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hqew2013

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  1. Reading the headline, you might think you’re about to receive some crystal-ball prophecy, but I have to admit that when it comes to predicting the future, I’m probably as clueless as anyone else. Truth be told, if I knew with certainty where our favorite instrument is heading, I’d be working on that design instead of writing about it here! Given the enduring popularity of vintage instruments, one might wonder if change will ever occur. Oh yes, there certainly has been change in recent decades, but typically this technical evolution leads right up to our instrument’s output jack and stops. Whether it’s loopers, effects processors, or recording equipment, the vast majority of digital, high-tech developments take place in gear used in conjunction with the bass, rather than in the bass itself. So instead of repeatedly revisiting history, why not indulge a bit of brainstorming? Let’s begin in an area that has seen some innovations in recent years. Tuning. Interestingly, tuning is an area where innovations have popped up on a bigger scale. Developments include servo-based automatic tuning devices, such as Gibson’s self-tuning Robot Les Paul, Gibson’s Min-ETune, TronicalTune’s headstock-mounted retrofit packages, Peavey’s instant onboard electronic pitch-correction, or the purely mechanical EverTune bridge. These technologies have yet to enter the bass market, but it may only be a matter of time before we see versions of these systems designed for low-enders. One can only speculate why automated tuning has such appeal to musicians. Are we getting too dumb or too lazy to tune by ourselves? One undeniable advantage of a self-tuning system is the option to access different tunings with the press of a button. That’s a huge advantage for performers—a self-tuning guitar can replace three or four instruments onstage and reduce to mere seconds the time it would otherwise take to swap instruments. Setup. For many artists—especially those not traveling with their own technician—touring through different climates causes an instrument’s setup to drift, and correcting this problem is annoying and time-consuming at best. Add in some bad luck and you can even end up with an unplayable bass. All this, when you simply want to focus on showing off! Using materials that are immune to environmental changes might be a solution, but these options already exist and haven’t really put a dent in the market share of wooden instruments, but more on that in a moment. I’d expect any artist to be able to tune, but I’ve seen many who aren’t familiar with how to deal with setup issues on the road. What if we could make robotic drives to adjust the setup? While almost everything electric around us gets packed with all sorts of sensors, most of us are still running around with some 1950s or ’80s bass technology. Imagine a motor-driven truss rod that moves once a laser along the fretboard edge detects a less-than-optimal neck relief. The bridge would need some fine-adjustments too, but with an audio-analyzer detecting a buzzing string, it could give the servo-controlled bridge a simple “up” instruction. To keep everything within your personal playing style, the bass could come with a preset “buzz-annoyance eliminator” button! Material. Whenever the discussion of future instrument design comes up, one of the main topics is: Will there be a successor to wood? Alternative materials exist and the Stash stainless steel bass shown in these photos is just one way to make use of them. Current alternative materials include steel, aluminum, carbon, acrylic glass, PCB circuit board and Plexiglas, and some of these have appeared before in bass history. What sets the Stash bass apart from many others is that its design doesn’t stop at finding a replacement for wood. Instead, the construction and material follow a concept. Now, whether you like the concept or not, what you end up with is far from the “I only like red basses” kind of thinking that permeates our world. The Stash certainly doesn’t represent the future for the masses, but it’s a great example of thinking out of the box. Regulations on the use of exotic woods have generated a lot of attention in recent years. Be it Gibson’s dispute with authorities or the latest CITES rules governing endangered woods, these regulations further reduce the availability of what traditionally is seen as good tonewoods. The use of local wood or other green initiatives will become increasingly more crucial as a sales argument. It’s certainly not necessary to join the discussion and debate about future instrument design. After all, good instruments already exist and there’s a lot of good music being made with them. But how long will this last? It’s a question that should concern anyone who depends on instruments to make a living, including manufacturers, retailers, and even those who write columns about gear!
