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Gilgamesh

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About Gilgamesh

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  1. Hello Folks, I have #83 of 1965 produced, a coveted very low number. I purchased it from Rainbow Guitars here in Tucson last summer, still as "new", never played over the years, because the headstock required repair after an accident in shipping from the factory. The guitar remains excellent, as new, not a blemish. I wouldn't have noticed the headstock hairline remnant of the repair if it hadn't been revealed. So I bought it as a player, a bit cheaper than a new es330. It is a magical guitar. I had bought it to replace a Gibson es320 with musicmaster pickups that I decided weren't tonally what I wanted on my recordings. However, at this time, I have come to know that I prefer PAF's. What degree of sacrilege would it be to pull the p-90's on this guitar and replace them with the vintage 1968 T-Tops I have had surplus for some time. The body would need routing... Yes, I should really buy an es335, and to first sell the Revolution intact... But the guitar needs to be played and those PAF's need to hum... Comments from those who know and care, please. Gilgamesh
  2. Hello Bunky, I have #83 of 1965 produced, a coveted very low number. I purchased it from Rainbow Guitars here in Tucson last summer, still as "new", never played over the years, because the headstock required repair after an accident in shipping from the factory. The guitar remains excellent, as new, not a blemish. I wouldn't have noticed the headstock hairline remnant of the repair if it hadn't been revealed. So I bought it as a player, a bit cheaper than a new es330. It is a magical guitar. I had bought it to replace a Gibson es320 with musicmaster pickups that I decided weren't tonally what I wanted on my recordings. However, at this time, I have come to know that I prefer PAF's. I came to this site tonight to ask the Epiphone forum what sacrilege it would be to pull the p-90's on a JL Revolution and replace them with a set of vintage T-Tops I have had surplus for some time. The body would need routing... I should really buy an es335, and to first sell the Revolution intact... But in my mind it is a player, as excellent as my 1968 Les Paul Custom. Would you be sympathetic to such an instrument? Gilgamesh
  3. Benedetto used two feet, D'Aquisto made solid and massive bridges. Both claimed their selection was taken into account when they selected the tonewood and carved the top. On a factory archtop, it will be a matter of replacement trials, most usefully with a Logic recording of each attempt. Assuming you can carve a bridge. Gilgamesh
  4. Nearing the end of an extensive restoration of my 1968 Les Paul Custom, having completed the electronics and the tuning machines, I noticed the fingerboard had some gaps in the grain between the 16th fret and the end of the fretboard. I added some lemon oil to the ebony fingerboard, several coats until it was slow to gas off. When I restrung, some buzzes had developed. The relief between the first and the neck frets was essentially zero – it moved, but, like, a 64th. I imagine the oil swelled the neck enough to add the back tension. The truss rod was free wheeling... Do any of you have experience with a similar dry fingerboard situation? I have lived in the desert Western Colorado and Arizona for 2 decades, but I always keep the case shut tight. Anyway the damage is done to the extent that it is damage. It seems the oil has become its own problem. The wood splits were relatively innocuous. Is a different oil available, perhaps? Thanks, Gilgamesh
  5. Lefty, I can try to answer to the 68 Custom part of your inquiry. I have a right hand Custom from 1968. It will get down to originality, condition, and covetousness. My Custom was "improved" when I bought it in 1980. This was common back then. Recently, I removed the Grovers and the Seymours, having found correct gold Klusons and T-Tops on eBay. I gave up on finding pots and knobs from 66-67-68. These are unobtainium without robbing a couple original lesser models. Your Custom should have gold hardware. The correct gold witch hat knobs are extremely rare. Gold Klusons are rare. Gold screws are hard to find... Ascertaining the actual year is a bit muddy as well. But best prices go to the 68. The 69 and 70 fall off sharply thereafter but look nearly the same. You have the critical issues of neck tenon length. There are three versions. The 68 will have the long tenon, under the neck PU, traveling nearly 1/2 the width of the cavity. Pot dates are very important to inspect. Your case should be the black violin case with orange velvet. Check out this website for facts: http://latesixtieslespauls.com/common.asp If it is in correct, unmolested condition, a righty is often listed for 10-15k or higher. They don't tend to sell there, though. It seems that the pricepoint for an excellent conditioned example is dependent on the rare buyer and how badly he needs it. It is a kick-*** guitar – equal to a burst, perhaps – with all the right pieces in place. I wouldn't sell mine for less than 20k, so I will keep it. As a critical buyer, take the time to assess originality and to establish with confidence the actual production date of the guitar, then barter down if possible. You would probably be the expert on converting this info to the lefty world. I would guess they prices would be about the same, since supply and demand are constant over the population. Best wishes, Gilgamesh
  6. You only get to write off taxes if you have extra money. Most of us have no experience in such matters... Yet, I still manage to buy guitars somehow...
