Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Stan Ellison

Members
  • Content Count

    6
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Stan Ellison

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 03/29/1947

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Manchester UK
  1. The heel strap button is essential. I use the strap all the time, sitting or standing. If the strap ties to the head, the guitar ends up in the wrong position. For me.
  2. Keep on writing songs. Don't get too hung up on finishing one before starting another. The more you do the better you get at doing it, and you can always go back and redo earlier stuff. As has been said your clip sounds like it's in Dm. It works Ok as a tune. What does your book say about structure, the different parts of a song and how you put them together?
  3. I would like to hazard a guess that 99.9% of all songs ever written did not follow a formula or employ strategies found in a book. This is a guess, I'm not betting any money on it. If you write a song you can have any chords you like. You are writing it, if you like it then it's right. Other people may or may not agree but they didn't write it. You did. You do not need permission. You only need agreement if you want the song to be popular. The knowledge of theory will only explain what happened after the event. The event itself is an act of creativity. It didn't exist, you wrote it and now it does. Theory allows people to talk about it. Theory says that in the key of Dm the chord of A7 is chord five of that key, the dominant seventh. It is frequently used as a leading chord to the tonic (Dm) and A7 to Dm can be used to bring a tune to an end, a musical full stop. The chords F and C are also chords that can be used in the key of Dm. Dm is the relative minor to F major. These two keys use the same notes, starting in different places, and have the same key signature in music notation. The scale of F major naturally produces the following chords; F, Gm, Am, B flat, C, D minor and E diminished. E diminished has three of the four notes found in C7 and C7 is far more common. The key of D minor can use the same chords. There is no law that says you have to stick with these chords. These are just the chords you can build with the notes in the scale of F major or D minor. You can use any notes that you like. The use of A7 instead of Am is also common, It has the note C# instead of C natural and the movement of C# in the chord A7 to D in D minor helps create that musical 'full stop'.
  4. Me too with the always strapped, standing or sat. It only works if the playing position is high. Too low and the strap slides off when sitting. I like the high position, with the nut above the eye line you have a more relaxed fretting hand but you can only see the edge of the fretboard. Depending on where your picking hand crosses the body you can overcome an over heavy neck/head and the high neck angle improves balance.
  5. Interesting thread. It rescued me from almost an hours worth of TV. I was well into page two before I got that it was about Angie and not Anji. As a finger-style player the Davey Graham tune was what came to mind first. Incidentally even though it was played on the third fret and sounded like Cm most guitarists will think of it as being in Am because it uses Am 'shapes'. I actually tried playing it in Cm without a capo. It would be possible but I don't need that much work, or grief, right now. The first version of Anji I heard was by Bert Jansch, and I saw him playing it on video just last night. He said Davey Graham told him he played it too fast and with the wrong notes. I suspect more people have heard Jansch's and Paul Simon's versions more than the original. So much for the composer's intentions.
  6. Hello. I got my first Gibson in 1968 or 69. I don't know the model. It might have been an LG 2 or 3. Small body, cross braced, mahogany back and sides and spruce front. It had a narrow rectangular bridge and no varnish. Someone had sanded the front down 2 or 3 mill in places and I know now that it needed a neck reset. Years later I sold it and ended up with a Martin 00028. I sold that too later. I miss that Gibson more than the Martin. I now have two LG0s, both originally had plastic bridges. The first one had the bridge replaced with a rosewood bridge and the second one got a complete new spruce front. Thats the one I play most today. Also have a single pickup SG melody maker that had been converted to left hand and then back again. You might have guessed that I'm not all that bothered with original condition. I do like to play them. Cheers Stan.
×
×
  • Create New...