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Dan1959

Guitar to complement an SG

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Hi to all!

 

I own a Gibson SG standard model, which I really enjoy playing.

 

I'm itching for another guitar to complement my SG (a great, great, rock guitar). I'm taking my time trying a variety of models for sound and feel, but I was curious to gather some opinions from you experts out there :) based on your experiences.

 

I play classic rock ranging from Beatles, Stones to AC/DC to even a Scorpions song or two. I also play some blues and some motown. I am an amateur player who plays for the sheer joy of playing guitar, so I'm by no means a pro by any stretch of the imagination.

 

Any input will be appreciated. Looking forward to reading your opinions.

 

Cheers!

 

D.

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First, I'd say that "bonding" with a guitar is so subjective that you kinda pays your money and takes your choice.

 

Okay, there are those who would suggest a Fender solidbody of some sort. I personally do not like their necks and I prefer the shorter 24 3/4 scale compared to the 25 1/2 of most Fenders.

 

Too, there's the question of "what sound."

 

You might wish to look into a semi-hollow or even a thin hollow like the Epi Casino. A Casino Elitist is virtually into ES335 price tag and you're talking P90s instead of humbuckers.

 

A 335 - and if one considers Epi versions as well as Gibson versions - is incredibly versatile and Gib/Epi offers a batch of price points. The HB lets you go pretty much from jazz to stuff you're talking about and it's great IMHO for blues.

 

But here's the rub.

 

IMHO the SG Standard is an incredibly versatile guitar too.

 

And if you like the "feel," you're going to have to consider what other "type" of guitar will seem to most help you play as opposed to learn to play.

 

As a personal example, I started on classical guitars 50 years ago, played about every kind of electric and acoustic you can put your hands on. But... If you look at my avatar, and consider my "play out" favorites? They're roughly the size and shape of a classical guitar. Price tag, whatever, became roughly irrelevant. OTOH, I also happen to love my SG-shaped early '70s Guild S100c as a "player."

 

So... I guess so much depends on what you feel comfortable with. I know that I messed with more guitars in the '60s and '70s than I can remember at all.

 

It's interesting. And frustrating.

 

<grin>

 

Have fun. I do.

 

m

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Sounds to me like you have a lot of the rock and blues sounds down with your SG. You might look into a Stratocaster or telecaster to capture some of the earlier Motown type sounds that you're looking for. Also, you can't beat Fender guitars for chimey and sweet sounds.

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Its interesting that you mention bonding with the guitar as that's exactly what happened with my SG.

 

I have tried semi-hollows and Fender types. Some days, I want to go in one direction, and the next in a completely different direction. I will know when I bond with the guitar. You're right, its all part of the fun and I'm having a blast!

 

Thanks and I'll keep you posted.

 

Ciao for now,

 

D.

 

First, I'd say that "bonding" with a guitar is so subjective that you kinda pays your money and takes your choice.

 

Okay, there are those who would suggest a Fender solidbody of some sort. I personally do not like their necks and I prefer the shorter 24 3/4 scale compared to the 25 1/2 of most Fenders.

 

Too, there's the question of "what sound."

 

You might wish to look into a semi-hollow or even a thin hollow like the Epi Casino. A Casino Elitist is virtually into ES335 price tag and you're talking P90s instead of humbuckers.

 

A 335 - and if one considers Epi versions as well as Gibson versions - is incredibly versatile and Gib/Epi offers a batch of price points. The HB lets you go pretty much from jazz to stuff you're talking about and it's great IMHO for blues.

 

But here's the rub.

 

IMHO the SG Standard is an incredibly versatile guitar too.

 

And if you like the "feel," you're going to have to consider what other "type" of guitar will seem to most help you play as opposed to learn to play.

 

As a personal example, I started on classical guitars 50 years ago, played about every kind of electric and acoustic you can put your hands on. But... If you look at my avatar, and consider my "play out" favorites? They're roughly the size and shape of a classical guitar. Price tag, whatever, became roughly irrelevant. OTOH, I also happen to love my SG-shaped early '70s Guild S100c as a "player."

