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tw2_usa

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About tw2_usa

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  1. It's true, it's a bit hard to believe the tone, but you gotta try it... The other thing is there is no top bracing, so the sound bounces around differently. It's worth trying one out just to hear the different bounce patterns of the sound, there really is something subtly different...
  2. I'd love your opinion, considering the stable you're already running. I was digging into the one I was playing - it had Elixir nano 11's and it felt like I could have been punching into an SJ with mediums on her and no distortion or buzz, just clean musical response. I have not played a neck besides the 42 Legend that let me do so much right with so little error as I did with this N2 neck. This is critical because I mainly play to accompany myself singing and prefer not to have to babysit the guitar while playing and instead focus on the vocals and performance.
  3. Wish list, unfortunately. I tried Rainsongs in the past but this new hybrid material is really something. I think also I'm heading into a new line of work that will put a lot of travel into the equation of my life and I know I will want to bring a guitar. With airlines and flying what they are nowadays, being completely free of the worries of a wood instrument, especially when this Rainsong does so many things so well, is very attractive... Plus, look at the expense and agony that guys put themselves through trying to amplify a good wooden guitar. It seems an endless trial and error process with maybe all of two percent of the acoustic guitar playing world happy with the results they get. The Rainsong's got a Fishman Plus T installed so you can dial in the amplification and guess what, it sounds like a wooden guitar amplified. For me, I already have a natural wood guitar for special, intimate moments with an inanimate object. But for a worry-free guitar that has playability in spades, cuts through in an acoustic environment, can plug and play, nearly damage-resistant for gigging... I'm saying the future is now.
  4. I’d have to describe this guitar as my new favorite. Because it is surprisingly so Gibsonesque to me. You can dig into this guitar like the SJ-200 and it hands you back tone and crisp sharp rhythm in response. And volume! Or you can blues it up with a slide L style but most of all, it’s the neck, the J-45 Legend baseball bat neck. The Rainsong N2 neck is as close to the perfection of the Gibson1942 Legend neck I’ve found. The new hybrid carbon/glass material woodies up the sound well enough. And the 1.75 nut feels maybe a slice narrower, closer to the Gibson standard. This is one playable acoustic. The sample I enjoyed was a H-WS1000N2. If felt in many ways like my dream Gibson, strangely enough... Anyone play one?
  5. I've edited your quote but appreciate the whole thing. My problem is I'm a tequila soaked blues guy who prefers playing rhythm to lead. So do I get the Hog for the voice or the Maple for the crisp percussion? It's an endless quandary. To answer the poster's question though, I find whenever I stop into a Best Buy (a big box retailer that started selling instruments these last couple years), the only Gibson they tend to have is a Hummingbird and it always tends not to excite, so Best Buy Hummingbirds would be my answer. Knowing also that the Hummingbird was produced to compete with Martins, I always hear a bit of Martin when I play a 'Bird, and when I play a Gibson I want to hear a Gibson. Logically, hanging $3000 guitars on the wall of a store like Best Buy, if I were Gibson, I wouldn't want to send them any cherries (imho)... those stores aren't even designed for musicians.
  6. My experience in demoing TV vs. non-TV versions of Gibson acoustics has produced the following conclusion: The TV's are built lighter (the original 08s lightest of all, getting heavier as the TV line continues). This produces a more responsive instrument. It also makes it a more vulnerable instrument. With Gibson's lifetime warranty, that's a risk for them. They would rather build the guitars a bit heavier and sacrifice a bit of tone for longevity and less demands on their warranty, the result of which is more their standard line imho. It will always boil down to the actual instrument itself. I've played standards that were definitely "a cut above" and a couple TV's that were significantly unbalanced and tinny. Best to take your time and try as many as you can - make sure to let someone else play it (a friend, a salesperson) and stand back and LISTEN. That will serve you if tone is the most deciding factor for you. If playability is the deciding factor, then of course the subtle differences in tone between the two models wont matter as much, just find the one that feels like an extension of your own body and fingers for playing. Good luck.
  7. Hi Bob, can I ask please for you to elaborate on the special labels? Does it say "VOS" on an orange label? Very curious if you know. Thanks.
  8. Aw shoot, I just ordered the Intelli IMT500 which has the low E problems but seemed good otherwise. May have to exchange if the low E is as difficult as some buyers commented...
  9. It's dangerous to compare one's own voice to others. I went to Sting's Symphonicity tour this summer and he played a new song. My wife found it on Youtube bootlegged and posted by a concert attendee and you can hear the song and also the people close to the video camera speaking... Well, the voices that are speaking mere inches from the camera mic sound thin, tight, but in the bg you hear Sting thru the sound system and also through whatever assortment of filters, preamps, tubes, etc. etc. Sting's voice sounds rich, lush, full, resonant, in comparison. These voices we know and love from listening to recorded music have so much more support than the voices we hear of our own when we sing to/for ourselves. But to answer the question, for me it would have to be Frank Sinatra.
  10. Raising four sons these past 11 years - everything in the house, the yard, the garage, is broken. And I mean everything. So my guitar stays in its case ALL the time. It's been strangely liberating however, albeit annoying - I no longer value Things as I used to, and it makes my life more authentic it seems... Thanks for this post though, being that I live in Calif. nearish the ocean, I'm probably ok hanging my git on the wall, out of reach of the toddlers. Funny, I don't mind if the body gets dinged a bit, don't mind at all, but dings on the neck tend to freak me out. My initial metal capo did all kind of skid marks on the neck. I hate them. I now use only the elastic band capo which does not do this and also maintains better tuning I've found.
  11. Nut width is master, it's true. I love my Martin, the only acoustic I own, but the neck is just a bit too narrow. My hand tiring is not a problem, but I've played enough Gibson's at shops now to know that I need a wider nut width, but 1.75 is too wide. The modern standard Gibson nut width (+/- 1.72) is perfect for me. The good part is being able to recognize the problem. I had grown so frustrated making the same errors on my Martin, errors that simply don't happen when playing a Gibson. At least I know that I don't have to put extra time into my technique, since it's a size issue, not a technique issue. I also am 6'3"... Not only guitars, but dozens of amazing automobiles I will never own due to sizing. I say bite the bullet and let her go since, in my experience, this 'problem' does not go away, and ultimately the frustration of poor nut width size trumps all.
  12. I started this thread over a year ago. I'm now a good part of the way into my third year of playing. I read online when I first asked this question that it takes about three years to get good. I feel for the first time I am getting good. When I first posted, much of this response was about defining 'good'. Good for me is when I want to express myself musically through the guitar or voice or both together, I play well enough for that to happen. Am beginning to do so consistently. I feel so lucky and grateful to be able to play an instrument, especially a steel string dread. Played a Hummingbird Pro at GC today. Beauty.
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