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zombywoof

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About zombywoof

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  1. The Cremona line was, as far as I know, the only Harmony archtop to have a carved top. The one I lusted for was the cutaway which Harmony only offered for one year.
  2. I actually would be interested in trying out a Gibson with a terrified top. In my recent "turn over a new leaf" quest for a new/newish guitar, I did take a look (from afar) at the '42 SJ and latest versions of the Smeck Stage Deluxe and Radio Grande which all have that particular feature. So I guess they would still sit at the top of my list.
  3. This is one of those if you stuck around long enough you knew something like this would happen things. .
  4. Mahogany - but t ain't a Gibson (Burn the Witch they cried) so not officially a Stage Deluxe
  5. When I lived in MS we used to joke if you had a gun you could always get a guitar. No, not what you are thinking but Pawn Shops could move firearms quicker so were always willing to do a trade.
  6. This one ain't an original but was birthed in 2013. The whole point was to go for a now for a something completely different (for me) guitar which meant new/newish.
  7. I bought a Smeck but not the Centennial. This is the first time I have ever bought something like this I had not held in my sweaty little hands before plunking my hard earned scratch down so I am now going through the whole second guessing whether I made the right call or not thing.
  8. I done did the dirty deed. Unfortunately it was not done dirt cheap. And not wanting to have BK777 worrying that my meds need changing, it is not a Collings.
  9. Coincidentally I have found a version of the Smeck that has non-scalloped bracing. If I move on it, it will be tonight.
  10. The plot sickens. I just ran across a 1994 Gibson Centennial Smeck Radio Grande.
  11. Kay Krafts, of course, also had the Zorzi bolt on adjustable necks.
  12. Mossman breathed new life into the use of bolt on necks by high end builders. I believe the Collings are similar in that they use a mortise and tenon joint. The real issue is I cannot lay my hands on any of the guitars I have been looking at so at best have to go on memory. And that ain't what it used to be, One of the things which attracts me to the Collings I am looking at is it has a 2 5/16" string spread at the bridge. The nut is more generous than the stock Bozeman Gibson but still clocks in at just a hair under 1 3/4." The neck carve is the thickest offered by Collings. On the other hand, the Gibson Stage Deluxe which is also in my sights, while having the skimpier string spread, also has a wider nut and I believe a soft/rounded V neck which would be very much to my liking. And so it goes. Anyway, I am going to try and make a call by tomorrow afternoon as I do not want anything shipped and sitting over the weekend.
  13. Tonerite - Too funny! My daughter is a percussionist so I can always just put a guitar in the room she is practicing in. First off, "closing the door" was a bit harsh as at the moment I am waiting on a 70+ year old guitar which the owner is supposed to drop off for me to take on a test drive when it gets back from the shop. So do not weep for me. The reason I am drawn to the Collings is because as best as I can figure it is the only version of the J35 which got the bracing right. Even the Pre-War Guitar Company took liberties with it going the scalloped route. The one I am looking at is used but still not what I would call "cheap." Also on my short list is a Gibson Stage Deluxe which one of our forum guys is letting go of. Nice guitar at a very reasonable price. In many ways it would be the smart move. But then I stumbled across the latest Gibson version of the Stage Deluxe with the baked red spruce top and no electronics. The sound clips I have found of it were great at least as much as you can determine from such things. It would be the most expensive of the three. My problem is I am apparently easily distracted. . On the Waterloo guitars the only one I was really tempted by was the old version of I think it was the WLS Deluxe. I liked it because it was a fairly Plain Jane instrument but had a hand rubbed varnish top. I have no idea how Collings pulled that one off considering the upcharge for that finish. No surprisingly, it was only available for the one run. All in all though I think the guys who built the guitars the Waterloos are based on wished they sounded as good as those Waterlooos. Hard to get anything other than the lowest of lo-fi sound when say your bridge plate is made of spruce and spans the entire width of the guitar.
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