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Bliggick

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  1. Yes, I guess I could do that if I could remove it without damaging it. Better still, remove the cap from the broken knob. Because as you can see, the font doesn't match the other knobs and you should be able to see the letters are not even spaced evenly. The whole point of my post is that I paid for Gibson USA quality and I suspect I was sold import quality parts, like somebody at Gibson just thought (to quote their classic phrase) that this "is good enough". It's like paying for steak and getting hamburger.
  2. That's what I have to ask myself from my experience. A few years back I bought a new black Gibson USA SG Standard. A marvelous guitar. Anyway, I managed to damage one of the black reflector volume knobs. No problem, I thought: the store where I bought the guitar carries lots of Gibson parts. I then bought a blister pack of 4 black reflector knobs proudly branded Gibson USA. When I got home and went to replace the knob I noticed something was off. On close inspection the knob didn't match at all. "Volume" printed on the reflector top didn't match, the font was smaller. And overall the quality of the plastic was less and the white numbering did not line up the same as the knobs already on the guitar. The space between the M and the E is too wide also. It was however a perfect match for the knobs on an Epiphone that I also owned. So what's going on here? Is Gibson selling cheaper import parts for Epiphone as Gibson USA replacement parts? I have to wonder. And you can't say the USA knobs changed over time because this was within 2 years after I bought the guitar. See photo. The knob that doesn't match is lower left neck volume. Note font and number alignment. Sorry, the guitar is also due for good cleaning and string change.
  3. 1. A Gibson True Historic 1959 Les Paul. 2. A Vox AC30HW60 60th Anniversary Hand-wired AC30 amplifier 3. A leather strap 4. A cloth woven cord 5. Fender thin celluloid picks. I'm ready to gig. I'll kick in the rest if $10,000 isn't enough.
  4. Sorry double post, please delete: It's possible that putting on a set of new, high quality strings might fix the problem. In the past I had purchased a couple of Epiphone electrics and the intonation was way out on the lower strings. Without even trying to adjust the saddles I put on new, good quality strings and the difference was like night and day. Then only minor intonation adjustments of the saddles was needed. If you sense that the strings are bad, change them.
  5. It's possible that putting on a set of new, high quality strings might fix the problem. In the past I had purchased a couple of Epiphone electrics and the intonation was way out on the lower strings. Without even trying to adjust the saddles I put on new, good quality strings and the difference was like night and day. Then only minor intonation adjustments of the saddles was needed. If you sense that the strings are bad, change them.
  6. I have one and love it. Check these two videos. I call this the "Elvis in Hollywood" model. Same dull finish, same pickguard.
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