood" model. Same dull finish, same pickguard.
  7. This guy never gets any recognition it seems, but where would a lot of us be now if it weren't for him?: Mel Bay
  8. I'm fortunate to have a few Epiphones in my stable already, but if I could add a few more I would like an Elitist Casino, a 62 Crestwood before they are all gone and maybe a Broadway. I tend to go for Epi original models -I have a few Casinos, a 62 Sheraton and Sorrento and a Regent; all fine guitars and keepers.
  9. One cool thing I noticed about the Coupe: access to the upper frets. It looks like the neck joins the body at the 19th fret! Also diggin' the looks of the amp.
  10. Elitist Casino because it would be the ultimate Casino for me after trying all the cheaper models, and the 62 Crestwood because it's like an SG which I use for all my gigs and these Anniversary Epi's are all outstanding values for the money.
  11. Very nice rendition and presentation. Thanks for making this video and sharing it with us. Merry Christmas.
  12. I've been playing slide for 40 years and I can only tell you what works for me. I play slide with my ring finger and I've been using a glass Jim Dunlop model 212 for the past 20 years. I find it's light, fits my finger perfectly and stops at the second knuckle yet it is easy to slip on and off in the middle of a song. I used to use a lightweight chrome one but lost it a long time ago and haven't found a suitable replacement. You can make a loose slide fit better by dripping melted candle wax inside but be careful not to burn your finger when shaping it. I'm too old and lazy to carry guitars to a gig just for alternate tunings so I usually just play in standard tuning. Sometimes I play in "lazy open G" by only tuning down the high E string to D. I find that I can play most of the signature open G licks plus play normal rhythm stuff on the lower strings. Also because I'm only changing the tuning on one string I can do it quickly on stage and not stop the momentum and clear the dancefloor. Good luck!
  13. The OT said "Users" and Brian definately used a Casino to play Little Red Rooster on The Ed Sullivan Show, for instance.
×
×
  • Create New...