Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Recommended Posts

I'm not sure if Gibsons come with the single compensated saddle..

*but does anyone ever have issues with these things and prefer strait traditional saddles?

*If a guitar comes with the compensated saddle,as some Martins do..will a non compensated go right in and be in the correct spot..or are they routed in a spot for use with the compensated type?

Link to post
Share on other sites

is something sacrificed for more accurate intonation ? i never understood why one manufacturer would use compensated and another just a straight saddle . regardless of bracing , wood choices shape etc , the same physics apply to all acoustics and strings . why would a j45 need comoensated saddle when a d28 doesnt ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the intonation issue is different from guitar to guitar. I've heard some that are terribly wrong without a cut saddle and others that sound just fine with a straight saddle. In general, I'd say most instruments will get some benefit from an intonated saddle just because of the physics BBG mentioned.

Link to post
Share on other sites

.

My J-200 came with a tusq saddle compensated at the B string, making the B string a tad longer. The first pic below looks very similar to my Gibson factory installed compensated tusq saddle. The crown edge runs straight along the front edge of the saddle and in the B string area the crown edge is moved to the back edge of the saddle. On a single compensated saddle, typically the B is set to the back edge and the crown angle is straight, but I've seen guitars with a single compensation at the G string.

 

No issues. I've got acoustic guitars with and without compensated saddles, none of them have issues. I can't recall having any issues with guitars I own. But, I've come across guitars that had enough of an intonation issue to be annoying above 7.

 

Usually a compensated saddle simply moves the crown edge at the top of the saddle to make the compensation, so it doesn't effect the thickness of the saddle or the fit in the saddle channel. In the second pic below you can see how the edge of the saddle crown can be angled to give different break points to each string if need be.

 

Here's a thread from last week on the subject - http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/102021-just-a-quick-question-before-i-take-the-hummingbird-in/

 

Graph_Tech_TUSQ_Acoustic_Guitar_Saddle__72703.jpg

 

saddle.compensation1.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The main issue for me is not the intonation..but the uneven ness of how the strings either travel across fingerboard or lay over these things.

This guitar (Martin D42) has a compensated saddle which squiggles along compensating just about every string not just the b.

And just about every string breaks over the saddle at a different angle..and it just doesn't feel as if the strings are where they should be when I go for the notes when I pick.

Link to post
Share on other sites

.

I see - the compensated saddle you have has altered the string spacing or height enough to be bothersome. . You could purchase an inexpensive straight plastic saddle, de-tune and remove the current compensated saddle, use its height/crown to trim the plastic saddle. Then insert the plastic saddle, tune up and see if the string spacing is better. You'll probably find the intonation acceptable especially if you don't chord above 5 or 7. If it works out you could then have a straight saddle made out of your favorite material.

 

 

.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...