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Just a quick question before I take the Hummingbird in....


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Hey guys, I just wanted some opinions on whether or not to get a compensated saddle when I take my Hummingbird in on Monday. I talked to the guy I have been going to for setups and unfortunately hes working on Monday. Sucks for him but it's good for me. Two of my three other guitars have the compensated saddles but in all honesty I don't really notice anything different. Any thought???

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That's a question I've been wondering about myself. I see fully compensated bridge pieces and think that I may have to get one and try it on the J-45 Custom & or the Dove.

 

I'll see what gets said with great interest!!

 

Aster

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If you're saying you don't notice any difference in the intonation between a straight saddle and a compensated saddle, then keep the straight saddle. I've got guitars that are intonated just fine with straight saddles and other's that are fine with compensated saddles - my J-200 came from Bozeman with a compensated saddle. I play up the neck to 10 and 12 quite a bit and the more accurate the intonation, the better I like it. When the intonation is off far enough, the higher up the neck you play, the more noticeable the pitch differences become, causing chords to sound out of tune. If you're staying below 5 or 7, not so noticeable.

 

 

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If you're saying you don't notice any difference in the intonation between a straight saddle and a compensated saddle, then keep the straight saddle. If you're staying below 5 or 7, not so noticeable.

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My experience exactly.

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I'm pretty lame on the topic, but it's a good Q.

 

Guess it doesn't matter if there's nothing obvious.

 

Please report, I'd like to learn.

 

 

 

BK - admit I have the feeling you are one hell of a player - and had it for a long time.

You should let us hear that J-200, , , and the Mart as well ;-)

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Guitar wood is always moving, humidity, temperature, etc.....so when a guitar is compensated in present time, the compensation may be off a month later. If the guitar is new, and the belly rises in the first few months, again compensation off. Change strings from 12's to 13's...again compensation off. adjust the truss rod on the neck...again compensation changes....lol....BUT better to have the compensation on at least the B string than not. Also, one of the reasons I like floating bridges and saddles...PERFECT compensation every time!!!

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