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jmendoza

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Everything posted by jmendoza

  1. That guitar looks similar to my 1989 Sherri but has some differences: The stop tailpiece looks to be after-market (not Gibson style) the Epiphone logo on the head stock is slightly tilted to the left, and the notch in the "open book" at the top of the peghead is wider than mine. Color is the same as mine and since the gold plating is in good condition, it must have very little play time, as it wears away quickly. I do not know where mine was made as it has no letters in the serial number, but does date to 1989, which was when it was purchased. I was given a set of Gibson PAF pick-ups from a 335, with wiring harness and installed them in the Sheraton, which made a huge improvement in its sound. . Jay
  2. I normally play my Regent un-plugged, but when using my Blues Jr, it had some odd behaviors: The volume pot seems to be the knob at the lower end of the pick guard, and the tone control is at the top, which seems backwards to me. In addition, the volume has less effect on the loudness than the tone does, which also seems backwards to me. I did confirm by removing the pick guard that the tone cap is on the top control pot, so it appears that is the way they came stock, or maybe mine was modified? I think it is stock but would like to confirm that. Does anyone here have a schematic of how they were wired? The tone I get is very nice but it takes a bit of fiddling around to get it as the controls don't seem to work like most other guitars and the range they work in is very narrow (linear instead of audio taper pots may be the problem, but I have not confirmed that). Any insight is appreciated. Jay
  3. Epi was renowned for archtops, but have quit making them. Any hope for them to resume manufacturing of these fine guitars? Jay
  4. The Archtop was one of Gibsons most famous designs, being pioneered by Orville himself, but now, sadly, Gibson no monger makes them. Is there any hope of them releasing an acoustic archtop again? Jay
  5. Thanks , I went there and found they have a Gotoh bridge that has 74mm stuc spacing, and my Sherri had 72mm spacing. May be abletomodify it ti fit
  6. Asian made guitars all have a tendency to do this because they are made from tropical woods in a relatively high humidity environment. Often, the problem is related to the wood not being aged/dried/kilned long enough. Or, it could have been properly dried but then sat out and absorbed humidity before it was assembled. If you live in an are of low relative humidity, then it only will make the problem of the wood shrinking and cracking worse. One thing I do is to use fingerboard oil on my Asian guitars fret boards as it seals the wood and helps it not shrink/dry out and crack.
  7. That looks just like my 1989 Sheraton. Theses older ones have the nibs over the ends of the frets and in general, they have more colors that reflect in the pearl and abalone inlays, so they were higher quality than later ones in that respect. But, they did not have made in USA pick-ups, which is their weak point. I had to replace mine with genuine Gibson Humbuckers and that transformed into a great guitar because now, it sounds as good as it plays. If someone has already changed out the pick-ups in it, then it would be worth the asking price because these early Sheratons have tiny F-holes which make it very difficult to change our the pots, caps, switch, jack, wiring and put in new pick-ups...it took me several hours and a lot of choice words to do mine! Jay
  8. I have a 1989 MIK Sheraton that has all the gold plating gone on the bridge and stop tail piece. The previous owner kept it by his front sliding glass door at the beach which was always open, so all the hardware is very corroded. The bridge saddles are rusted solid and cannot be adjusted. This guitar appears to have a much wider bridge that has different stud diameters than later Epiphone electric guitars and the newer Sheratons. I need to know what to get to replace this older bridge..is there a retro-fit replacement available? Will a new stop tail piece fit where the old one went? I would also like to replace the bridge, tailpiece and tuners with regular chromed ones as the gold plating is gone, and was so thin it wears away easily. I replaced the pickups with PAFs and it sounds great, but the tuners, bridge , and tailpiece need replacement. I want to use chrome this time as the original Epiphone gold plating was very thin and did not last. If anyone here who has replaced the bridge and tailpiece on one of these early Korean Sheratons, could you tell me what I need as far as the correct parts and where to get them. Thanks, Jay
  9. I need to replace the pots and caps on an 05 LPS VOS model that has that fake aging on it too. One tone pot, p;us the other volume pots are very noisy, and the neck tone pot died. Wanted to know the brand of pots Gibson uses(CTS, Bourns..?) and the original factory values used for the neck and bridge tone caps. The pots and caps look to nave been changed out on this guitar, and so I'm not sure if they are factory; the workmanship is horrible and lots of melted insulation. Very poor soldering, kinked leads, and damaged lugs on the pots. I plane to do a complete re-wire including a new switchcfraft jack. Any help on getting the correct parts to keep this guitar original is a appreciated, Jay
