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This ones good too.

 

 

Gotta admit I thought Steve Morse would be an ill fit for Deep Purple. An American from the South? Looks like I was wrong. It's most interesting to me how he fits in yet still brings his own thing... he still sounds like the player he has always been, yet manages to fit into Purple. True musicianship indeed. [thumbup]

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I admire and have all props and respect for Mr. Dregs, but for me The Purple was and is all about the Blackmore. I'll take Anything From The Made In Japan Record for 2000, Alex.

 

rct

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I admire and have all props and respect for Mr. Dregs, but for me The Purple was and is all about the Blackmore. I'll take Anything From The Made In Japan Record for 2000, Alex.

 

rct

 

 

I honestly think DP is a better band with Morse than they ever were with Blackmore. If there was ever a defining member of the band it was Jon Lords.

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I honestly think DP is a better band with Morse than they ever were with Blackmore. If there was ever a defining member of the band it was Jon Lords.

 

I definitely get that, I'd probably agree they are a better band, and Jon was the heart and soul of that thing. Blackmore just had...oozed...Rock Star. Bad attitude, moody, mercurial, whatever. Did more with one volume and two pickups into a Marshall than anyone else for me in my youth. I still use my strats with only two, but I leave out the middle altogether, he made it ok for me when I found out he used a fake in there.

 

Sloppy, drunken brawl rock and roll at its finest on the Japan record. What a glorious noise ehy??!!

 

rct

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I'd play SOTW three times, Highway Star, anything, long as we did Maybe I'm A Leo. One of my absolute favorite songs to play in a band. You guys here are the first I've seen even say those four words in...a decade at least.

 

rct

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Blame it all on Rabs for reminding me how much I love Deep Purple. [thumbup]

Pick a favorite track and post it here.

 

This one has always moved me. I love the way it starts off like a

slow and unassuming blues and then kicks in...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bClyQKGDa6A

 

 

My link Blackmore being avante-garde (Mandrake Root) evidence of crazy guitar bends with strat whammy.

 

Can't do without Shades of Deep Purple ... line up: Rod Evans (vocals), Nic Simper (bass), Ritchie Blackmore, Ian Paice, Jon Lord. The guitar bends on this album are insane!!! How does he do it, with a strat and a whammy? (I thought early Blackmore played a Gibson ESdot). Blackmore did use, umm I mean abuse, many 70's (fat headstock) strats with a fretboard scalloped on the treble side. Fender did release a Blackmore signature strat with the scalloped fretboard and without the middle pickup. in fact i think Blackmore came from the same area of Britain as jimmy page did. Deep Purple's music blended classical licks with hard rock, especially Blackmore and Lord. Little bit o history friends, Shades of Deep Purple and Book of Taliesyn (both 1968). By the third selftitled album Deep Purple the songs and arrangements had been planned with the original lineup (with Rod Evans and Nic Simper) and last minute and without notice Ian Gillan and Roger Glover came in to record the album with the band. Wow! Deep Purple Mach II is the classic lineup with Gillan, Glover, Blackmore, Lord, and Paice. The 1970 album In Rock gave rise to 'heavy metal' music (along with bands Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin). Blackmore is one of my fav. guitarists, Lord was one of the best keyboard players ever and Ian Paice is one of my fav. drummers ... in fact the whole mach II lineup was all-star. But typical of rock bands, internal tensions tore the classic lineup apart after only a few albums. Later lineups had a few hits like Burn and Stormbringer but nothin' i'd care about ... later Perfect Strangers and Knockin' at Your Backdoor. A lot of DP catalogue is collectable but there's a lot that sucks, later eighties who cares ... Rainbow ... then again who cares about Robert Plant or Jimmy Page when they're not together? Blackmore does Blackmore's Night (medieval minstrel) now and wears a wig because he's bald. Jon Lord has recently passed away. Paice isn't really doing anything earth shattering, basically four on the floor and Gillian has lost some of his vocal range. I wish a classic album like MachineHead would be remastered because the original is dull sounding.

Blackmore, like Page coming from southeast Britain, was also a talented London studio musician playing with The Outlaws and Lord Sutch before Deep Purple. Deep Purple was hugely popular in Britian, not enjoying American successes as much as other bands such as Led Zeppelin. A note on the seemingly dark atmosphere and content of Deep Purple's music: Ozzy Osbourne has commented on Black Sabbath's dark image that compared to the 'sunshine and flower power' of the time in American music, growing up in post-war Britain was anything but sunny ... the forebearers of heavy metal, Zepp, Purple, and Sabbath, heavy British bands, all have that dark character about them. Deep Purple approach to songwriting was essentially 'blues-based' like The Rolling Stones (as opposed to 'pop' based like The Beatles) before melding elements of dinosaur rock that would become HEAVY METAL through the seventies along with Zepp and Sabbath. The American comparison to the dark brooding side of psychedelic music might be Jim Morrison and The Doors. So many elements of Deep Purple (especially mach II) are seminal in hard rock music today, for example, Ian Gillan pioneered the heavy metal screaaaaaammmm! (reference highway star)

 

Essential Deep Purple listening:

Shades of Deep Purple (1968)

some tracks on In Rock (1970)

some tracks on Fireball (1971)

Machinehead (1972)

a couple of tracks on Burn and Stormbringer (1974)

Deepest Purple (greatest hits)

It is worth looking for bonus tracks on some releases like Emeretta on Deep Purple (1969) that weren't included on the original album. There's also few bonus tracks from Book of Taliesyn: Playground, Nonono, etc... (available on MP3)

 

WHO"S GONNA FILL THEIR SHOES? (a future release .... ????)

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I wish a classic album like MachineHead would be remastered because the original is dull sounding.

 

It has been - twice in fact. Once for the 25th anniversary and again in 2012 for the 40th anniversary.

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just put the entire Machine Head album and I'm done...

 

Oh, but I love me some MKIII Purple too... The voices of Glenn Hughes and David Coverdale were great together. (Always hated that album cover though)

 

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