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Dub-T-123

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Posts posted by Dub-T-123


  1. Man that thing is cool. The way the light interacts with the clear coat and blue to make the green color is so much more interesting than any pristine refinish job IMO. Looks very dynamic in the sunlight

     

    I really really suggest that if you are obsessed with having a mint condition MVX, sell this and buy one in the condition you want. Refinishing will only mean there is one less original MVX out there for the rest of the world. 
     

    don’t refinish! I repeat, don’t refinish!


  2. That is strange and I really don’t have an answer. 
     

    What I do know is that of the finishes I have experience with, nitro dries the fastest by far. I am aware of plasticizers etc but this does not sound characteristic of nitrocellulose lacquer to me..

     

    If the lacquer has that much solvent present you certainly would not expect the finish to be hard enough to contact a surface such as the plush lining of a case without serious damage

     

    Regarding the vanilla smell, someone very experienced in the finishing industry could tell you the exact name of the product. At work (custom cabinets) we occasionally use one finisher only for the absolute finest work. His work smells exactly like a new Gibson guitar when he’s done. 
     

    I could imagine Gibson adding a vanilla scent as well. I think at least originally, that smell is from a buffing compound or some other finishing product. It is not from the lacquer itself as far as I’m aware. 
     

     

    I would first suggest throwing more chemicals at it. Wipe the whole guitar down thoroughly with naphtha to clean any potential residue off any part of the guitar. Naphtha is safe for nitro, as well as the fretboard and plastics of your guitar but acts as a degreaser. Afterwards you’d probably want to oil the fretboard and polish the guitar using products that you consider to smell good


  3. Are you asking about a custom built “made to measure” guitar or something that has already been built? 
     

    The Dove seems to go for a bit over $4K at Sweetwater. Made to measure would probably be a couple grand more but to get a real idea you’d have to contact Gibson for a quote


  4. I love Kenny’s Sound 😛

     

    Roadsong2 how do you know Kenny? Are you one of his students?

     

    In this thread I’ve noticed everyone is pouring over his guitar choice but I’m not seeing a lot of talk about his amp. 
     

    I have read before (long time ago so who knows how accurately I’m remembering) that Kenny pretty much exclusively used a 1960 Fender 5e3.

     

    Frankly I think whether you are using a Les Paul or an L5 won’t make as big of a difference as long as you are using the right amp at appropriate settings. The 5e3 is a unique sounding amp and is very very important in this equation


    Do not try to get the correct sound out of the Edge signature 5e3 “reissue” or anything like that. They use a 12AX7 for V1 and do not sound right. I’m not sure if a simple tube swap would fix it or if they messed with more aspects of the amp but it doesn’t sound good to me. 
     

    there are loads of 5e3 options out there that will be better than a current offering from fender


  5. Around this point I was in the zone and things were going great and fast so I wasn’t really stopping for a lot of pictures. 
     

    I put the template on the front of the neck and went to route the neck to shape. The first side goes great and I’m really getting excited at what I’m seeing. I flip everything around to route the other side and disaster strikes.. 

     

    The template slips while I’m cutting and I accidentally cut a crappy wavy line about 1/4” into the side of the neck at the worst part. I almost chucked the neck blank across the room at this point but decided it was worth fixing. 
     

    Removing as little material as possible, I make another cut to straighten up the side of the neck with the mistake. Then, using wood cut from the neck blank in the same part of the neck, I glue a “wing” on giving me enough material to make the proper neck shape again. 
     

    Since I used the wood from the same part of the same piece to make the repair and made a really tight joint, I don’t think the repair will be visible at all when all is said and done. When I look at it in person I can see that the grain blends together perfectly. 
     

    but that was a learning experience.. 

     

    Ksd2V8K.jpg

    JNwixUu.jpg
     

    Next Saturday is gonna be all work on the neck. We’ll see if I get to the point where I’m ready to glue it in. I definitely want to drill the hole for the pickup wire before gluing the neck in just in case I need to go through the pocket

    • Like 1

  6. Next I cut the angle on the neck blank which will be the face of the headstock. First I cut it to the pencil line on the bandsaw, then hand sanded it flat. I made sure to keep checking how square it was coming out and it’s very perfect. 
     

