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booismycat

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About booismycat

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  1. I was recently searching guitar sites and noticed that the Gibson ES-137 was listed as "No Longer Available". Does anyone have any information regarding this? True/Not True? I have a Gibson ES-137 Custom Blues Burst in "Like New" condition that I have to sell and was wondering about the resale value. If anyone can provide any information on this... thanks in advance!
  2. Yes, I've stretched the strings multiple times. Could be they need more. Yes, I tune flat to sharp. I'll restring it and check the slots. Thanks!
  3. I purchased a brand new ES-137 about 1 yr ago and I can't get it to stay tuned. Any suggestions on what I should look at in trying to resolve this? All original equipment at this time. Maybe 20hrs of play time (at home) since purchased.
  4. I see that Gibson now uses a Plek machine on all Custom Shop guitars. I am in the greater Memphis area and wondering where I could go to get my guitars Plek'd. I just had a conversation with someone who had it done to one of his and he says the results are amazing. Trouble is, his source is 650 miles away...
  5. Can't help with the arm guard... but, if you check out the post regarding the ES-137 Finish Question, you'll get what Gibson recommends for cleaning.... my response post there came right from the Gibson Service Center.
  6. Thanks for the reply.. I'm now hearing from close friends that they have experienced the same thing with Gibsons so I'm a bit surprised over the lack of responses received here. I sent email to Gibson on this subject and received the following response: Thanks for writing!! Congratulations on your new ES-137. I recommend using the Gibson pump polish for the first couple of months (just spray on the cloth and wipe the neck down after you play, or during). The neck on mine actually stopped getting sticky after a few months, and I quit using the polish after that except for deep cleanings. However, if your neck does not get better in the next couple of months, follow the instructions below. For "sticky" necks: I would suggest that you apply naphtha (lighter fluid) to a clean cotton cloth and rub this on the neck of the guitar. Sometimes this will produce a cloudy or hazy appearance but, if you will follow up by polishing it with Gibson guitar polish, it will shine it properly. This is the method used by our repair facility and it is imperative that naphtha is the only liquid used as any other type of solvent can damage or destroy your finish.
  7. I recently purchased an ES-137... my first Gibson. I have a PRS Singlecut Goldtop and a Fender EJ Strat also... only pointing this out as reference. On the Gibson, while playing... 5 minutes or 5 hrs.. I get a gummy feeling while holding the neck.. mostly around where the binding and paint come together. It's as if the heat of my hand is softening the finish. I have to wipe it down periodically and clean it to keep it bright and new looking. Neither the Strat nor the PRS ever exhibited this problem. It's so annoying that I'm not thinking of purchasing coin gloves which I would cut the fingers off of and use every time I play the Gibson. Outside of this, the ES-137 is fast becoming my favorite guitar. Anyone run into this and find a solution?
  8. Not sure what you are looking for as far as information about the Memphis plant. For a serial #... you can go here - http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Support/SerialNumberSearch/ Doesn't identify the plant of origin but, the documentation tells you what plant makes what.... not model specific so I think you'll still have questions. Go to Gibson.com and look at bottom of screen... lots of places to go for information there.
  9. If you go to the user comments on the Guitar Dater website, you will see many comments indicating erroneous information. I don't want to trash the website but it seems like a place you shouldn't take too seriously. But, if you insist... maybe you should direct your questions there. As for your question - I'm in total agreement with you but, from what I understand... and I could be wrong... is that the Memphis plant is not that old. It's possible that Gibson has not yet updated their database to point to the Memphis site as the plant of origin and Guitar Dater is simply pulling data from Gibson, providing it to you. Kinda tough to keep your own "comprehensive" database on what serial number was made where.
  10. I'm no expert on Gibsons so I can't comment beyond what you seem to already know. Based on Serial Number Search at Gibson.com, it does indeed indicate a 2005 issue. The big question here is where did you buy it? If you bought from a dealer, they should have given you the 2005 selling price - not the 2007 selling price... and they should have known what year it was made. If you bought via private party, that person could have made an honest mistake. It's not uncommon to find a dealer with one or more brand new models from previous years.
  11. If I were in Vegas, I'd bet that Ignasius is correct. I recently downloaded the Gibson BlueBook ($15) off the web and found the following: ES-150 (1946-1956 MFG.) - similar to ES-150 (pre-war model), except has slightly larger 17 in. body, layered black pickguard, silkscreen peghead logo, laminated maple body, P-90 pickup in neck position, and side mounted jack, mfg. 1946-1956. Grading 100% 98% 95% 90% 80% 70% 60% MINT NEAR MINT EXC+ EXC VG+ VG G N/A $2,750 $2,300 $1,950 $1,700 $1,500 $1,250 In 1950, bound fingerboard with trapezoid inlay replaced original part/design.
  12. I live in a bordering town just outside of Memphis, TN. and ever since seeing the Blue Burst ES-137, I have drooled over getting one. I finally placed an order with Martin Music for one ES-137 Custom with gold hardware. Yes, I could have ordered one through another guitar store or via the internet, but chose not to. Although I have to wait for this to come in, the manager at Martin Music told me the following: Due to being so close to the Memphis factory, he will actually go there and personally pick out my guitar. This surprised me but, he states he does this all the time. Every guitar that Martin Music sells gets a complete check out before it is handed over to the customer. If the setup is not spot on... they adjust accordingly... at no cost to the customer. Granted, what I was told could have been nothing more than BS... but, I purchased a PRS 20th Anniversary Single-cut Goldtop from them before and the time spent with me as a customer and their overall attitude has made me a firm believer and I feel comfortable that they are being straight with me. Bottom line, for those near a Martin Music store... if you haven't been there before, you might want to drop by and check them out. Outside of the above, I have absolutely no affiliation with Martin Music stores.... I'm no more than a customer.
  13. This URL might help you. http://www.sonfatherguitars.com/repairs.htm#Archtop
  14. Trying to identify the differences that justify the price difference in the ES-137 Custom over the Classic. As I see it: On the Custom, you get 57 Humbuckers, a varitone switch and the split-diamond inlays and head stock. On the Classic, you get 490R and 498T Humbuckers, no varitone switch and the standard perloid inlays with the 'C' inlay at the 12th fret. This is based on all the literature I can find related to both models. Hardly justifies the $700+ price tag for the Custom. Granted, the split-diamond design is nice but, the humbuckers are a $150.00 upgrade and one 'could' add the varitone switch to the Classic model. Reason for my question is I just have to get my hands on the Bluesburst and would love to have the Custom for the inlays... sad to say, the Custom doesn't come in the Bluesburst color.
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