 

So... I guess so much depends on what you feel comfortable with. I know that I messed with more guitars in the '60s and '70s than I can remember at all.

 

It's interesting. And frustrating.

 

<grin>

 

Have fun. I do.

 

m

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Just for the heck of it, then...

 

Try a full hollow - probably the 16-inch lower bout version with a 24 3/4 scale.

 

Yeah, it's more likely to feed back at high stage volumes, but... it's the roots of rock as well as jazz.

 

I'm not saying, "buy one," but rather "try one."

 

m

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its interesting that you said you want to compliment your SG. I was a fender mustang player for a long time and I didn't think there was another guitar. but when I got my sg from a friend for 75.00 back in 1979 I found out it was more comfortable for me to play. I would look at the es 339 just as I am going to do when I find one and have the time. its the same size as the les Paul they say and offers different tones being a hollow body. as for me I have added two more SGs to my collection and a les Paul. I also liked what the other guy was saying about a guitar that can help you play as opposed to learn to play. All of my SGs are comfortable to me. That's what I look for now. I am no way a pro player and I learn something new every time I pick one up. this is just what works for me. I hope I could help. good luck

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Thanks!

 

I'll certainly try a few!

 

D.

 

 

Sounds to me like you have a lot of the rock and blues sounds down with your SG. You might look into a Stratocaster or telecaster to capture some of the earlier Motown type sounds that you're looking for. Also, you can't beat Fender guitars for chimey and sweet sounds.

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Very interesting!

 

I came close to buying a Mustang last year and just could not pull the trigger... Can't explain it rationally...Chemistry I suppose.

 

The 339 is quite attractive indeed and is on my must try list.

 

Thanks for taking the time it was most helpful!

 

Cheers!

 

D.

 

 

its interesting that you said you want to compliment your SG. I was a fender mustang player for a long time and I didn't think there was another guitar. but when I got my sg from a friend for 75.00 back in 1979 I found out it was more comfortable for me to play. I would look at the es 339 just as I am going to do when I find one and have the time. its the same size as the les Paul they say and offers different tones being a hollow body. as for me I have added two more SGs to my collection and a les Paul. I also liked what the other guy was saying about a guitar that can help you play as opposed to learn to play. All of my SGs are comfortable to me. That's what I look for now. I am no way a pro player and I learn something new every time I pick one up. this is just what works for me. I hope I could help. good luck

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I was introduced to the fender mustang in the republic of panama In 1977. the rec hall had a few of them with bronco amps lol glad I could help.

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My "second" guitar is a Casino. In my opinion, the P90s and hollow body make it more versatile than the SG. It has a warmer, brighter tone that I can't get from my SG. In fact, I tend to play the Casino more than the SG. So, perhaps the SG is my "second" guitar.

 

Someday I plan to get a Tele, but I haven't found one that I like yet. It has to feel right. I don't feel any kind of need to get a Strat.

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I'm assuming your SG has the 490/498 pickup combo in it. So, IMHO, I would suggest a LP with Classic 57's or Classic 57+ pickups or a combination of the two. Another good suggestion since you're looking for variation is a ES-335, a very versatile guitar!. If you really love the feel of an SG get one with P90's in it.

 

However, you need to spend some time in a music store and try them all out, as many as you can lay your hands on. Enjoy the search, and good luck!!! [smile]

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My main guitar is a SG special with burst bucker one and three and split coil. I just ordered a graph tech nut and roller bridge for it. .I have real feelings toward my SG. lol We have seen several women come and go.

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Dear Dan1959,

 

you might have seen some musicians playing countless different guitars in different songs. You only need to think of Billy Gibbons or Joe Bonamassa. Although I am very far from being as talented or famous, I think I know why they are doing so, and experienced it for myself, too: It is just for the songs and the music.