  2. From the GW archive: This story was originally published in the January 2011 issue of Guitar World. Duane Allman played a gorgeous 1957 Les Paul goldtop for the first 18 months of his two and a half years in the Allman Brothers Band. He played the goldtop on the band’s first two albums, which featured the original versions of “Whipping Post,” “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,” “Midnight Rider,” “Revival” and other classics, and he played it on his numerous sessions with other artists, including Derek and the Dominos’ 1970 masterpiece, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. Then Allman swapped the guitar for a sunburst Paul, and this piece of rock and roll history disappeared into the ether. Now the goldtop is back where it belongs: in the spotlight. Today, Duane’s former guitar is on display at the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House in Macon, Georgia. What’s more, it can be heard on a new recording, Guitar Magic, by the Skydog Woody Project, which also features the 1976 Gibson Thunderbird bass once owned by late ABB/Gov’t Mule bassist Allen Woody. The story of how Duane and the goldtop became separated is a classic tale of guitar lust. On September 16, 1970, the Allmans played a show in Duane and Gregg Allman’s hometown of Daytona, Florida. Duane, fresh off recording Layla with Eric Clapton and company, was, as usual, playing his ’57 goldtop. The opening band was a local group called the Stone Balloon, whose guitarist, Rick Stine, was playing a 1959 cherry sunburst Les Paul, which caught Duane’s eye. While making Layla he had fallen in love with Clapton’s cherry sunburst. Wanting one of his own, Duane offered to swap Les Pauls with Stine. When Stine balked, Allman upped the ante, throwing in $200 and one of his regular Marshall 50 heads. Stine agreed, but Duane had one caveat: he wanted the goldtop’s pickups for his new ’burst. The electronics were swapped, and the deal was done. Exactly one week later, on September 23, Allman played his new guitar when the Allman Brothers Band performed at the Fillmore East in New York City, a fact born out by video footage from the show. He played his new cherry ’burst throughout the rest of his career, which ended far too soon when he was killed in a motorcycle crash on October 29, 1971. Meanwhile, Allman’s original goldtop drifted around Daytona, passing through the hands of three different owners, the last of which eventually sold it to a local guitar store. In 1977, the shop sold it to Gainesville guitarist Scot LaMar. He’d heard from his friend Billy Bowers that Duane’s Les Paul was for sale in Daytona, and he rushed to the store to purchase it. He paid $475, a fair price for a vintage Les Paul in 1977. The goldtop had some damage, including a bite mark on the headstock from a previous owner’s dog. LaMar had two respected luthiers refinish the guitar, but he was dissatisfied with the results and eventually had the instrument refinished by Tom Murphy, the man behind the Gibson Historic series and probably the most renowned “goldtop guy” in the world. The guitar was restored to its original glory and placed on display at the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House. Opened last year in the communal house where various members of the band lived, played and jammed together from 1970 to 1973, the Big House Museum includes thousands of artifacts from the ABB’s career. The goldtop is displayed along with artifacts directly related to it, including a shirt given to Duane by Clapton during the Layla sessions and two amps Duane used with the guitar: a Fender Showman and a 50-watt Marshall head, which were sometimes used together. Other items on display at the museum include Berry Oakley’s Fender Jazz “Tractor” bass and Showman amp, a T-shirt from the first-ever run of ABB merchandise, a Fender Bassman that Dickey Betts used during the band’s earliest days and one of Duane’s Marshall cabs. It also includes a recreation of the famous Fillmore East stage, where the band recorded its landmark At Fillmore East live album in 1970. The display includes a set of vintage Ludwig drums used by Butch Trucks from 1968 to 1970, and a pair of road cases with stenciled lettering pictured on the cover of At Fillmore East. The guitar will be on display at the Big House at least through this year, and probably longer. “The guitar is where it belongs right now,” LaMar says. “People need to appreciate it and see it.” Remarkably, LaMar’s generosity with the instrument includes a firm belief that it should be played as well as viewed. “It’s a real living legend and it shouldn’t exist only behind glass,” he says. “It’s a shame to me how many of our greatest guitars have become dead artifacts.” Putting his money where his mouth is, LaMar recently lent the goldtop to guitarist Joe Davis, who used it to record Guitar Magic, which also features bassist Garry Harper playing Allen Woody’s Gibson Thunderbird bass, on loan from Woody’s father. Davis and Harper released the album under the name the Skydog Woody Project, an amalgam of Woody’s name and Duane’s nickname, Skydog. “There was magic in these instruments,” Davis says, “and it impacted everything we did.” The project got rolling after Davis heard about the goldtop and got in touch with LaMar, who invited him to come visit. The two men spent a few days hanging out, but while LaMar showed Davis many to-die-for vintage axes, the goldtop was not among them. “I think he was testing me out,” Davis says. “He took me swimming in alligator-infested water and watched how I acted and how I treated the guitars. During those days, I got discouraged that I might never even see the goldtop because it wasn’t discussed. But we made a great friendship, which started with our mutual love of Jimi Hendrix and Duane Allman.” At long last, LaMar produced Duane’s 1957 goldtop and shocked Davis by asking if he wanted to play it. “I knew right away that this is the perfect guitar,” Davis says. “I went home satisfied that I got to see the Layla guitar and thrilled that I got to play it.” Davis could barely dream that within months he would be in the studio recording an album with that piece of rock and roll history. “It’s the first time I‘ve recorded an album and not thought about how it will sell at all,” says Davis, who has released four other CDs. PCB circuit board “I’m just thinking about how it happened and feeling very pleased that I had this opportunity.” LaMar says he was just happy to see and hear the guitar being put to good use. Derek Trucks has also performed with the instrument, and LaMar hopes Warren Haynes will lay his hands on it soon as well. “I want people to see it and hear it,” LaMar says. “It’s not my guitar; it’s Duane Allman’s. I’m just babysitting.”
