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Happy Memorial Day Weekend


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Happy Memorial Day weekend everybody. I know this holiday is about all those that died during service but I wanted to give a shout out to all you Veterans, and those in service now, out there! It's hard to think what we would do without all you brave men and women. msp_thumbup.gif You guys make America what it is. Strong and Proud!!

 

I have some fun pictures of my dad during WW2 thought I'd share them with you all. Hope you enjoy and please add your own if you have any!

 

 

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The USS Ranger group shot, my dad in there somewhere. :)

 

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Asbury Park, NJ home on leave with buddies. My dads in the middle.

 

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Obviously San Francisco on leave. :) My father on the right.

 

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Probably San Francisco

 

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This was his official shoot with the navy, they allowed him a few extra shots with his nephew whom he adored. Happy Memorial Day! Hope you guys had fun looking and lets see some of yours!!

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Amen. My Dad was a Corporal in the Marines in both WWII and the Korean War. He was so anxious to join he lied about his age to get in at age 17 without his father's permission. Dad passed away back in 2007 and although he never talked about his time in the wars, he was obviously affected by it and never fully got over watching so many of his buddies die. He was a tough "grunt" who loved the Corp and only in his last few years did he become much softer and more sentimental than I'd ever seen him before. Saluting everyone past and present in the service. We thank you and appreciate you for your courage and your sacrifice. Semper Fi Dad - R.I.P.

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My family seems to skip a generation of military involvement over the past 200+ years in the U.S. Both my younger bro and I were "back burner boys" due to some physical circumstances of our younger days - regardless that both of us did try to join.

 

Our Dad was Army in WWII and served in the Aleutians when it was so cold it froze a running Jeep engine that had antifreeze in it. My bro's eldest is an officer in the National Guard and has deployed to the Middle East.

 

Cindy, loved the Navy pix. A good friend of mine retired as a master chief after serving in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. He started out literally shoveling coal in an old four-stacker destroyer and ended up an electronic communications expert. Although his formal non-military education halted at the eighth grade, he qualified out of a high school diploma, got bachelors and masters degrees and had a second career in education.

 

Those old boys knew about service and duty - although I also recognize they knew a bit about fun, too, when the opportunity availed itself.

 

m

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Im not military but, a big THANK YOU to all military personel. Those picture are UBER COOL. My uncle served over 20 years in the Navy.

 

Thanks Moparguy! I'm glad these pics made it thru the years. I found some great old family photos at my moms and put them on cd's recently. Here's to your uncle's 20 years of service!! Go Navy!

 

 

Amen. My Dad was a Corporal in the Marines in both WWII and the Korean War. He was so anxious to join he lied about his age to get in at age 17 without his father's permission. Dad passed away back in 2007 and although he never talked about his time in the wars, he was obviously affected by it and never fully got over watching so many of his buddies die. He was a tough "grunt" who loved the Corp and only in his last few years did he become much softer and more sentimental than I'd ever seen him before. Saluting everyone past and present in the service. We thank you and appreciate you for your courage and your sacrifice. Semper Fi Dad - R.I.P.

 

Wow the Marines! My dad left high school early but still graduated somehow. His senior picture has him wearing his uniform and is coincidentally on the same page as my father in law in his uniform. My dad guided planes coming in onto the carrier. It was probably one of the safer spots to be. I can't imagine the horrors some had to endure during the wars. Glad your dad had his chance to show his softer side.

 

My family seems to skip a generation of military involvement over the past 200+ years in the U.S. Both my younger bro and I were "back burner boys" due to some physical circumstances of our younger days - regardless that both of us did try to join.

 

Our Dad was Army in WWII and served in the Aleutians when it was so cold it froze a running Jeep engine that had antifreeze in it. My bro's eldest is an officer in the National Guard and has deployed to the Middle East.

 

Cindy, loved the Navy pix. A good friend of mine retired as a master chief after serving in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. He started out literally shoveling coal in an old four-stacker destroyer and ended up an electronic communications expert. Although his formal non-military education halted at the eighth grade, he qualified out of a high school diploma, got bachelors and masters degrees and had a second career in education.

 

Those old boys knew about service and duty - although I also recognize they knew a bit about fun, too, when the opportunity availed itself.

 

m

 

Milo, I'm sure you and your brother felt differently but I bet your mom was happy as could be you two were "back burner boys" I pray your nephew returns home safely to his family from the Middle East. Your friend certainly made it a long way from shoveling coal! Just goes to prove if your determined you can accomplish anything. Something I remind myself everyday with guitar. And yeah my dad had some fun and made some life long friends along the way. He was one of the lucky ones to be coming home at the end.

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Hello!

 

Something from a bit earlier.

 

http://en.wikipedia....i/Nicholas_Kont

 

My family has some military heritage. Most of my forefathers were soldiers. Nicolaus Kont de Újlaky is among the firsts we are proud of. (Even though, it is His brother who is a direct ancestor of mine)

 

Cheers... Bence

 

Holy Cow, your ancestor has his own Wikipedia page!! Nice going Bence, do we need to call your Sir Bence or anything like that? lol Also if you live in a castle I vote you to host a Gibson meet up for us all? msp_thumbup.gif

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Holy Cow, your ancestor has his own Wikipedia page!! Nice going Bence, do we need to call your Sir Bence or anything like that? lol Also if you live in a castle I vote you to host a Gibson meet up for us all? msp_thumbup.gif

 

 

He is not the only one, actually. But that`s the long-gone past. We lost the baronial title in early 18th century, due to an ancestor taking part in the revolution led by Ferenc Rákoczy II. against the Habsburgs. Since then we were just common nobles. Then...all noble titles were deleted in Hungary in 1945.