 

Therefore in my humble opinion your question perhaps might be what else guitar complements your personal needs of taste and expression with another sound and/or feel you are missing up to now to fulfill your desire. I think it is more about your likes and ambitions than about what a guitar can do to another one in a stand, case or on the shelf. So it could be that you should make your decision apart from the SG you already own and play, although it probably may act as a benchmark for e. g. convenient playability. I think that other musicians and other amateurs like me can tell you how they would decide or had decided for themselves to give you helpful ideas, but in the end you will have to decide for yourself as you supposed implicitely from the start.

 

When I made decisions to buy several guitars in the past fifteen months, I always had in mind what their use would be for me as songwriter, vocalist and guitar player. I visited several dealers for about 25 to 30 times and checked out circa 150 to 200 instruments. I was just playing parts of my own songs and songs by my bandmates and listened what certain guitars would give back to me when playing. I paid attention to how easy it came to me to find frets blindly, and how different striking and muting techniques apply and translate to the guitar's design.

 

By the way, I think that except those made in the 1970s with the neck set deeper into the body, SGs are the guitars which are hardest to fret, and Stratocasters are the hardest to play with respect to string attack. The best playable guitars for both hands in my opinion are the Les Paul in standard and Axcess shaping as well, and the Fender Telecaster. I can't decide between them, and I even can't when comparing the Axcess shaping to the Telecaster's bolt-on neck joint. For musical reasons, however, I play more often Strats than Teles, and I play my SG Supra excessively for its fantastic piezo sound. I don't miss an acoustic guitar in any way.

 

Strange how things went in the two following respects: I love the fat '50s neck, but besides many '60s Slim Taper neck equipped Gibsons I do own only one LP with a '50s neck and one Axcess which means a fatter neck at the lower frets. My Fenders do have relatively chunky necks, especially the American Deluxe Telecaster Ash. Moreover, my favourite fretboard material is ebony, and I own not a single guitar or bass with! The fantastic, synthetic Richlite fretboard of my SG Supra feels much like ebony, and this is a certain solace for that I hardly find frets blindly on SGs except my 1978 Standard. On both my Frank Zappa "Roxy" SGs it's the sounds that indeed one can't find on any other guitar.

 

Of course, I thoroughly select the amps I use for checking out guitars. In any case a true HiFi amp for acoustic guitar amplification as made by Schertler with all EQs flat is sufficient for me to evaluate both magnetic and piezo pickups for sound. I can imagine what it will sound like when blown through dozens of different amps without testing for that (OK, I am experienced in studio recording and mixing as artist, engineer, or even both at the same time). When it comes to buying, I check for microphonic pickups with an electric guitar amp set to extremely high gain and high volume, preferably an Orange Rockerverb. I don't own one up to now. Orange Amps and cabinets are very fine but extremely heavy. However, the sheer mass seems to do a lot to their sound which is impressively punchy, fat and clear. Both clean and overdrive channels are extraordinarily flexible.

 

Besides two new and one used Gibson L6S I ended up with a few of each of the solidbody electrics worldwide renowned as the inofficial standards. As you may expect, I mean Fender Telecaster, Gibson (and one Epiphone) Les Paul, Fender Stratocaster and Gibson SG. Some are piezo equipped what has become very important for me, some are not. Additionally, I had all of my four Fender Mexico Strats on a budget custom modified, two of them with additional piezos.

 

Finally, I can say that I got well acquainted to all of them meanwhile. For decades I have played a 1978 Gibson SG Standard bought used, a 1985 Weimann Blues Bird and a 1986 Ibanez RG 430. Perhaps due to the differences between them three I was able to adapt my playing to my newer guitars relatively easy. Additionally, I adjust truss rod, intonation, and string action myself - especially the latter takes some time especially on Floyd Rose equipped guitars since one has to tune down all strings completely and to remove the vibrato springs for each try. I also play only roundwound strings of the same make very familiar to me and of only two different gauges, .010" to .046" on vibrato-equipped guitars and .011" to .050" on hardtail instruments. On my basses, however, some are strung roundwound and others flatwound to meet the requirements of the songs we play in the cover band I play bass.

