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stevendv

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  1. I suspect our readings of Animal Farm might differ, too, and that's just fine. No comment on the hens.... I foolishly took the bait, I admit it, but if you look at the first comments that yanked this thread out of its original path it was the same old comments that are made every time Springsteen is mentioned in any thread in any context. I should have just let them go, I know that.
  2. Writes the guy whose broad-minded light-hearted contribution to the discussion was that musicians should just "SHUT UP AND SING"... It's also "just life" that some musicians and other entertainers talk about politics, or even sing about them. While some just sing about themes that grate on some people as being from an "implicitly political" angle. I don't see that anyone commenting on this thread from any perspective has been "running and hiding" or finds it impossible to imagine that not everyone agrees with them. Just the opposite, I'd say. Given the the fact this thread started out being about a double pick guard J-200 one might wonder why anyone felt compelled at any point to say anything at all about whether or not they listen to Springsteen, as that wasn't even vaguely related to the original post. (It's a little like someone declaring during a conversation about a recent Yankees or Manchester United game that "I haven't followed that team since Dererk Jeter or Cristiano Ronaldo left." Okay, and your point is..? It obviously has nothing to do with the game--no more than the comments about not listening to Springsteen have to do with the original subject of this post.) But, hell, now the forum is fillin' up with "pigs" and "hens" and others of below "average intelligence": commenters who have "earned" these labels by not writing about what they should in the way they should, according to those folks labeling them as such. Irony really is absent from this forum, ain't it?
  3. Okay, to return closer to the original post: double pick guards: some people love the way they look, some hate it; some think they ruin tone/sound, some don't worry about it (or at least not apart from each specific guitar). But aside from lefties (guitarists, not political parties) who in a world of so many guitars for right-handers might be happy to see an easy conversion come their way, does anyone actually find the double pick guard useful? Do you have a double pick guard guitar that's been protected from marks you make on your other guitars? Or do you have a guitar that you wish would have had un upper pick guard on it because of the way you (or its previous owner) played it? I can imagine they might be useful, but really have no idea from personal experience, so I'm wondering if some people out there do.
  4. Honestly, I wasn't thinking specifically of your post when I wrote that part, though because I started off quoting your post I'd see how you'd think that. I'm sorry about that. The acid reflux was more generally about the comments sections of, say Youtube, and newspapers, where people just let 'em rip (even if the connection to the subject is tenuous). Didn't actually see much bile in your comment, and the only question I'd have had about it specifically was when did Babs, the cast of Hamilton and Pence start playing Gibsons? If that were true, whatever else one might say about them at least they have good taste in guitars. I agree with your main point, JC. I've watched the video in which Yusef said those things and have never been able to decide exactly one way or the other, though I'm also certain that your description of what the British press did with it is accurate. Given the high tension at that moment and the fact that a death sentence had been put upon Rushdie, to "joke" in the way Yusef claims he was joking (though it didn't look like "dry British humor" to me) is tone deaf, at the very least. So I can understand why Rushdie would still hold it against him, as what I've read of Yusef's "apologies" or accounts of the incident tend suggest that he, Yusef, was the victim of the incident. I don't know. In any case, I certainly know I agree with your main points. I agree with this, and have thought this even more since I've learned to play and sing (badly and very badly, respectively) some of his songs. They're great. The only issue I've ever had with Bruce is just a matter of personal musical taste: to me, most of his stuff seems overproduced; the material is strong enough, and his own talent, that sometimes the production strikes me as overkill. So I'm one of those people whose favorite album of his is Nebraska. But that kind of opinion says nothing about the artist, and everything about what appeals to the particular listener (though we sometimes like to act as though it's all the artist's fault). For this reason I'll often enough like covers of Springsteen's songs a bit more than the album versions of them--which means I should listen to yours! You seem to be one of those extraordinarily literal readers of which certain countries seem to produce so many, but I can assure you I didn't believe you were *actually* proposing a law to that effect (although in certain US state legislatures I'm sure a "Shut Up And Sing" bill would go pretty far, and even national politicians have suggested laws that would curtail free speech). But as you live in America (which I didn't know before you told me, as there are people from around the world on this blog, and I'm an American with dual-citizenship living in Europe), then I'm sure we're in agreement on issues of free speech, which is not just an American ideal (it pre-dates America) but a fundamental principle of democracies in all parts of the world. I find it ironic that you believed *your* rights to free speech to be threatened by my mere disagreement with your original "SHUT UP AND SING" post--even as you suggested an opinion that artists (or *certain* ones, as dhanners points out) should keep their mouths shut when not performing. But it's the kind of irony that's lost on literal readers. (Who seem inevitably to read almost everything as another instance of themselves being victimized.)
  5. Luckily for you there are some countries in the world where this "policy" of yours is actually law--and there's generally no line for citizenship to them if you'd like to apply. Unluckily for the rest of us, a dismaying number of Western politicians are starting to express admiration for such blatantly authoritarian, anti-democracy regimes. All of us have very selective memories about what we consider offensive statements by performers. As a lurker here for years I've noticed that a mention of someone like Springsteen is sure to evoke indignant responses from a predictable group of commenters, whereas nothing is ever said when someone gushes about the talent or music of Cat Stevens, though the latter is actually on record as supporting the death of a writer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_Stevens'_comments_about_Salman_Rushdie. I don't mention this in an attempt to stir up anti-Muslim sentiment, or outrage Cat Stevens/Yusef Islam/Yusef fans, but simply because I think it's been shown to be rather dangerous to try to define what is "appropriate" for an artist to express, regardless of whatever the ideology motivating it may be. Too many artists have actually been killed for saying what they think, in their work or outside it--but maybe this is on my mind as I just interviewed the daughter of one last week, Ken Saro-Wiwa, who was executed with 8 others after a sham trial by a right-wing military government working closely with Shell oil. His murder was no less appalling because it was committed on behalf of corporate/capitalistic interests than if it had been done for the sake of religious or communist ones. Of course no one is calling for the official "silencing" of anyone in this forum, I just find it interesting to see the indignation that inevitably flares up at the slightest mention of certain performers but not others. But I guess that's what social media is largely for: indignation--coming up irresistibly, like acid reflux belches. Though in this case, I'm not sure why it wasn't just focused on those double pick guards and how they MAY--or may NOT--be ruining that beautiful guitar's tone!
  6. Totally agree with your description of the guitar, I've had one since last spring--which means that I also have some serious pick guard placement envy. And if you like its sound now, of course just wait till you play it more; it just keeps getting better. Also agree that the case is perfect for it: solidly made and worth getting instead of some other option. Congrats.
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