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gtrman100

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Posts posted by gtrman100


  1. Since I sold my Gibson and Guild jazz boxes, I've been wanting another, but the prices are astronomical for a nice one. Just browsing, I walked into my local GC and hanging on the wall was this beautiful sunburst Epiphone with a blowout tag on it. After playing it for about 25 minutes, I dropped the $599 (!) and bought the guitar.

     

    The build quality, the materials, the playability, and tone are equal to the $2200 Guild X-500 I sold. Other than the poly finish, I think it's the equal to the Gibson ES-175's I've played. Epiphone has totally upped their game with these Pro models. The pickups sound excellent, no need to swap them, the fretwork is fine, the neck is straight, no finish flaws, the pots and switch are decent (maybe the only thing to change down the road) and it's got lots of bling with the multiply binding, gold hardware, Tree of Life headstock inlay, and well done sunburst finish. I'm totally satisfied with this axe and it's a keeper!

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  2. Very few guitars these days will be good out of the box. Manufacturers are not in the business of fret leveling and custom luthier work. Their business is banging out whole guitars. This is valid whether talking Gibson, Fender, or Epiphone, etc.

    Both my new Fender Strats, an American Std and Mexican Std needed fret leveling, truss rod & general setup. One needed nut filing as well.

    Both my new Epiphones, an ES 339 and 335 Dot required fret leveling, nut filing & setup before they would play properly.

    I had my buddy's Gibson Les Paul Classic setup by my tech and he had to build the nut up slightly as it had been cut too low from the factory!

    All of these guitars turned out to be exceptionally good players once properly attended to.

    It's a rare guitar that through good luck has parts that somehow mesh well together and allow the odd good one (that doesn't need a whole lot of tweaking) through, not too many of those though!

    There is a difference between a guitar needing some attention like fret leveling, truss rod adjustment and setup, and a guitar that is not able to play in tune. I have bought many guitars that needed some work; this is the first that had a manufacturing flaw this serious.

     

    BTW, thanks for the replies. The 2nd Nighthawk was returned, GC was very good about it. I bought a Danelectro 12-string with the money. It's a great guitar, forget about the price. I've had Rickenbacker 12-strings that didn't play as well. Also, it plays in tune!


  3. I just finished a saga, and because of the outcome I want to alert possible buyers. Guitarcenter.com has a deal for $329, so I pulled the trigger. I had a Gibson Nighthawk, sold it, but missed it.

     

    I had it shipped to my local GC store, it came in with a broken head stock. So I did the return and waited for the 2nd one. The second one arrived and looked in perfect shape.

     

    Here's where the problem arrived: I took the guitar home, changed the strings and checked intonation. It was off by a mile! Every string was almost a 1/4 tone sharp at the 12th fret. Adjusting the bridge saddles, a had to move them all the way back, but the low E and A strings still were pretty sharp. And, since the guitar is string through the body, the hole through the body is covered by the saddle!

     

    Obviously, the bridge was mounted too close to the nut; the scale length is off. There is no way to adjust the guitar unless the bridge is moved which would ruin the top of the guitar.

     

    So I took it back, sadder but wiser. If you buy an Epiphone Nighthawk, double check that the guitar can be intonated properly. The front edge of the bridge plate should be almost a 1/2 inch from the bridge pickup ring.


  4. Nice. How was your guitar on arrival? Did you have to take it in for a set up or was it playable out of the box? I had to take mine in to have the neck set and a couple of frets polished. After that a great playing guitar. 2014 Teaburst

    I picked up mine used, so it just needed the usual truss rod, bridge and pickup height adjustments. I did have a high fret, but I sanded it down a bit and now it's just fine. What do you mean "have the neck set"? Are you talking about the truss rod adjustment, or removing the neck? If it's the latter, I wouldn't spend that much on these guitars, they're not worth it.


  5. Regarding the Epi ES 335 Pro folks might be interested to know that Guitar Center has the Ebony and Natural finishes on sale at the moment for $349. After some calling around I was able to find one in Ebony yesterday. Even if you can't find one in stock at GC you may be able to get a price match from one of the other online retailers, such as Musicians Friend. [thumbup]

    If you have a hankerin' for a 335, I highly recommend the 335 Pro. It sounds as good or better than my Gibson Dot RI, and plays almost as well(I like the Gibson slim taper slightly better but it's not a big deal). If you can get over the fact that it has a poly finish instead of the luxurious Gibson nitro, there is no reason to pay all that $$$ for a Gibson.


  6. Yeah, the "Custom Shop" designation is pretty silly. I'm sure it's just another guitar on the assembly line. But other than the poly finish, the guitar is as well built as some of my high dollar Gibsons. The poly finish looks good, but not as rich looking(or smelling) as a lacquer one. I'm selling a Gibson 335 because the Epi will be just fine as a substitute.


  7. I saw a listing on CL, so I picked up this mint shape ES-335 Pro for a great deal-$320 with a gig bag. It plays great, sounds great and I'm impressed with workmanship. I have a G-400 Pro and love it also, so I knew what I was getting with the Pro series. It says Custom Shop on the back of the headstock, but it's just a production Epi, isn't it?

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  8. I recently got a G-400 Pro that had s bridge pickup that was microphonic. I too, thought it was because of inadequate potting, so I repotted it myself. No difference. I realized it was the pickup cover vibrating, not the windings of the pickup, so I put a strip of the poster putty underneath the cover between the pole pieces. Much reduced feedback- you might try it.

     

    Also because your guitar is semi-hollow, and a split pickup outputs more treble, that could be making the feedback worse.

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