  3. The middle-aged woman with crimped hair standing in General Admission on the Key Arena floor may have been the most telling sign of just how many years Nine Inch Nails has been around. Or the woman in the laced black corset. Or the pair of guys wearing Nine Inch Nails shirts—to a Nine Inch Nails concert. Isn’t that faux pas? In hindsight, it doesn’t matter. These fans have earned doing pretty much what they want on the sheer fact they’ve stayed loyal for 25 years. For those in attendance on Friday night, the Nine Inch Nails set seemed a culmination of all of this: 2-plus hours of the most raw, most physical rock ‘n’ roll that’s come through the city all year. But you can expect that from someone like Trent Reznor, who has re imagined what it take to create timeless, kinetic alt.-rock, time and time again. Fact: In the years since Reznor first created NIN, the sound—the direction of the band itself—has changed, and on Friday night, this couldn’t be more apparent. This incarnation of the band no longer depends on scratchy guitars and heavy percussion, but tightly wound melodies and dark, moody electronic backbeats. And at 48 years old, frontman Reznor is a different type of rock star. He’s no longer the scrawny, angst-ridden 20-something who brought us aggressive vocal riffs on Pretty Hate Machine (1989) and Downward Spiral (1994). But neither are the fans—and that’s why it works. Beginning with “Copy of A,” off Hesitation Marks (2013), the band’s Seattle set featured more than half the blues-influenced tracks from it’s newest release, as well as a handful of the goth rock tracks that first landed them on the map: “Head Like a Hole,” “Terrible Lie,” “Sanctified” (Pretty Hate Machine), “Piggy,” “March of the Pigs,” and “A Warm Place” (from The Downward Spiral) among them. The tour itself, deemed Tension 2013, couldn’t be more appropriately named. As the battle between classic rock and electronic tics raged on stage, the swarms of rock fanatics entered an uneasy atmosphere of pleasantly conflicting sounds. Even so, the performance found balance in the rigid, moody—yet controlled—way Reznor delivered each song. For this go-round, Reznor brought together a new cast of players to bring his modern stories to life: bassist Pino Palladino, known for supporting major rock and blues ensembles, including The Who and John Mayer; drummer Ilan Rubin; guitarist Robin Finck; keyboardists Alessandro Cortini and Josh Eustis; and R&B vocalists Lisa Fischer and Sharlotte Gibson, both of whom have toured with the likes of Tina Turner, Luther Vandross and the divine Whitney Houston. And while those players’ influence was felt throughout, it was on tracks like “All Time Low,” and “All The Love In The World,” that this extraordinary combination of musicianship really shined: the juxtaposition of Reznor’s feral, pointedly strained, vocals—paired with the soulful backing of Fischer and Gibson—over rumbling electronic beats gave familiar songs prompted new focus, new energy on stage. A more sexually-charged tension was revealed in tracks “Find My Way,” and “The Wretched,”—both of which found Reznor delivering chilling vocals over a slow-rolling, steady pulse. The result was haunting and romantic, a sensory overload that took the rowdy crowd to a new level of excitement. In true NIN fashion, the production of the show was just as telling as the music itself. Aided by a variety of elaborate LED lights and a jaw-dropping stage cage (now a staple of NIN shows), the songs bounced between an explosive wall of lasers and effects that both shocked and held captive the thousands of pcb board fans filling the room. Though a number of fan favorites including “Closer,” and “Only” were left on the cutting room floor, Reznor and Co. more than redeemed themselves in a five-song encore that culminated in a stirring, near-acoustic rendition of “Hurt.” Shrouded in sweat and smoke, the performance found restless bodies pinching themselves back to reality as they basked in a wave of palpable electricity.