  10. Ok, this thread is really old! But I have a little to add: The average current Gibson compares much more favorably to the ones produced by Norlin, although occasionally Norlin screwed up and made an exceptional guitar. The 1950s Gibsons I have are all exceptional, and have steadily improved over the 30 some years I have owned them. The Norlin era guitars from Gibson are not as good on an average, the quality varies quite a bit between each guitar, even of the same exact model. So you can find a great Norlin or a dud Norlin, and there seems to have been an increase in the duds and "2nds" sold during the Norlin years. The newer Gibsons tend to be a bit chunkier, heavier finishes, and some have finish problems due to the formulation of Nitro-cellulose lacquer being changed to meet EPA regulations. In addition, lets face it, there is less high quality wood out there that has been aged to perfection, and a lot more people buying electric guitars since the 1950s. Demand has gone up and depleted the reserves of the highest quality woods. This means the woods you get today are not what they used to be compared to back when good wood was easily available. Today there are huge restrictions on the kind of woods that can be imported to the USA, and some woods are no longer available (Philippine mahogany), or cannot be imported as they are "protected endangered species" for which you can thank all the burnt out hippies who now have become politicians and activists. Gibson has over the past 20 years has done quite a bit to undue the changes made by Norlin to the humbucker pickups and re-establish their good reputation. The acoustic guitars no longer have as many hand operations, especially the planning, and carving of the tops and tap tuning. Today,they select an average optimum thickness for the tops and they all get made the same way on automated routing and planning machines. This has been true since the late 1950s. In addition, many other labor intensive steps have been eliminated, like the binding nibs on the neck binding. Instead of the use of hide glue for all glue joints, cyanoacrylate and aliphatic resin(Tite-Bond)glues are substituted and are either more brittle or rubbery, and very difficult to re-pair should the glue fail. So, although each of these issue is small by itself, the cumulative effect is drastic, especially when you compare todays instruments to the ones that are pre-Norlin. So todays Gibsons are more consistant than the Norlin years, but the oldies are hard to beat and are only getting better. The age of a good oldie gives it the edge on any newly made guitar.
  11. Ok, this thread is really old! But I have a little to add: The average current Gibson compares much more favorably to the ones produced by Norlin, although occasionally Norlin screwed up and made an exceptional guitar. The 1950s Gibsons I have are all exceptional, and have steadily improved over the 30 some years I have owned them. The Norlin era guitars from Gibson are not as good on an average, the quality varies quite a bit between each guitar, even of the same exact model. So you can find a great Norlin or a dud Norlin, and there seems to have been an increase in the duds and "2nds" sold during the Norlin years. The newer Gibsons tend to be a bit chunkier, heavier finishes, and some have finish problems due to the formulation of Nitro-cellulose lacquer being changed to meet EPA regulations. In addition, lets face it, there is less high quality wood out there that has been aged to perfection, and a lot more people buying electric guitars since the 1950s. Demand has gone up and depleted the reserves of the highest quality woods. This means the woods you get today are not what they used to be compared to back when good wood was easily available. Today there are huge restrictions on the kind of woods that can be imported to the USA, and some woods are no longer available (Philippine mahogany), or cannot be imported as they are "protected endangered species" for which you can thank all the burnt out hippies who now have become politicians and activists. Gibson has over the past 20 years has done quite a bit to undue the changes done by Norlin to the humbucker pickups and re-establish their good reputation. The acoustic guitars no longer have as many hand operations, especially the planning, and carving of the tops and tap tuning. Today,they select an average optimum thickness for the tops and they all get made the same way on automated routing and planning machines. This has been true since the late 1950s. In addition, many other labor intensive steps have been eliminated, like the binding nibs on the neck binding, the use of hide glue for all glue joints, cyanoacrylate and aliphatic resin(Tite-Bond)glues are substituted and are either more brittle or rubbery, and very difficult to re-pair should the glue fail. So, although each of these issue is small by itself, the cumulative effect is drastic, especially when you compare todays instruments to the ones that are pre-Norlin. So todays Gibsons are more consistant than the Norlin years, but the oldies are hard to beat and are only getting better. The age of a good oldie gives it the edge on any newly made guitar.
  12. Old guitar finishes don't look anything like what they do to a VOS. Guitars get dings, scratches, but not dull all over, as the wear areas tend to stay shiny. The artificially aged look may appeal to posers, but it's quite pretentious compared to an actual vintage instrument. Satin finishes have their place, but my preference is for gloss because it enhances the depth and beauty of the figuring in the wood. The dulled finishes detract from the depth and make it one dimensional, less character. The other thing is a dull or satin finish can have some pretty bad flaws, and not be very level, but they will not show up. By contrast, it takes much more careful preparation and sanding to get a dead level gloss finish, because the high gloss shows every little imperfection. So, in my opinion, the VOS guitars, or ones with satin finishes are a perfect way to cycle through instruments that had a problem in the painting process. That means the guitars with finish problems get earmarked for a satin, or aged finish, rather than the expensive process of repairing and touching up a finish flaw. In the old days, guitars with unattractive wood grain, or a finish problem would often get a second coat of a solid color to cover the problem up. Now, voila, it's a VOS, or whatever!
  13. How do you like your your Epi Swingster? I wanted to poll Swingsters owner and ask for their critique and impressions, pros, cons, likes, disslikes. Has anyone tried different PUs, and if so, how did that work out. I was interested in a a Swingster because it has a Bigsby and wanted an alternative to a Strat for doing surf style and rock where you need a tremolo. TIA for your replies. Jay
  14. What's on your mind?