    Then I cut out the whole side profile of the neck on the bandsaw, leveled up the back of the heel and headstock with sanding block, and cut out the front profile on the bandsaw

    KkN6f3m.jpg


  7. 36 minutes ago, Rabs said:

    I dont think theres an issue saying it just makes it easier  🙂  Doing the jobs properly requires the right tools (you know that I am sure) to get all those little bits and bobs you need its much easier and as you say cheaper unless you have some kind of production line going on.

    You will need some kind of soft faced or brass hammer or something to bash the frets in. Basically any hammer softer than the frets.

    Ohh look, stewmac to a brass/plastic one

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/StewMac-Fretting-Hammer-Hammer-with-plastic-and-brass-faces/253234239882?hash=item3af5efd98a:g:UooAAOSws6ZZ920y

    You can buy them way cheaper though

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Guitar-or-String-instruments-Luthier-Tool-Fret-Hammer-Dual-Head-Nylon-Rubber-9/224174069401?hash=item3431d0d699:g:eycAAOSwjJpfckUv


    No issue with it being easier, but my preference would be to do it myself

     

    I have the ebay mallet. I like the stewmac tools that I have but the prices on some of their things are stupid. Like a $5 mono jack or $5 Chinese plastic knob. An expensive hammer is something I understand as quality hand tools are not usually the cheapest. Some of their stuff is just the same brand you can get other places for twice the price


  8. All off the mahogany (or maybe utile as Rabs said) at our shop is flatsawn and I wanted to use quartersawn for the neck. I took a piece of flatsawn and cut two smaller pieces out where the grain was in a quartersawn pattern.

     

    I’m sure the seam wouldn’t be too visible but I thought it’d look cheap to have the two piece neck. Instead I laminated a  ~1/16” piece of walnut in the center so it looks like I did it all on purpose. I think the little pinstripe running down the center of the neck should look cool. 
     

    Planing a piece of walnut to 1/16” was its own little challenge without a drum sander 🙂 

     

    So in this pic you will see I didn’t really care much about the pieces being flush because it is all oversized and needs to be properly squared up anyway. But that joint is super tight and it should look great when the neck is shaped and hopefully be nice and stable

     

    ZokW5ZK.jpg


  9. Still gonna do all the inlays, fretting, etc myself so it’s still a good challenge. 
     

    Ok so I got some work done but forgot a sheet of measurements for the cavity depths etc so I didn’t wanna screw that up. Might do that tomorrow or Monday and maybe the roundover after. Here come some pics..

     

    Here is my ‘hog after the first pass through the planer. Wooooo

    xlJ3jWL.jpg


     

    Not sure if I’ve got enough glue there?

    0a2AiqY.jpg


  10. Tomorrow will be day 1 of the first build. I’ve been telling one of my coworkers about my plans and he wants to build one now too so he’s going to start his build tomorrow with me. He doesn’t play guitar but he has some cool ideas.
     

    I’m really looking forward to tomorrow. I don’t have my trussrod or fretboard yet so I dunno how far I’ll get tomorrow but I’ll order some stuff I need from stewmac tonight. 
     

    my goal is to have a LP Jr double cut   body mostly complete tomorrow and a neck blank ready to route the truss rod channel. 
     

    I have a lot of mahogany available at the shop but depending on what I can find I am curious about doing a 5 piece neck similar to what you’d see on a Norlin 335

     

    Just had to share my excitement a bit here.. I will post pics tomorrow!


  11. As others have said these pickups are really new so not many of us here have much experience with them. That said, I see no reason to swap them preemptively. The stock pickups seem interesting 
     

    As for a PAF style recommendation, for me at this point it is definitely the Gibson “custombucker” that I have in my new Les Paul. Best sounding pickups I’ve personally used. They are just a little “sweeter” sounding than other humbuckers I’ve used. Don’t know how to define that better.. Less muddy but not shrill?

     

    Make sure to take the guitar to a respectable tech if you do any electronics work. It will have to be fished through the F hole and the guy at GC is not going to be trustworthy for that job

    • Like 1

  12. If you google alpine white burst it pops right up with a model called the “Signature T”

     

    It seems likely that this would be the model in question rather than a Standard. Looks like it has the features of a normal “Standard” anyway so the seller is probably confused.

     

    Whether you like the trade or not is up to you. From what I can tell this trade values the Marshall around $300 which seems low considering the original price of about $1,500

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