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pickinbuddy

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About pickinbuddy

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  1. Shalom! As a former metal plater myself, the problem with all gold plating--is that it's soft and thin...and since it's relatively more expensive than nickel and chrome, manufacturers tend to take some 'short cuts' with it. 24 karat gold plating is pure gold--but it's the softest; whereas 10 karat gold is a slight alloy--but harder and more durable as a plated surface. Some of the older style of plating appears to be a deeper gold color, and this actually has very little to do with the choice of karat used--but a combination of the LENGTH of time the metal part is left in the plating bath solution--as well as an undercoat of copper plating (known as "copper flashing") and this is why some of those older 1920s and 1930s instruments have that deep burnished gold color. The metal part is first given a copper flash coat--and then gold plated OVER that. The best solution (no pun intended) is to locate a commercial metal plating company that does gold plating and have your parts shipped to them with a letter describing exactly what you want. Hope this info helps! All the best! Bill Turner
  2. VERY simple....TIME! Just play it and enjoy it...and TIME will do the rest. Nickel ages beautifully all by itself....
  3. My favorite is....LINK WRAY, the daddy of 'em all..... Bill Turner
  4. Harsh?....I think that pretty much depends on the amp. I use a Twin Reverb with Altec Lansing speakers, so even with the guitar's controls on 10, it's nicely rich and clean--though I'll back the volume pot on the guitar to "9"....and have that 'passing gear' available if I need to go to '10'. Of course if I'm playing a more mellow jazz thing--then I'll back off the tone control and get the right sound for the song... BC:Documents and SettingsBill Turner.OWNER-MACHINEMy DocumentsMy PicturesLes Paul 's Les Paulill Turner[/img][/img]
  5. Harsh?....I think that pretty much depends on the amp. I use a Twin Reverb with Altec Lansing speakers, so even with the guitar's controls on 10, it's nicely rich and clean--though I'll back the volume pot on the guitar to "9"....and have that 'passing gear' available if I need to go to '10'. Of course if I'm playing a more mellow jazz thing--then I'll back off the tone control and get the right sound for the song... BC:Documents and SettingsBill Turner.OWNER-MACHINEMy DocumentsMy PicturesLes Paul 's Les Paulill Turner[/img]
  6. Well...I go strictly by sound and TONE; and my top three favorites are: 1) The Les Paul Professional (precursor of the low impedance Recording Model) 2) The Les Paul Deluxe with those mini humbuckers! 3) Les Paul Gold Top with P-90s
  7. Yes, for the most part it's cosmetic, except for aggessive rhythm guitar playing OR FINGERPICKING.
  8. One of the greatest things about ALL Gibsons...is that ALL the adjustments work and work WELL, unlike some guitars that are just loaded with miniature allen screws on the bridges and the saddles--and after adjusting them for 5 minutes--there isn't any change! Some of those Stratocaster type bridges/saddles actually have too many adjustment points! Don't worry about adjustments on the Les Paul--it's a very precise and stable guitar and it adjusts well....even if you make a mistake on it, it can be easily re-adjusted right back. You can do it yourself with ANY tuner--first of all, get it perfectly in tune, then hit a 12th fret harmonic on each string and then compare it to that same string fretted at the 12th fret. The built-in problem with the extra light gauge strings is that there is a lot of string excursion when you play hard, and it may seem out of tune during harder playing....that's just the nature of .009 strings. Also--they age faster....the extra light gauge strings just wear out faster and intonate flat faster due to age and corrosion. Good old fashioned "trial and error" works best. If the string frets sharp at the 12th fret, then loosen it and adjust the saddle back toward the tailpiece, get it back in tune and then compare the harmonic note to the fretted note. Keep doing this as many times as neccessary on each string. Detuning the string before making the saddle adjustments makes the job quicker. Of course, if it frets flat at the 12th fret, then do the same thing loosening the string and adjust the saddle forward toward the pickups...then retune and compare. ALSO take a pencil, sharpen it and rub some graphite in the grooves at the nut and the saddles--this helps the strings move smoothly during the tuning process. It also preserves the nut and the tuning machines. This pencil graphite trick works on EVERY stringed instrument. Also make sure the "Stop Bar" tailpiece isn't down too far--this can make the bridge sit on a slant. Good Luck! Bill Turner
  9. As a longtime member of the Worlwide Church Of God, I've been playing in church for over 40 years, whenever I've been asked to--either as a a solo or ensemble performer, or as an accompanyist for another performer. I'm a full time professional player, but I'll cheerfully donate my services to the Lord and His work anytime. Music is truly a gift from God, and it's good to share it in spreading the Gospel message, and for the joy it brings to people. Faithfully, Bill Turner Old Bridge NJ[/img]
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