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Is this a 1958 Les Paul Special?


Stoopalini

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No serial number to be found, but it appears the POT code is 134808, which translates to 1948 or 1958 through the Guitar Dater Project website.

 

Not sure what the jack in the back is for ... possibly added to produce a stereo signal? It looks to be wired in parallel to the factory jack ... I tested them and they both work fine.

 

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58 was the only year that specials had that rubber ring. Mine never had it. Looks like a refin to me.

That was a factory color late in the production run, but then you would probably see a serial#.

There are also a very few documented 59 single cuts in that color, probably to use up left over bodies at the plant.

But you are most likely correct refined 58 special.

Pick guard was the same from 55-58 on the SC's, hard to tell but it should be B/W/B/ThickW/B if not it may be newer or a repo.

Newer Knobs.

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LOL, I am really colorblind, not joking.

 

Sorry about that. But, this closer look seems to show that there is some kind of red down on the control cavity. It almost looks like it was hand-painted in the cavity. I do see traces of yellow and red on the areas where the plates screw in. hard to say what the original color was from the pics. Also, the (newer?) finish on the body of the guitar looks to be very thin and I saw no checking. It almost looks as if someone did an oiled finish on it or a light coat of clear laquer. You do have a couple of LP Juniors that look original and I'll bet you will see that the ones with the cracked finish look significantly different. Just saying that those two should be worth a lot more when it comes time to sell them.

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Boy 'ol Tommy could never leave them alone huh? Obviously he was not a fan of Kluson tuners as just about every Gibson we've seen from this collection has Grovers. Crazy putting another jack in the back of the control box plate. OK so you want stereo, but having another chord stick out from there doesn't seem like it would work well for actually playing the guitar (sort of poke you in the thigh). But you've mentioned the original owner of these didn't actually play -just collect and modify.

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Boy 'ol Tommy could never leave them alone huh? Obviously he was not a fan of Kluson tuners as just about every Gibson we've seen from this collection has Grovers. Crazy putting another jack in the back of the control box plate. OK so you want stereo, but having another chord stick out from there doesn't seem like it would work well for actually playing the guitar (sort of poke you in the thigh). But you've mentioned the original owner of these didn't actually play -just collect and modify.

 

 

Good point...!!!!

It seems to me that 75% of 60's Gibson electrics were "Groverised" back in the day! It was one hell of a marketing campaign that Grover had "back in the day".....almost "urban legend".......that you HAD to have Grovers to stay in tune.

Thinking back......Poor nut slotting was most likely the "real issue"...caused by stoned do-it-yourselfers....[crying]

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Boy 'ol Tommy could never leave them alone huh? Obviously he was not a fan of Kluson tuners as just about every Gibson we've seen from this collection has Grovers. Crazy putting another jack in the back of the control box plate. OK so you want stereo, but having another chord stick out from there doesn't seem like it would work well for actually playing the guitar (sort of poke you in the thigh). But you've mentioned the original owner of these didn't actually play -just collect and modify.

 

Right, he didn't play .. so my guess is all of these guitars are most likely as he bought them. I don't think he had them customized after the fact, but who knows?

 

Maybe the guitar was played like a lap steel and it was more comfortabe to plug in on the back,

so the chord hung down instead of out sideways. Just a guess.

 

That's a good possibility ... I can't think of any other reason to do this, rather than just using a 1/4" splitter in the chain.

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  • 8 years later...

I believe the pots codes "134808" translates to 1958 8th week. Can't explain the jack in the control cover but folks did wild things to guitars back in 50s thru 70s? The extra jack is far less intrusive  than a Bigsby and really reversible if need be. Looks like it was TV finish originally since traces are seen in the control cavities, but it doesn't look bad as a cherry finish. The trussrod cover, bridge, and volume/tone knobs is modern. Again folks did odd things before Ebay put these guitars on the radar, meaning now these vintage LPs have a worldwide price and recognition. The Grovers are a welcome addition that won't retract in many circles (players preferred). It's great that the p90 pups seem to be originals and the control harness less one capacitor. My 1958 LP Special doesn't have the shock ring  under the switch but has the poker chip as many 58's did. Nice player!

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