 

Neither we had any castles for half a millenium...some land in the Hungarian Highlands (currently belongs Slovakia), from where my grandparents have been deported right after WWII.

 

The only title I have inherited is the title of "vitéz" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vit%C3%A9z). I am just a lower-middle class guy...:D

 

Sic transit gloria mundi...

 

Cheers... Bence

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I was stationed at Ft. Myer, which is where the 3rd Infantry is assigned to guarding the Tomb of the Unknown. I will tell you that these guys take that duty very, very serious, and consider it a real honor to be able to "guard" the Tomb.

 

I wasn't in the 3rd however, I was a "Chairborne Ranger" serving in the Pentagon! Regards to all my fellow Veterans.

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the "Military hero" of my family, my Great-Great Grandfather.

Evan James Hughes

Corporal, Co.C, 6th Va. Cavalry

served for almost the entire war, at least 11 engagements including Gettysburg where he lost an eye.

Captured the following year, "Federalized" to avoid prison-camp, and wore his shiny new Federal Blue uniform out west (even missing an eye) until he was discharged for insanity because he asked his post Chaplain to perform a Christian wedding for him & his Native American bride.

After discharge he worked as a Bounty Hunter and eventually a Wells-Fargo Special Agent.

 

GarysCam003.jpg

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He is not the only one, actually. But that`s the long-gone past. We lost the baronial title in early 18th century, due to an ancestor taking part in the revolution led by Ferenc Rákoczy II. against the Habsburgs. Since then we were just common nobles. Then...all noble titles were deleted in Hungary in 1945.

 

Neither we had any castles for half a millenium...some land in the Hungarian Highlands (currently belongs Slovakia), from where my grandparents have been deported right after WWII.

 

The only title I have inherited is the title of "vitéz" (http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Vit%C3%A9z). I am just a lower-middle class guy...:D

 

Sic transit gloria mundi...

 

Cheers... Bence

 

Thats a very interesting story behind your title of Vitez! At least your family once had a castle. My grandmother lived in a English Tutor and my sister and I thought it was a castle when we were little. msp_smile.gif Thats as close as I come.

 

I was stationed at Ft. Myer, which is where the 3rd Infantry is assigned to guarding the Tomb of the Unknown. I will tell you that these guys take that duty very, very serious, and consider it a real honor to be able to "guard" the Tomb.

 

I wasn't in the 3rd however, I was a "Chairborne Ranger" serving in the Pentagon! Regards to all my fellow Veterans.

 

I have visited and it's quite impressive to see the soldiers guarding the Tomb. I was reading thru the history of the Tomb and learned the remains in the middle tomb of the Vietnam veteran placed in were later identified thru DNA as First Lieutenant Michael Blassie, and removed. How interesting, I'm not sure I ever knew that. If I did I certainly forgot. Thank you for your years of service DennisG!

 

 

the "Military hero" of my family, my Great-Great Grandfather.

Evan James Hughes

Corporal, Co.C, 6th Va. Cavalry

served for almost the entire war, at least 11 engagements including Gettysburg where he lost an eye.

Captured the following year, "Federalized" to avoid prison-camp, and wore his shiny new Federal Blue uniform out west (even missing an eye) until he was discharged for insanity because he asked his post Chaplain to perform a Christian wedding for him & his Native American bride.

After discharge he worked as a Bounty Hunter and eventually a Wells-Fargo Special Agent.

 

GarysCam003.jpg

Awesome!! Great picture and incredible story to go along with it! Thanks for adding.

 

 

 

 

 

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Bender...

 

There were quite a few men in the situation of your GGfather. Known often as "Galvanized Yankees," they did play a strong role in "the west" that was still a difficult place into the early 1890s.

 

Contrary to movies, too, the frontier Army during and post 1865 often did far more than maintain contact with "Indians." I know of at least one major example where a "fort" was virtually emptied of its companies of infantry to help recover and rebuild from flooding in its general area.

 

I still have the diary of my own GGfather, the first milod, during that 1860s "unpleasantness." Oddly to some, the diary spoke not a contrary word about the confederates or confederacy regardless that his unit through the war had, as I recall, something like a 50 percent casualty rate just mostly doing "scout" and "transportation protection" sorts of duty.

 

IMHO, sometimes as old soldiers age, their memories of hardships are often recognized best by those on the other side in those conflicts - not the homebodies and folks of later ages who haven't a clue other than current political dogma. I think there are some major cultural exceptions such as an old friend who, to this day, has his adrenalin rise when he sees an Asian person - regardless that he knows not all Asians are the Japanese he fought in the island campaigns in the south Pacific.

 

OTOH, I feel I really missed an opportunity to do a piece on a WWI fighter ace. All those men in those powered kites had incredible courage, if not bravado. They changed the world from horses and steam to airplanes. He refused on grounds of concerns because he was a German ace. Still, what a story.

 

m

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