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Found 11 results

  1. We just found my dad’s 1970 something Gibson SJ deluxe in the closet. My dad has asked me to sell it, but I don’t even know where to begin. Any tips or tricks on how to sell? and I’ve seen prices between 2000 and 2700, so I have no idea how much to sell it for.
  2. We all know that this new Epi lineup is just coming out of the oven with this headstock and the Gibson license and recognition, but, really: What about we the left-handed guitar/bass guitar players ? Where do the left-handed models had gone ? I know I'm not the only one asking about this matter but, I'd like to know what the lefties (like me) think about it at this moment?. I must confess that I'd seen videos of Summer NAMM 2020 Epiphone's booth and I think the Les Paul models Epi have develope for this year look really amazing, so I'd really love to get one and play it.
  3. Hello! Here's a bluesy acoustic guitar instrumental that I recorded. Hope you like it! https://youtu.be/mpDF9UQ_xKA
  4. I have a Yamaha FS100C acoustic guitar.In website it says Fingerboard Radius: R400mm (15 3/4") what does it mean I can't understand as I am a beginner.I want to get a capo for it, so i want to know if it has a flat fretboard/fingerboard or radiused fretboard/fingerboard.I bought Daddario NS Artist Capo but D string buzzes a lot even if capo tension is increased somewhat (standard tunning).To check capo pressure i am picking strings downwards just exactly as how we do when tuning a guitar and D string buzzes a lot.I don't want to keep high tension on the strings by tightening the capo a lot as it would defeat the purpose of getting an somewhat expensive capo with screw adjustment for tension too.I am using Gibson light 11 - 52 gauge strings on the guitar after i tried to make the capo work with a little tension adjustment in the screw had no luck, and strings got out of tune after some trials.I have been looking in between NS Artist Capo & Tri-Action Capo from Daddario. Please help, I can return NS Artist Capo and get Tri-Action Capo if its more appropriate for acoustic guitars and for my Yamaha FS100C.Thanks
  5. I have a Yamaha FS100C acoustic guitar.In website it says Fingerboard Radius: R400mm (15 3/4") what does it mean I can't understand as I am a beginner.I want to get a capo for it, so i want to know if it has a flat fretboard/fingerboard or radiused fretboard/fingerboard.I bought Daddario NS Artist Capo but D string buzzes a lot even if capo tension is increased somewhat (standard tunning).To check capo pressure i am picking strings downwards just exactly as how we do when tuning a guitar and D string buzzes a lot.I don't want to keep high tension on the strings by tightening the capo a lot as it would defeat the purpose of getting an somewhat expensive capo with screw adjustment for tension too.I am using Gibson light 11 - 52 gauge strings on the guitar after i tried to make the capo work with a little tension adjustment in the screw had no luck, and strings got out of tune after some trials.I have been looking in between NS Artist Capo & Tri-Action Capo from Daddario. Please help, I can return NS Artist Capo and get Tri-Action Capo if its more appropriate for acoustic guitars and for my Yamaha FS100C.Thanks
  6. I got a 2018 les paul classic with grover tuner pegs. I was wondering what would be the best way to go for swapping them out for the deleux styled tuner pegs ?
  7. In the photos below I have the standard epiphone casino coupe (MIC) I sanded our the layer of what I assume is Poly/gloss. Although I enjoy the original finish I want to get something a little more warm, like the Peerless Epiphone Casino Coupe (MIK) Would anyone know the best supplies and instruction to get it to look just like the (MIK) guitar?
  8. Hi all, I got a crack in the neck of my Epiphone SG right next to the body, see photos. I tried removing the neck but I'm not sure I can (see third photo) and don't want to force it and make things worse. How would you suggest fixing this? Is it possible to remove the neck, apply some wood glue and let dry? Would it be better not to remove the neck at all? It looks like the truss rod doesn't go all the way into the body but I can't be sure. Thanks!
  9. I have an epiphone les paul plus top standard pro and the treble pickup isn't working. Should I bring this into a guitar store to have them look at it or is something I can probably fix. Everything works on the guitar except for the treble pickup and it stopped working over night because it was working the night before and the next day it stopped working. any help would be appreciated.
  10. In my opinion, this is the most vital part of learning to play guitar, figuring out how to fit your part or chords around others. For that reason, I highly recommend every new guitar student buy a looper pedal very early in their lessons, earlier than you may traditionally outfit your rig with pedals and accessories. Here are all the things adding a loop pedal to your practicing can do for you. Learn to stay time and beat Learn to improvise Critique your own playing Grow as a Songwriter Skill Level and Familiarity with the ‘Loop Effect’ Studio Work - Another typical setting for the use of a looper pedal is in studio when recording songs. One of the best things about this pedal is that switching between phrases suffers no latency losses. The reason why you need to decide your budget before everything else is simply because you might get a bit carried away, picking an expensive loop pedal that might not be the one you can actually even use. For example, one of the more expensive models in this review is Boss RC 30. A beginner guitarist might feel like this is everything they ever wanted because the pedal is big, there’s a plethora of features on-board, but what happens is that they eventually get a pedal that they can’t use, or better said, they can’t utilize the features efficiently as some experience is needed. Going back, there’s another reason why you should consider getting a more expensive looper pedal, or better yet – the reason why you should avoid cheap loop pedals. Although the ‘loop effect’ in the traditional sense works the same on every pedal, the cheapest models are simply not reliable. You’ll get constantly annoyed by static interference, feedback, casual blackouts, and such. Another typical setting for the use of a looper pedal is in studio when recording songs. This might be the simplest of the three matters, mainly because you won’t have the pressure of performing live and we can assume that you’ll already know what kind of loops you’ll be using. Generally, in this case as far as versatility is concerned the term ‘the more, the better’ applies perfectly. You can add as many layers as the song demands, as many effects as you feel you need, and pretty much do everything you want, so this is actually the only scenario where any looper will do. Better said, any looper you think is right is probably right. Source Credits: musicauthority.org
  11. Hi all! I'm an acoustic guitar player. Been playing for 45 years or so... Lately interests have been Big Bands n Ballads, though I've played folkie and Texas 'sock' guitar for fiddle backup as well. Figured I needed to learn some rock styles and no better way to learn a style than to get an electric guitar. Of course one has to acquire an amplifier so what better way than to build my own? I got a CeriaTone 100w 183 ODS kit and put it together. Sounds great too. Now I need to learn how to rock n roll! Using an old 'Coffee can' EV SRO12 speaker (built the box it's in) and the 183. Dang! It's loud! Guitar's: 1969 Gibson L6-S, and 1963 Epiphone Casino E230TD, and a Martin D18. I like the 230 because it feels more like an acoustic. I'm used to 'squeezing' chords on acoustic and I get the sense that a lighter touch is required on electric. I hope to learn all I can about 'lectric'
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