 

When I pack eight to twelve guitars or three to six basses into my car, this is just for fulfilling my personal likes and musical ambitions. And I am a 1959er, too...

 

Sincerely,

capmaster

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Yes to all the wise and worthy suggestions so far... [biggrin]

 

The SG is a truly great and versatile guitar...

 

One approach to add to the collection would be to seek a complementary instrument...ie something different offering alternative tones/handling..

 

Which IMX would point one towards single coil pickups and hollow or semi hollow bodies...

 

The ES 330/Epi Casino are front contenders with Beatles, Stones et al provenance

 

As are various Rickenbackers(325,330) and Gretsch's(Duo Jet,Country Gent,Tennessean)

 

Or forget the hollow option and tap into the world of Fender(predominantly single coil)...Tele,Strat,Mustang,Jazzmaster etc...

 

V

 

:-({|=

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Thanks for taking the time to write and generously providing your insight. It was very interesting to read.

 

I can tell you that I am having a great time with this and that I will take the time it takes to find the right one...

 

Take care!

 

D.

 

 

 

Dear Dan1959,

 

you might have seen some musicians playing countless different guitars in different songs. You only need to think of Billy Gibbons or Joe Bonamassa. Although I am very far from being as talented or famous, I think I know why they are doing so, and experienced it for myself, too: It is just for the songs and the music.

 

Therefore in my humble opinion your question perhaps might be what else guitar complements your personal needs of taste and expression with another sound and/or feel you are missing up to now to fulfill your desire. I think it is more about your likes and ambitions than about what a guitar can do to another one in a stand, case or on the shelf. So it could be that you should make your decision apart from the SG you already own and play, although it probably may act as a benchmark for e. g. convenient playability. I think that other musicians and other amateurs like me can tell you how they would decide or had decided for themselves to give you helpful ideas, but in the end you will have to decide for yourself as you supposed implicitely from the start.

 

When I made decisions to buy several guitars in the past fifteen months, I always had in mind what their use would be for me as songwriter, vocalist and guitar player. I visited several dealers for about 25 to 30 times and checked out circa 150 to 200 instruments. I was just playing parts of my own songs and songs by my bandmates and listened what certain guitars would give back to me when playing. I paid attention to how easy it came to me to find frets blindly, and how different striking and muting techniques apply and translate to the guitar's design.

 

By the way, I think that except those made in the 1970s with the neck set deeper into the body, SGs are the guitars which are hardest to fret, and Stratocasters are the hardest to play with respect to string attack. The best playable guitars for both hands in my opinion are the Les Paul in standard and Axcess shaping as well, and the Fender Telecaster. I can't decide between them, and I even can't when comparing the Axcess shaping to the Telecaster's bolt-on neck joint. For musical reasons, however, I play more often Strats than Teles, and I play my SG Supra excessively for its fantastic piezo sound. I don't miss an acoustic guitar in any way.

 

Strange how things went in the two following respects: I love the fat '50s neck, but besides many '60s Slim Taper neck equipped Gibsons I do own only one LP with a '50s neck and one Axcess which means a fatter neck at the lower frets. My Fenders do have relatively chunky necks, especially the American Deluxe Telecaster Ash. Moreover, my favourite fretboard material is ebony, and I own not a single guitar or bass with! The fantastic, synthetic Richlite fretboard of my SG Supra feels much like ebony, and this is a certain solace for that I hardly find frets blindly on SGs except my 1978 Standard. On both my Frank Zappa "Roxy" SGs it's the sounds that indeed one can't find on any other guitar.

