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Les Paul rattling


Zeppeholic

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So i just got my LP standard back from a setup at guitar center..

 

out of the box, i think the strings were 9-42 gauage, and with a good tune-up it was fine.

 

GC replaced my strings with 10-46's and now there's a lot of buzzing and rattling coming from the neck and the rattling is coming from the bridge.

 

i was wondering; if i change the strings to the 9-42 guage, will the buzzing or rattle stop or at least be decreased? the neck and everything is fine, but it's the strings i think.. anyhow, any help with the string thing will really be appreciated

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Guest Farnsbarns

Right. Let's be clear here...

 

The truss rod has nothing to do with neck angle, it adjusts the amount of relief in the neck. That's how much the neck bends under the string tension. It pulls back against the strings.

 

Because of the above, changing from 9s to 10s will increase the relief, not decrease it.

 

Further, your LP would have shipped with 10s on it.

 

If you sent it to GC for a setup they have done a bad job. You can't really send a guitar for a setup unless you really trust the person doing it and their knowledge of how you want it. This needs to be dealt with face to face.

 

 

Ultimately, you would do well to learn how to set a guitar up yourself. It's really not hard.

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Right. Let's be clear here...

 

The truss rod has nothing to do with neck angle, it adjusts the amount of relief in the neck. That's how much the neck bends under the string tension. It pulls back against the strings.

 

Because of the above, changing from 9s to 10s will increase the relief, not decrease it.

 

Further, your LP would have shipped with 10s on it.

 

If you sent it to GC for a setup they have done a bad job. You can't really send a guitar for a setup unless you really trust the person doing it and their knowledge of how you want it. This needs to be dealt with face to face.

 

 

Ultimately, you would do well to learn how to set a guitar up yourself. It's really not hard.

 

 

 

do you have a link?

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...yep, what FarnsBarns said...adjust the truss rod to get the right relief, set the height of strings (action) and adjust saddle for intonation.

 

Is it a rattle you hear or fret buzzing (i.e. strings hitting the frets when you pick)?

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Guest Farnsbarns

do you have a link?

 

Nope, let's make it so there is one next time....

 

Pass something beneath the A string and above the D string so it gently holds the E string on the first fret. I don't use a capo here as many will suggest as the extra pressure causes the string to ramp over the fret so that it goes higher than the top of the fret. I usually have a cotton bud lying about as I would normally have just cleaned the fretboard if I'm doing a set up, I use that fed through the strings to hold the E at the first.

 

Now use your finger to hold the E string just beyond the last fret.

 

Now your E string is creating a straight line from the first fret to the last.

 

Adjust your truss rod (at first) until you have about 0.5 of a mm gap between the E string and the 8th or 9th fret. If there is any fret wear you might need to increase this a little but try at 0.5 first.

 

Next set the bridge height until you get the right balance between action height and buzz. If you have to go very high to eliminate buzz (or make it acceptable) increase the amount of relief.

 

If you can't get this 3 way balance to work at any sensible action hight, it is likely you need a fret dress.

 

To set intonation roughly just compare the 12th fret harmonic to the fretted note at the 12th. If the fretted note is sharp, increase he string length, if it's flat, decrease the length. Always retune to pitch after each adjustment before checking again. Use a decent tuner, not your ear.

 

That's it. A basic setup. There are loads of articles around about setting intonation and certainly setting it right at the 12th is a massive simplification but it will get you close.

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So i just got my LP standard back from a setup at guitar center..

 

out of the box, i think the strings were 9-42 gauage, and with a good tune-up it was fine.

 

GC replaced my strings with 10-46's and now there's a lot of buzzing and rattling coming from the neck and the rattling is coming from the bridge.

 

i was wondering; if i change the strings to the 9-42 guage, will the buzzing or rattle stop or at least be decreased? the neck and everything is fine, but it's the strings i think.. anyhow, any help with the string thing will really be appreciated

 

You can try changing the strings, but you should find a guy in your area that does guitar work. That way you can let him know exactally how you want your guitar set up and with what strings. Guitar center set-ups are typically contracted out, typically to the place that will do the work for the cheapest so their set-ups (for the most part, i'm sure there are a few that do a good job) suck.

 

It may be worth it to take your guitar for another set up with someone else if you're like and and don't have the skills to do it yourself.

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...the rattling is coming from the bridge...

If the rattling is coming from the bridge it's unlikely to be neck-related...

 

Sometimes bridge-saddles can buzz when not properly bedded down.

If I were you I'd check out the hardware (saddles, adjuster screws etc.) at that end before you start to monkey around with the truss-rod - especially if you don't know what you are doing.

 

Jus' Sayin'......

 

P.

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If the rattling is coming from the bridge it's unlikely to be neck-related...

 

Sometimes bridge-saddles can buzz when not properly bedded down.

If I were you I'd check out the hardware (saddles, adjuster screws etc.) at that end before you start to monkey around with the truss-rod - especially if you don't know what you are doing.

 

Jus' Sayin'......

 

P.

 

Coupla' things to check:

 

1. Make sure the machine head nuts are snug.

2. Check the retaining wire on the bridge (if equipped)

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Guest Farnsbarns

 

 

there's a lot of buzzing and rattling coming from the neck and the rattling is coming from the bridge.

 

 

If the rattling is coming from the bridge it's unlikely to be neck-related...

 

Sometimes bridge-saddles can buzz when not properly bedded down.

If I were you I'd check out the hardware (saddles, adjuster screws etc.) at that end before you start to monkey around with the truss-rod - especially if you don't know what you are doing.

 

Jus' Sayin'......

 

P.

 

I read that as buzzing from the neck and rattling from the bridge. It is a little ambiguous. OP, would you mind clarifying that.

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2. Check the retaining wire on the bridge (if equipped)

I had thought about that - and I might very well be wrong (as the OP didn't mention a year) - but if it's a post-79(?) Standard it will have a Nashville bridge and therefore no wire.

 

P.

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