  15. 1954 Gibson L-50

    1939 Martin 00-15

    1902 Martin Soprano Uke

    1988 Gibson ES-175

    1989 Epi Sheraton

    1970 Yamaha FG 300

    1985 Warmouth 57 Strat w/ Wilkinson Covertible trem

    2005 Epi Emperor Regent

    1953 Kay Archtop

    1960 Sivertone (Kay) Archtop

    1975 Takamine D-28

    1922 Maybelle Banjo Uke

  16. My MIK 1989 Sheraton has small F holes, you have to use mini pots as full size ones won't fit, but they sound good, so it's not an issue. I replaced the terrible sounding pickups with PAFs, huge improvement. Action and finish on mine is excellent, great playing guitar. I just wish I had upgraded the pickups 27 years ago! The overall build quality, and wood quality is much nicer on the older made in Korea Sheratons. I have heard that some have rubbery necks, but hey, this can be true of most any mass produced guitar, regardless of where it was made. One thing I noticed is that the older MIK Sheratons tend to got for about $50 to $100 more than the newer ones, depending on their condition.
  17. This is a storage/age related issue. I restore many things, and we have similar issues with old radios. The longer the item sits, sealed up, the worse the damage will be. Humidity and heat also agravate the situation. As others have mentioned, air them out from time to time. I would remove the pick guard, and either order a new L5 one from All Parts, or buy the matching material from Stew-Mac and make new ones. Take the hardware off and get it re-plated, but have them put it on a bit thicker than the original flash plating. Let the cases air out for a month, and keep the guitars on stands so they air out too. Be sure to take them out at least once a month and play them. Oh, and change the strings.
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