  7. Yes! I have been buying 50's and 60's Harmony archtops since 1990. They have a great thick neck, excellent mojo and are essentially indestructible. I mean, they go camping without a case. One of them went down the Salt River in a dry bag. Ok, it broke, but just the top around the lower bout. I threw the piece inside and it still sounded, well, pretty damn good looking at the river over the campfire. They used to be $75. Now they are up to $125. And they are American made. Gilgamesh
  8. I did a similar repair to my 1943 L-50. The frets were ok but the fingerboard dropped off over the body, losing the playability of those notes. I removed the frets and leveled the fretboard. It plays like a dream now, but one of the pearl dots sanded trough and needed to be replaced. Overall, I sometimes wonder if correcting the fault wasn't an even trade for losing some of the original mojo. The brazilian rosewood actually looks brighter and more colorful, but – out of place... Gilgamesh
  9. I guess they also add some cover to the attachment points. With the Revolution Casino they replicated the mounting holes for Klusons under the Grovers, replicating exactly Lenoon's guitar. I imagined he may have added parts to the bridge. Thanks! Gilgamesh
  10. Hello Folks, I have found several answers to my question, which is the problem. Photos of actual specimens are tantalizingly unclear due to the necessary angle of the camera and the position of the wires as they approach the pot lugs. I am certain about the connections to the volume pots, but the capacitors seem to be soldered to the center or the counter clockwise lug of the tone pots. Some wiring diagrams call the center one 50's, others call it modern. My instrument is soldered to the center lug, but it has been tampered over the years and has become unreliable as a correct example. Does anyone know if the 68 reissue was wired Modern or like the 50's schematics? Thanks, Gilgamesh
  11. I am simultaneously restoring my 68 Les Paul to original condition and customizing my new Revolution Casino. The Les Paul had the usual tricks done before I bought it in 1980 – Grover's and Seymour Duncan's. The irony of the situation is rich: The Custom had USA Grover's which would improve the authenticity of the Revolution reproduction both in terms of parts and spirit. But doing so will repeat the error I am trying to repair with the 1968. Strange world, No? Gilgamesh
  12. I recently purchased a 1999 Revolution Casino. During set up, noticed that each threaded post has two thumbwheels, one supporting the bridge as regular, and the other down on the lacquer. What is the purpose of the additional wheels? Do they act like a lock nut? Do they support the bridge? I can imagine the necessity more on a Bigsby model... Thanks, Gilgamesh
  13. I have an interesting situation with a recently purchased Made in USA Epiphone Revolution Casino and its Grover tuning machines. The Revolution is intended to be an exact replica of John Lennon's 1965 Casino, including the "blonde" finish he converted it to. Another appointment is the Grover Rotomatic's that Lennon replaced, as so many did for its original Kluson's. I also have a 1968 Les Paul Custom that I have recently begun to restore. Having found an original gold set of Kluson Deluxe's, I removed the Gold Grover's that someone had traded out in 1969. These are made in USA Grovers, with several identifying qualities including their casting shape. Gibson/Epiphone did as much as they could to use the best parts available, but the Grover's, though they look right are Japanese copies. You can probably follow my thinking, now – although it would be an improvement to the concept of the model to upgrade the tuners' authenticity, it would be making the same mistake I am trying to correct with the Custom. Life is strange, no? Gilgamesh
  14. On another forum i use, i am able to upload photos from my hard drive under 2 mb. I have a 500k limt here. So if i have multiple posts with photos what happens to the other posts pix if i delete them from manage attachments? are the other posts shagged? Do i NEED photobucket to make multiple posts with pix on Gibson?
  15. My 68 Les Paul has had Grovers since I bought it in 1982. I have sourced correct Klusons and T Tops. I wish I could find pots and knobs... The Grover replacement is troubling me as to strategy of repair. As you can see from the pix, all six escutcheons compressed the veneer, leaving a donut slanted towards the nut. The adaptor ferrules will leave a bullseye effect. The guitar is not perfect otherwise. It has some nice checking on the headstock. The neck has worn through to mahogany , and there is a cymbal crash ding near the upper waist on the top. Looks good, but not minty. Range of ideas: No finish treatment Merely add black lacquer to bare wood (with a brush?) Swell the compression with heat and water, then add paint to bare Dowel and refinish faceplate I wonder if anyone has met this challenge before and can offer some beta. Thanks, Doug
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