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BigKahune

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Everything posted by BigKahune

  1. Great story. Really enjoyed it. 😎 .
  2. Beautiful. Top is gorgeous. Looks spot on to an original I used to see at Elderly which had a monster price tag. Looks like Gibson did a great job with these. Congrats! 😎
  3. Slotted bridge post is wrong. Pup collar anchor screws should be flat heads. Sorry, Not a genuine Gibson.
  4. Really? Money. Profit. Just his voice as a daredevil toy in the animated film sequel Toy Story 4 (2019) and it grossed over $1 billion at the worldwide box office. Bankable for now.
  5. Thanks Nick. Gibson tends to include neck shape info in their electric specs, which makes categorizing them fairly easy. Meanwhile there will always be some variance for a particular neck shape with the handwork that is done on them. For some reason the acoustic division never got into it much. But some users can find a way to relate certain acoustic neck shapes to what descriptions Gibson uses for their electric neck shapes. Thanks again Nick. 😎
  6. I haven't seen a chart for Gibson acoustics. I did this one for Gibson electrics several years ago based on info gathered from owners - last update to it was 2016. It's somewhat translatable to acoustic. You might not find it useful, but FWIW -
  7. Looks like the original celluloid pick guard deteriorated on the guitar damaging the finish and top wood followed by a bad repair attempt. The F holes - is that white paint or binding. Headstock spray is puzzling.
  8. I would make sure the cases are protected from falling sideways, the bottom from slipping out hitting the headstock end on the floor, or tipping backwards hitting the headstock end on the floor. Yes, it happens, and these cased falls can cause damage including headstock breaks.
  9. Very nice 28. Don’t usually go for the aged/worn thing, but this particular model model looks tastefully/subtly aged/worn. I really like the look. And non-Gibson brands get posted, so no worries there. Congrats and enjoy! 😎
  10. Really nice get. You’re gonna love it. Love my 200 blondie. 😎
  11. No pics or appraisals. Just a list with insured value and they recommend to insure the replacement cost, which for the large majority of my guitars is more than I paid for them. No hassles.
  12. Seems more or less standard to me - about 1% of the insured value. I use Clarion and that’s where they’re at too.
  13. A few years ago I came across a J100Xtra for sale used. Even though it was a site unseen purchase, being a 12string fan, I couldn't resist. Turned out great - from 1995. Yep, kinda rare, so here's a pic.
  14. Quite the get. Really liking that PRS. 😎
  15. Not sure about the price, but seems in the ballpark to me. My best to you Dan.
  16. Like the paint job. Congrats. 😎
  17. Actually I have no solid conclusions on DT or any of the other coding. It's a work in progress. All of the information I have has been gathered over many years by collecting information from posts like this where members are decoding numbers and look for confirmation by consistency. Very little information has come from Gibson C/S - for whatever reason they are unwilling or unable to provide answers. So yes, you are correct in saying a lot of this is guess work. As more people get involved, information gets better. Thanks for posting the ES maestro model number (was that a 356?). Very interesting with the GM. It is now apparent to me the electric and acoustic divisions don't always use the same codes. Confusing things more is Gibson's inconsistency in wording. For example, I have a ES-359 the model name is ES359Curly on the inside label and the model number is ES359TVSGH1 (where VS is probably Vintage Sunburst finish) which seemingly decodes to a figured top - apparently using Curly (maple) and figured top to mean the same thing. I've seen that T used on both curly and quilted maple tops. I've been on this forum since 2008 and officially joined in 2009. Over those years there's been less than 10 members that really tried to get a handle on this stuff. Glad to see you posting on the subject.
  18. Beautiful’Bird! Congrats. 😎
  19. DT code: Confusing and problematic. Gibson uses it inconsistently across different models - and not just "standard" models ("Dual pups figured Top", that DT was on a thinline model with dual pups and a figured top - not a standard model). Gibson does use T to indicate figured Top - I have a 359 with a figured top designated in the model number with a T (ES359TVSGH1). Also, DT = DoT (vs. block) markers (that is from Gibson C/S), and yet DT also shows up on models with markers that are not dots. The same confusion exists for DP - Dual Pickups and Dot Plain-top Some information about model numbers in the Gibson acoustic division - CH code: I also own several Gibson acoustics as well as Gibson electrics, and have seen many model numbers. CH is used on acoustics and it means Chrome Hardware. Similarly Gibson acoustics use GH and NH for Gold Hardware and Nickel Hardware. Note the hardware code is 2 letters in all cases. As for electrics, here's a Sweetwater listing page for a '61 SG Standard Vibrola which lists the model number/manufactures part number as SG61V00VENH1 where NH is the code for Nickel Hardware, NOT Nickel, Hardtail. As for a hardtail - here's a Sweetwater listing page for 61 SG Standard (hardtail) which lists the model number/manufactures part number as SG6100VENH1, ending the same way. Seems Gibson is again using NH for Nickel Hardware, NOT Nickel, Hardtail. For acoustics as well as electrics, this makes using C for Chrome and H for Hardtail obviously problematic, and I'm not sure it is correct. 1 code: In 1985 Gibson stopped labeling seconds, but many model numbers still end in 1. It appears that Gibson acoustic reassigned the number for the hand - 1=RH, 2=LH, and 3=RH with pick up, and 4=LH with pick up. Sometime after 2014 Gibson Acoustic began to drop the ending digit from model numbers and designate left handed guitars by ending the model# with "L". I don't know what Gibson electric division uses the 1 for, but it doesn't indicate the hand.
  20. Near perfect, yes. Perfect no. Reasons have already been covered. I agree with Bobouz - a variety of guitars is what I prefer. The differences are interesting and stimulating. While a single guitar might be perfect for a certain situation, it won’t be perfect for every situation.
  21. Sorry to hear that KB. Amazing that no one was killed.
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