 

Of course, I thoroughly select the amps I use for checking out guitars. In any case a true HiFi amp for acoustic guitar amplification as made by Schertler with all EQs flat is sufficient for me to evaluate both magnetic and piezo pickups for sound. I can imagine what it will sound like when blown through dozens of different amps without testing for that (OK, I am experienced in studio recording and mixing as artist, engineer, or even both at the same time). When it comes to buying, I check for microphonic pickups with an electric guitar amp set to extremely high gain and high volume, preferably an Orange Rockerverb. I don't own one up to now. Orange Amps and cabinets are very fine but extremely heavy. However, the sheer mass seems to do a lot to their sound which is impressively punchy, fat and clear. Both clean and overdrive channels are extraordinarily flexible.

 

Besides two new and one used Gibson L6S I ended up with a few of each of the solidbody electrics worldwide renowned as the inofficial standards. As you may expect, I mean Fender Telecaster, Gibson (and one Epiphone) Les Paul, Fender Stratocaster and Gibson SG. Some are piezo equipped what has become very important for me, some are not. Additionally, I had all of my four Fender Mexico Strats on a budget custom modified, two of them with additional piezos.

 

Finally, I can say that I got well acquainted to all of them meanwhile. For decades I have played a 1978 Gibson SG Standard bought used, a 1985 Weimann Blues Bird and a 1986 Ibanez RG 430. Perhaps due to the differences between them three I was able to adapt my playing to my newer guitars relatively easy. Additionally, I adjust truss rod, intonation, and string action myself - especially the latter takes some time especially on Floyd Rose equipped guitars since one has to tune down all strings completely and to remove the vibrato springs for each try. I also play only roundwound strings of the same make very familiar to me and of only two different gauges, .010" to .046" on vibrato-equipped guitars and .011" to .050" on hardtail instruments. On my basses, however, some are strung roundwound and others flatwound to meet the requirements of the songs we play in the cover band I play bass.

 

When I pack eight to twelve guitars or three to six basses into my car, this is just for fulfilling my personal likes and musical ambitions. And I am a 1959er, too...

 

Sincerely,

capmaster

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LOL!!! I saw a few come and go too before I finally settled down.

 

 

My main guitar is a SG special with burst bucker one and three and split coil. I just ordered a graph tech nut and roller bridge for it. .I have real feelings toward my SG. lol We have seen several women come and go.

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Sounds to me like you have a lot of the rock and blues sounds down with your SG. You might look into a Stratocaster or telecaster to capture some of the earlier Motown type sounds that you're looking for. Also, you can't beat Fender guitars for chimey and sweet sounds.

 

+1

 

Maybe he could also consider a superstrat with a HSS or HSH pickup arrangement to get those strat quacky tones but also cover all the humbucker bases. A locking trem gives that tuning stability if you get in to a bit of whammy bar stuff too. They're not just the preserve of hair metal. I'm sure a lot of the soul and disco musicians were using superstrats in the '80s- they were very much in fashion at the time and looked very cool on stage, matching very well with a snazzy suit as much as they did with spandex.

 

To me, though, the obvious guitar to get after an SG is a Les Paul, especially if you like how Gibsons play and the tone a Gibson solid body gives you. Also, for on off field suggestion, what about a flying V?

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Dan, go to the music stores in your area and play as many guitars as you can and wait for the one that calls out to you. There will be one...

 

OK, here's a more specific, useful suggestion...try some guitars with coil tap/splits (unless you already have that in your SG). I've got a Dean Evo Special Select with Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates, and splitting the coils and using the middle pickup position gives me a very strat-like sound. I also have a Schecter with a single coil and a humbucker with coil split/tap and a Wilkinson tremolo. Neither one of these guitars is a 'common' axe like a LP, Tele or Strat, but that's something I find appealing about them. They're good quality instruments, play easy and have a big variety of sounds.

 

However...I must admit the last several gigs I played my '61 RI SG almost exclusively, I really like those pickups....

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Hi,

 

Not sure about a flying V, though my son really likes it...

 

That said, the Firebird would be an attractive place to explore.

 

Cheers!

 

D.