  4. Duane Allman played a gorgeous 1957 Les Paul goldtop for the first 18 months of his two and a half years in the Allman Brothers Band. He played the goldtop on the band’s first two albums, which featured the original versions of “Whipping Post,” “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,” “Midnight Rider,” “Revival” and other classics, and he played it on his numerous sessions with other artists, including Derek and the Dominos’ 1970 masterpiece, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. Then Allman swapped the guitar for a sunburst Paul, and this piece of rock and roll history disappeared into the ether. Now the goldtop is back where it belongs: in the spotlight. Today, Duane’s former guitar is on display at the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House in Macon, Georgia. What’s more, it can be heard on a new recording, Guitar Magic, by the Skydog Woody Project, which also features the 1976 Gibson Thunderbird bass once owned by late ABB/Gov’t Mule bassist Allen Woody. The story of how Duane and the goldtop became separated is a classic tale of guitar lust. On September 16, 1970, the Allmans played a show in Duane and Gregg Allman’s hometown of Daytona, Florida. Duane, fresh off recording Layla with Eric Clapton and company, was, as usual, playing his ’57 goldtop. The opening band was a local group called the Stone Balloon, whose guitarist, Rick Stine, was playing a 1959 cherry sunburst Les Paul, which caught Duane’s eye. While making Layla he had fallen in love with Clapton’s cherry sunburst. Wanting one of his own, Duane offered to swap Les Pauls with Stine. When Stine balked, Allman upped the ante, throwing in $200 and one of his regular Marshall 50 heads. Stine agreed, but Duane had one caveat: he wanted the goldtop’s pickups for his new ’burst. The electronics were swapped, and the deal was done. Exactly one week later, on September 23, Allman played his new guitar when the Allman Brothers Band performed at the Fillmore East in New York City, a fact born out by video footage from the show. He played his new cherry ’burst throughout the rest of his career, which ended far too soon when he was killed in a motorcycle crash on October 29, 1971. Meanwhile, Allman’s original goldtop drifted around Daytona, passing through the hands of three different owners, the last of which eventually sold it to a local guitar store. In 1977, the shop sold it to Gainesville guitarist Scot LaMar. He’d heard from his friend Billy Bowers that Duane’s Les Paul was for sale in Daytona, and he rushed to the store to purchase it. He paid $475, a fair price for a vintage Les Paul in 1977. The goldtop had some damage, including a bite mark on the headstock from a previous owner’s dog. LaMar had two respected luthiers refinish the guitar, but he was dissatisfied with the results and eventually had the instrument refinished by Tom Murphy, the man behind the Gibson Historic series and probably the most renowned “goldtop guy” in the world. The guitar was restored to its original glory and placed on display at the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House. Opened last year in the communal house where various members of the band lived, played and jammed together from 1970 to 1973, the Big House Museum includes thousands of artifacts from the ABB’s career. The goldtop is displayed along with artifacts directly related to it, including a shirt given to Duane by Clapton during the Layla sessions and two amps Duane used with the guitar: a Fender Showman and a 50-watt Marshall head, which were sometimes used together. Other items on display at the museum include Berry Oakley’s Fender Jazz “Tractor” bass and Showman amp, a T-shirt from the first-ever run of ABB merchandise, a Fender Bassman that Dickey Betts used during the band’s earliest days and one of Duane’s Marshall cabs. It also includes a recreation of the famous Fillmore East stage, where the band recorded its landmark At Fillmore East live album in 1970. The display includes a set of vintage Ludwig drums used by Butch Trucks from 1968 to 1970, and a pair of road cases with stenciled lettering pictured on the cover of At Fillmore East. The guitar will be on display at the Big House at least through this year, and probably longer. “The guitar is where it belongs right now,” LaMar says. “People need to appreciate it and see it.” Remarkably, LaMar’s generosity with the instrument includes a firm belief that it should be played as well as viewed. “It’s a real living legend and it shouldn’t exist only behind glass,” he says. “It’s a shame to me how many of our greatest guitars have become dead artifacts.” Putting his money where his mouth is, LaMar recently lent the goldtop to guitarist Joe Davis, who used it to record Guitar Magic, which also features bassist Garry Harper playing Allen Woody’s Gibson Thunderbird bass, on loan from Woody’s father. Davis and Harper released the album under the name the Skydog Woody Project, an amalgam of Woody’s name and Duane’s nickname, Skydog. “There was magic in these instruments,” Davis says, “and it impacted everything we did.” The project got rolling after Davis heard about the goldtop and got in touch with LaMar, who invited him to come visit. The two men spent a few days hanging out, but while LaMar showed Davis many to-die-for vintage axes, the goldtop was not among them. “I think he was testing me out,” Davis says. “He took me swimming in alligator-infested water and watched how I acted and how I treated the guitars. During those days, I got discouraged that I might never even see the goldtop because it wasn’t discussed. But we made a great friendship, which started with our mutual love of Jimi Hendrix and Duane Allman.” At long last, LaMar produced Duane’s 1957 goldtop and shocked Davis by asking if he wanted to play it. “I knew right away that this is the perfect guitar,” Davis says. “I went home satisfied that I got to see the Layla guitar and thrilled that I got to play it.” Davis could barely dream that within months he would be in the studio recording an album with that piece of rock and roll history. “It’s the first time I‘ve recorded an album and not thought about how it will sell at all,” says Davis, who has released four other CDs. “I’m just thinking about how it happened and feeling very pleased that I had this opportunity.” LaMar says he was just happy to see and hear the guitar being put to good use. Derek Trucks has also performed with the pcb board instrument, and LaMar hopes Warren Haynes will lay his hands on it soon as well. “I want people to see it and hear it,” LaMar says. “It’s not my guitar; it’s Duane Allman’s. I’m just babysitting.”
