Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

TMC55

All Access
  • Content Count

    14
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2 Neutral

About TMC55

  • Rank
    Member
  1. I've posted about this guitar before. It was built in the Gibson custom shop upstairs in Bozeman for the 1998 NAMM show. Each of the five luthiers who built it, Mike Bakeburg, Val Bolitho, Ren Ferguson, Kevin Kopp and Phil Sgamma, signed the guitar on the underside of the top. Ebony fretboard, Indian rosewood body, Spruce top. It's a beautiful instrument. I'm ready to pass it on. Check it out if you are interested. Price is definitely negotiable: https://rvrb.io/1998-master-built-ilbkqs
  2. Hi I'm thinking this guitar is NOT a LP Custom as the listing and truss rod cover claim. Cuz the serial number doesn't begin with CS. Could be wrong. What do you think? https://www.shopgoodwill.com/Item/66055781
  3. I've seen that one. What I haven't seen before and what I can't find info on the web about is a model with only one control knob -- no tone knob.
  4. No photo. If/when I go back to the shop, I'll take one.
  5. Hello All Ran across a Gibson semi-hollowbody today in a pawn shop that I did not recognize. It's a late model, looked to be a 335 style body, CS serial number. It had one humbucker. The thing that threw me, and that I can't find so far on the internet, is it had a single volume knob and NO tone knob. So a single knob Gibson electric semi-hollow? What is she?
  6. For sale at an auction in Pennsylvania. The body, of course, resembles an SG. But I've never seen these pickups or controls. And the headstock and logo look unusual. Maybe an early model SG I've never seen before. Whadya think? LINk to GUITAR Listing: https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/64950897_red-gibson-electric-guitar
  7. I posted this originally in the wrong forum, couldn't figure out how to delete it, so forgive me if you've already seen this, but... When I was 15, my Dad and I went in on a Gibson SG. That meant it was my guitar, he just ponied up half the money. I think we paid $225 for it. Or maybe that was my half. Either way, this was in the late 70s, and it was a 1972 SG. I was learning to play guitar at the time, and that was my one and only electric ride for the next decade, through a couple or three bands, many hours alone, in the practice rooms, and on stage. Fast forward to the early 1990s, and I had long given up pursuing the Rock Star dream and only played once in a while. But a son was on the way, and his mom and I were in that phase where you try and figure out a good name for the baby. Discussions, notes, baby name books, etc. She was probably 7 months pregnant and driving one day when she saw a road sign pointing the way to a town called Fenton. "Hmm," she thought to herself. "That's a good boy's name." Then a bell went off. "Wait, Mark (that's me) has a Fenton guitar." "Oh, no," she mused, "I think it's called a Fender." (I didn't have a Fender. I had the SG). Then her thoughts caught up with reality. "No, he has a Gibson guitar." And then: "Hey, wait a minute, Gibson is a good name for a boy." Later that night, she told me about the Fenton sign and the Gibson idea. That's all I needed to hear. I was in. We named him Gibson. Was he named after the SG? Not totally, but kinda... Soon after he was born, I said I was going to give him the SG when he turned 16. He turned, and I gave it to him. He never joined a band or anything, but he taught himself to play. Last time I visited him, it was sitting in the corner of his bedroom. He's proud of the guitar, and proud of his name. Fast forward to last fall. That's when, after a 30-year break, I got back into playing and buying and selling guitars. In a big way. It's consumed me the past several months. And I've had a notion in the back of my mind I should probably get an SG, for sentimental reasons at least. I've looked at a few in the past months, played a couple every time I visit the GC. Nothing really called to me. I thought maybe I was all grown up and just didn't feel the SG love anymore. (And I have fallen in love with a couple Fenders and a Heritage, along the way). Then on Sunday, I popped on Facebook and someone had just listed a 2015 SG Special for a decent price. I made him an offer, he bit and I got in the car and headed over to look at it. Turns out, it was minty fresh, played like soft butter, sounded like smoky brisket. Cherry finish, zebra humbuckers, fast comfortable neck. Everything is just nice and easy. The G-Force tuner thingy is something I would never seek out, but, ummm, I'm already spoiled by it. As I was heading back home on Sunday with the new SG in the back seat, it hit me. It was Father's Day. Of course, it was the day to get my SG. So next time I talk to Gibson (my son), I'm gonna tell him when he has a kid, that kid has a 2015 SG waiting for him or her on their 16th birthday...