 

 

+1

 

Maybe he could also consider a superstrat with a HSS or HSH pickup arrangement to get those strat quacky tones but also cover all the humbucker bases. A locking trem gives that tuning stability if you get in to a bit of whammy bar stuff too. They're not just the preserve of hair metal. I'm sure a lot of the soul and disco musicians were using superstrats in the '80s- they were very much in fashion at the time and looked very cool on stage, matching very well with a snazzy suit as much as they did with spandex.

 

To me, though, the obvious guitar to get after an SG is a Les Paul, especially if you like how Gibsons play and the tone a Gibson solid body gives you. Also, for on off field suggestion, what about a flying V?

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Hi,

 

Not sure about a flying V, though my son really likes it...

 

That said, the Firebird would be an attractive place to explore.

 

Cheers!

 

D.

 

I have quite a collection of guitars.... if you like the Gibson necks and scale.... and want a different sound, find something with P90's in it.... it will keep a familiar feel and give a different sound.

 

I really like guitars where the strings are higher off the body, so thus LP, SG, Ric, and Gretsch work for me........ Leo's guitars don't work for me at all.

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As an SG player from WAY back congratulations. The SG really is an impressive instrument to play, its no wonder so many greats have played them. It plays second fiddle to the LesPauls but its a MUCH better player. IMHO.

 

I think you need to expand your horizons a little bit. There is something to be said for the Gibson vs Fender debate. I have both an SG and a strat knock-off. I like them both & find they complement each other well. I think the strat is a more blues oriented guitar. It just seems to work better for me in that genre. Your mileage may vary.

 

Anyway, don't discount the PRS instruments - they are exceptional to play. Try one, it can't hurt. I highly recommend the new PRS Studio - I'll be shopping used ones in the near future in hopes of finding an affordable one. The Rickenbackers & the Gretch jazz guitars also have a great sound, but it's quite different than what you're used to. Give them a try, they are impressive guitars and may REALLY surprise you.

 

You can also consider a P90 equipped SG. A little different sound but same playability. You might even consider modifying your existing SG with split coil HBs to get both SC and HB tones. The P-Rails should make a solid choice for such a mod. More rock & blues tones all in the same guitar. What could be better?

 

Good Luck

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I certainly will not. Actually, I have to confess that I also own a PRS SE Santana (that's our secret OK? LOL . Its a great guitar! I omitted to mention this in my original posting because I'm looking to complement my SG.

 

I have an attraction to the Custom 24 and to the Studio. The price is quite high but perhaps a a Custom 24 along the SE line will work. PRS guitars are works of art as well...

 

All of that said i've received some sound advice and interesting advice. I am keeping my mind open and I'll see where this all takes me.

 

I have no time frame but I'm having loads of fun trying all kinds of different things.

 

Cheers!

 

D.

 

 

As an SG player from WAY back congratulations. The SG really is an impressive instrument to play, its no wonder so many greats have played them. It plays second fiddle to the LesPauls but its a MUCH better player. IMHO.

 

I think you need to expand your horizons a little bit. There is something to be said for the Gibson vs Fender debate. I have both an SG and a strat knock-off. I like them both & find they complement each other well. I think the strat is a more blues oriented guitar. It just seems to work better for me in that genre. Your mileage may vary.

 

Anyway, don't discount the PRS instruments - they are exceptional to play. Try one, it can't hurt. I highly recommend the new PRS Studio - I'll be shopping used ones in the near future in hopes of finding an affordable one. The Rickenbackers & the Gretch jazz guitars also have a great sound, but it's quite different than what you're used to. Give them a try, they are impressive guitars and may REALLY surprise you.

 

You can also consider a P90 equipped SG. A little different sound but same playability. You might even consider modifying your existing SG with split coil HBs to get both SC and HB tones. The P-Rails should make a solid choice for such a mod. More rock & blues tones all in the same guitar. What could be better?

 

Good Luck

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I love my SG Stnd...and my LP Traditional. Someone suggested a P90. I also love my LP Studio 60'sTrib with noiseless P90's. With the right amp setting it too will growl! In fact, my son's a tone snob and a working guitarist...and he says my Tribute is the best sounding of the three Gibsons I own.

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