  5. Pentru a mentine o discutie mai usor de urmarit dedicata exclusiv aplicatiilor pentru Apple iOS, s-a deschis acest thread separat. Pentru discutii despre device in general, unlocking, intrebari generale, vedeti acest thread:PCB circuit boardThe Weather Channel, cam cel mai bun program pentru vreme. Pe plata sau gratis cu ads. 2Do pentru liste, proiecte, checklists, etc. Foarte util si flexibil. Pe plata sau versiunea Lite cu functii limitate. Downtime, numaratoare inversa mai flexibila decat cea stoc iOS pentru ca permite orice valoare, nu numai 24 de ore. Gratis. Countdown, alta aplicatie similara cu downtime, se da o data fixa si arata cat mai e pana atunci. Gratis. Lose it, pentru cei pe regim. Gratis. Palringo platit merita luat, nu are ads deci incape mai mult pe ecran. Merge cu aproape toate programele de IM (ICQ, Yahoo, MSN, GTalk, AIM, etc). Chestia misto este ca versiunea platita tine conturile logate 3 zile dupa ce inchideti aplicatia si continua sa primeasca Push notifications. AppSniper este un must have. Bagati in lista ce aplicatie vreti si urmareste pretul. Astfel nu ratati zile cand aplicatii platite sunt oferite gratis sau reduse. De asemenea AppSniper urmareste TOATE aplicatiile care apar in AppStore si face lista. Daca vizitati zilnic, garantez ca nu ratati aparitia niciunei aplicatii. AppAdvice merge pe idee similara mai sus, are review-uri la Apps din fel si fel de categorii. Dintre jocuri clasice portate in App Store, de care stiu eu: Command and Conquer Earth Worm Jim Tyrian Duke Nukem 3D Doom Wolfenstein 3D Wolfenstein RPG (nu tocmai joc clasic) Palm Heroes Heroes 2 (un port cam prost) Monkey Island 1 si 2 Final Fantasy 1 si 2 Gobliiins Prince of Persia Si mai sunt altele notabile sub sectiunea Retro Games din App Store.
  6. Board Thickness .031 thickness available on 2 layer boards with solder mask and 1 oz Cu .062 Thickness available with all configurations Copper thickness 1 oz Cu available on all configurations 2.5 oz Cu available on 2 layer boards with solder mask and .062 Thickness Solder Finish Tin/lead RoHS (lead free) Immersion Silver Pads When 1 oz Cu is selected, pads for holes should be .016 to .050 larger than the selected finished hole size. When 2.5 oz Cu is selected pads for holes should be .028 to .062 larger than the selected finished hole size. Drill All holes are through from top to bottom layer of PCB circuit board. 24 preset drill sizes available. For holes = .070: finished holes should be separated, hole edge to hole edge, by a minimum distance of .017. Smallest finished hole available for 2 layer board is .020. The smallest finished hole available for 4 to 6 layer board is .014. We cannot guarantee Non-Plated holes will be non-plated. The resist on holes = .150 may break down and allow plating into holes. No Blind or buried vias. The largest finished hole size available is .25 Material FR4 150 Tg Minimum Dielectric constant 4.5 +/- .1 Maximum operating temperature 130o C Solder mask options 2 sides Green Mask only A 3 mil solder mask swell is provided for all pins/pads. Silkscreen options 2 sides available White silk only Fabrication Individual routing only Route a single continuous outline using a .093 router. The edge of the router moves a long the center of the provided outline to route the board shape. A notch in the board outline must be at least .1 to allow room for the router. A notch smaller than .1 can be ordered through the Full Feature or Custom Quote service. No internal routing allowed (No slots or cutouts)
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