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MikeL

Where is the Flying V?

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Hi guys, I'm just curious as to what happened to the basic Flying V electric guitar. I've been on Guitar Center.com, Sweetwater.com, musiciansfriend.com, and American Musical Supply and all I can find are two signature models. Gibson doesn't even have it on their website. I'm not looking to buy because I already own one, I was just trying to look up the specs for it. Does anyone know what happened to this guitar and why it can't be found anywhere?

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Thanks for the info. That's kind of sad though, do you know why it's been stopped? Is it coming back at some point?

Gibson is just creating demand. They also stopped production on VOS Juniors as they flooded the market with them.

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I owned a Korina V a number of years back. I missed it after selling it, and was going to seek out another when I came across the Rudolf Schenker Flying V, and I like it even better! Try one out if you can, it's an amazingly great guitar.

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I for one am glad the V has been pulled (and I LOVE Vs)

 

Many take the V's recent history for granted, but it has historically been a limited guitar.

 

 

From 1958 to late 1966 there were only 98 in existence

 

In late '66, there were only 175 "reissues" made for the next 4 years, making 273 Vs in existence through 1970... that's all!

 

The first "successful run" of Vs was the '71 Medallion, which added 350 Vs into the world for a total of 523 up until late '74

 

Second Reissues came out late '74-'75 and ended in '82, but from '58-'79 only 4,019 Vs existed in the universe.

 

 

The 80s brought in the oddballs (from "meh" to "wonderful") but the '67 Reissue released in '89 was the game changer. Despite the '67 aesthetic, it had a modern build that resembled nothing in the 60s and 70s, and for all the reasons why it was great, it is also the model that utterly devalued the latter day flying Vs. Between the overpopulation of Vs from the late 80s forward to Gibson discontinuing ebony boards on its alpine white Vs, and it simply makes sense to give the guitar a rest while demand catches up with all the other ones floating around right now.

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That's very interesting, I knew the V was old, but I had no idea that it was such a specialty guitar. Knowing that now I'm very happy that I was able to get one (back in 2010): by far my favorite guitar.

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V-man, it's guys like yourself that make these forums. The knowledge and history of guitars that guys like you share is cool. Makes for interesting reads. My only V is a 2003 faded with crescent moon inlay. Just a couple days ago I put the original pick guard back on it (didn't much care for the gold mirror pick guard). Guess I'm a little old school!! Thanks for the history lesson!! Cheers!!

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