  8. Forgive the length of this, but it's all true... When I was 15, my Dad and I went in on a Gibson SG. That meant it was my guitar, he just ponied up half the money. I think we paid $225 for it. Or maybe that was my half. Either way, this was in the late 70s, and it was a 1972 SG. I was learning to play guitar at the time, and that was my one and only electric ride for the next decade, through a couple or three bands, many hours alone, in the practice rooms, and on stage. Fast forward to the early 1990s, and I had long given up pursuing the Rock Star dream and only played once in a while. But a son was on the way, and his mom and I were in that phase where you try and figure out a good name for the baby. Discussions, notes, baby name books, etc. She was probably 7 months pregnant and driving one day when she saw a road sign pointing the way to a town called Fenton. "Hmm," she thought to herself. "That's a good boy's name." Then a bell went off. "Wait, Mark (that's me) has a Fenton guitar." "Oh, no," she mused, "I think it's called a Fender." (I didn't have a Fender. I had the SG). Then her thoughts caught up with reality. "No, he has a Gibson guitar." And then: "Hey, wait a minute, Gibson is a good name for a boy." Later that night, she told me about the Fenton sign and the Gibson idea. That's all I needed to hear. I was in. We named him Gibson. Was he named after the SG? Not totally, but kinda... Soon after he was born, I said I was going to give him the SG when he turned 16. He turned, and I gave it to him. He never joined a band or anything, but he taught himself to play. Last time I visited him, it was sitting in the corner of his bedroom. He's proud of the guitar, and proud of his name. Fast forward to last fall. That's when, after a 30-year break, I got back into playing and buying and selling guitars. In a big way. It's consumed me the past several months. And I've had a notion in the back of my mind I should probably get an SG, for sentimental reasons at least. I've looked at a few in the past months, played a couple every time I visit the GC. Nothing really called to me. I thought maybe I was all grown up and just didn't feel the SG love anymore. (And I have fallen in love with a couple Fenders and a Heritage, along the way). Then on Sunday, I popped on Facebook and someone had just listed a 2015 SG Special for a decent price. I made him an offer, he bit and I got in the car and headed over to look at it. Turns out, it was minty fresh, played like soft butter, sounded like smoky brisket. Cherry finish, zebra humbuckers, fast comfortable neck. Everything is just nice and easy. The G-Force tuner thingy is something I would never seek out, but, ummm, I'm already spoiled by it. As I was heading back home on Sunday with the new SG in the back seat, it hit me. It was Father's Day. Of course, it was the day to get my SG. So next time I talk to Gibson (my son), I'm gonna tell him when he has a kid, that kid has a 2015 SG waiting for him or her on their 16th birthday...
  9. I was able to a bit of detective work on this mystery guitar, thanks to some info that was in the case, which led me to a conversation with its original owner. this guitar was a one-off, made by the aforementioned Gibson luthiers in the custom shop in Bozeman for the 1998 NAMM show. It was a centerpiece of the Gibson display that year. Back in those days, according to the original owner, Guitar Center used to buy the entire Gibson NAMM display each year and sell the pieces in various stores. This one ended up in the Guitar Center in Fountain Valley, Calif., where the original owner purchased it. He sold it in 2004 to a collector on the East Coast. It is indeed made from master grade Brazilian rosewood and is mint. Sings like a bird. I was able to get in touch with Val Bolitho, and she remembers her contribution to the instrument was working on the neck.
  10. Thanks for the replies, all! Hogeye, you really know how to make someone's day. That's some deep intel. Gold mine. Thanks much!! I will PM you if I can figure out how...
  11. New to the board, so hello everybody. I've recently acquired a Gibson classical guitar and am trying to learn more about it than I already know. Hoping someone here can help or give suggestions on how to figure out some things about it. Like, how rare is it? It's value? The guitar doesn't have a serial number and does not appear to be part of a Gibson line of classicals. (In other words, it's not a C-0 or C-1, etc.) It appears to be made of master grade Brazilian wood. The label inside the guitar reports it was made in January 1998, and reads: Master Built, Master Grade Concert Guitar. Made in Bozeman. And it has the signatures of 5 Gibson luthiers, Valerie Bolitho, Ren Ferguson, Kevin Kopp, Michael Bakeburg (or Bakeberg) and one name I can't quite make out. Perhaps Philip Seymour? There's nothing terribly fancy (inlays, hardware) about the guitar. But the excellent build and quality of the wood is very apparent. Anyways, I'm wondering if the Bozeman shop in 1998-99 had room for side projects that the luthiers would undertake. Could this have been made to order for a buyer? Any thoughts are greatly appreciated.
×
×
  • Create New...