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Leonard McCoy

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Everything posted by Leonard McCoy

  1. With Gibson guitars, the truss rod nut is often enveloped in lacquer or the truss rod cavity, while not too small itself, has a thick coat of lacquer so that you often need, for the first few times anyways, to use a little force to get the truss rod socket properly connected onto the nut. Your guitar should have come with the right truss rod wrench. If in doubt, buy a new one, or the multitool, directly from Gibson.
  2. Glad to hear you're fine. I wouldn't want to leave those guitars alone either...
  3. No luthier with any credibility would replace the entire fretboard of a vintage J-45. It's just not the right or proper thing to do for just getting rid of those divots in the fretboard that look deeper or worse than they really are. The area between the frets can be scraped down with a sharp razor blade and any remaining grooves can be filled with rosewood dust and super glue to a perfect level and shine again. If a refret is in order anyway, some luthiers might consider to plane down the entire fretboard some but even that would be considered a more extreme measure given the vintage.
  4. The sticker didn't do anything to the finish (no chemical reaction). It's just that the finish underneath it wasn't exposed to sunlight (until you peeled it off), while the rest of the guitar was. In other terms the finish "aged" everywhere but where it wasn't exposed to sunlight, that is, where the sticker was located at. The finish underneath the sticker is how the finish color looked originally.
  5. I would get the original case repaired even if you're not using it. It'll add to the value of the guitar in the short and long run.
  6. I don't even believe that guitar was purchased by OP in the first place...
  7. Just buy another Sonex fallen into disrepair and use its neck.
  8. Got pictures? I don't believe first-time, never-to-return posters (or anyone for that matter).
  9. In most cases there is no reason to worry. Jedzep is of course right in saying that if the saddle has too much room to wiggle around in that it could act as a wedge and eventually split the bridge in half over an extended perioud of time, but I doubt that is the case here. With an undersaddle pickup installed, the saddle usually sits more loosely in the bridge slot than normally as per recommendation of the pickup manufacturer (I suppose they want to achieve perfect saddle-to-pickup-strip coverage). It is also not often the case that a brand-new guitar comes from the guitar manufacturer with a perfectly snugly sitting saddle that doesn't drop out when flipping the guitar—at least not in my experience. I don't think any action is required. Play and enjoy your fabulous J-15 and please do post pictures.
  10. Shifts in temperature or humidity cause the top to move, hence there will be times when cracks are more prevalent and open. The crack doesn't appear to go very deep into the top wood, as if a solid object cut the top ripping it at an angle or something. It is difficult to tell what the appropriate fix is without hands-on review of the trauma. A competent luthier is recommended for way too many reasons to elaborate on here.
  11. The second Hummingbird sounds phenomenal (perhaps a saddle conversion or an entirely different one). There is much style but little substance as usual to the song, though.
  12. He's just playing along the record and we're not actually hearing the Hummingbird?
  13. That figuring in the top wood, perfectly evenly spread out, is a sight to behold. And the classic blue Epiphone label brings back memories. That's one hell of a review, thanks.
  14. Les Paul Standard with an asymmetrical neck and an American Fender Stratocaster. I'd love to get my hands on an ES, though, these days.
  15. Given the same scale length, tuning and string properties, the tension of the new Gibson strings would be comparable to, if not the same as, their D'Addario counterpart. You can use their calculator here for whatever scientific project you are tackling. Personally, I don't see the use.
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